An update of the classic Shakespeare story, director Kenneth Branagh shot the film like a classic 1930s musical. It tells the story of four best friends who swear off love.

Director:

Kenneth Branagh

Writers:

William Shakespeare (play), Kenneth Branagh (screenplay)
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alessandro Nivola ... The King
Alicia Silverstone ... The Princess
Natascha McElhone ... Rosaline
Kenneth Branagh ... Berowne
Carmen Ejogo ... Maria
Matthew Lillard ... Longaville
Adrian Lester ... Dumaine
Emily Mortimer ... Katherine
Richard Briers ... Sir Nathaniel
Geraldine McEwan ... Holofernia
Stefania Rocca ... Jacquanetta
Jimmy Yuill ... Constable Dull
Nathan Lane ... Costard
Timothy Spall ... Armado
Anthony O'Donnell ... Moth
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Storyline

The King of Navarre and his three companions swear a very public oath to study together and to renounce women for three years. Their honor is immediately put to the test by the arrival of the Princess of France and her three lovely companions. It's love at first sight for all concerned followed by the men's highly entertaining, but hopeless efforts to disguise their feelings. Written by Tender Branson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A New Spin on the Old Song and Dance See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for sensuality and a brief drug reference | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the only William Shakespeare film directed by Kenneth Branagh in which Brian Blessed does not appear. See more »

Goofs

During the tearing of the contract, Berowne mouths Longaville's lines along with him. See more »

Quotes

King Ferdinand of Navarre, The: Navarre shall be the wonder of the world; our court shall be a little Academe, still and contemplative in living art.
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Alternate Versions

The UK Region 2 DVD contains 5 deleted scenes:
  • The boys are arguing about the girls and about breaking the vows the made.
  • Moth, Constable Dull, Holofernia, Sir Nathaniel and Costard and discussing what to perform for the king, the princess and their company. They descide upon performing ^Óthe 9 worthies^Ô. Parts of this scene can be seen in the news reels.
  • The third extra scene is an extended version of the scene were the girls are discussing and mocking the gifts they received from the men. The extra parts are extra dialogue for Katherine and Rosaline. Katherine tells the story of a girl who died from melancholly. Rosaline has an extended part of dialogue in which she mocks the men and Berowne specifically.
  • There is a alternative scene for the masked dance scene more true to the story of Shakespeare. The boys dress up as Russians who specially came to visit the girls.
  • The fifth scene is the performance of 'the 9 worthies' by the supporting characters.
  • The UK Region 2 DVD does also contain various outtakes. Some of these were cut (ca. 4 seconds) to maintain the "U" rating.
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Connections

Referenced in At the Movies: Episode #10.21 (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

They Can't Take That Away From Me
Music by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin
Performed by Kenneth Branagh, Alessandro Nivola, Matthew Lillard, Adrian Lester, Carmen Ejogo, Alicia Silverstone, Emily Mortimer and Natascha McElhone
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User Reviews

 
Triple dedication besides Shakespeare: it also celebrates romantic musicals, lavish revues, and Movietone newsreels
10 July 2000 | by ruby_fffSee all my reviews

So it is, right at the first frame next to the title, "a romantic musical comedy" is the tagline -- up front with no misconception whatsoever for everyone to see. The entrance is grand in Patrick Doyle's scoring style, along with the credit treatment on red satin and all. What an invitation! 'Like it already. Shakespeare would approve and applaud.

It's truly "there's no business like show business like no business I know." Here Shakespeare and his comedy of errors, a-mixing and a-matching love signals at play again. This common "love bug" (literally so) theme is ever present: in "A Midsummer Night's Dream", in "Much Ado About Nothing", it's all love wires a-blindly and mistaken assumptions a-crisscrossing. 'Tis all seeds of "Love's Labour's Lost."

The outstanding ensemble cast, the charming pairings of the lovers, the song and dance numbers (including a sizzling "Let's face the music and dance"), the costumes and sets, Branagh's script and the "Cinetone News" segments, his impeccable direction, and Patrick Doyle, a vital collaborator who provided the attractive score -- collectively made this romantic musical comedy most entertaining.

Branagh's passion in showing off Shakespeare in film media for all to enjoy is beyond evident. It all seem so facile, yet obviously there's plenty of love in nourishing this dream, lots of labour unrelenting from all involved in this production, and the lost would be Branagh's total steadfast lost in realizing this project -- love, labour, 'lost' shiningly shows. He's out done himself!

If you like musicals, romantic comedies, light-hearted Shakespeare -- go for it. The only special effect here is Branagh's magic.


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Details

Country:

UK | France | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

31 March 2000 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Love's Labour's Lost See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$13,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$24,496, 11 June 2000

Gross USA:

$299,792

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$299,792
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Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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