In a future where a special police unit is able to arrest murderers before they commit their crimes, an officer from that unit is himself accused of a future murder.

Director:

Steven Spielberg

Writers:

Philip K. Dick (short story), Scott Frank (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Popularity
546 ( 240)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 20 wins & 90 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tom Cruise ... Chief John Anderton
Max von Sydow ... Director Lamar Burgess
Steve Harris ... Jad
Neal McDonough ... Fletcher
Patrick Kilpatrick ... Knott
Jessica Capshaw ... Evanna
Richard Coca ... Pre-Crime Cop
Keith Campbell ... Pre-Crime Cop
Kirk B.R. Woller ... Pre-Crime Cop
Klea Scott ... Pre-Crime Cop
Frank Grillo ... Pre-Crime Cop
Anna Maria Horsford ... Casey
Sarah Simmons Sarah Simmons ... Lamar Burgess' Secretary
Eugene Osment ... Jad's Technician
James Henderson ... Office Worker
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Storyline

In the year 2054 A.D. crime is virtually eliminated from Washington D.C. thanks to an elite law enforcing squad "Precrime". They use three gifted humans (called "Pre-Cogs") with special powers to see into the future and predict crimes beforehand. John Anderton heads Precrime and believes the system's flawlessness steadfastly. However one day the Pre-Cogs predict that Anderton will commit a murder himself in the next 36 hours. Worse, Anderton doesn't even know the victim. He decides to get to the mystery's core by finding out the 'minority report' which means the prediction of the female Pre-Cog Agatha that "might" tell a different story and prove Anderton innocent. Written by Soumitra

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violence, brief language, some sexuality and drug content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Cate Blanchett was offered the role of Agatha. See more »

Goofs

In the alley where the police are attempting to subdue Anderton, he takes a sick stick and pokes one of the policemen who vomits immediately, but the vomit is coming from "below" his mouth - the "vomit tube" is mis-positioned on the left side of the actor's face. See more »

Quotes

John Anderton: [as he was about to murder Crow just as the Pre-Cogs have seen, he holds Crow at gunpoint] You have the right to remain slient. Anything you do and say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have a right to an attorney. If you can't afford an attorney, we will appoint one. Do you understand these rights?
Leo Crow: You're not gonna kill me?
John Anderton: Do you understand these... rights?
Leo Crow: Listen, if you don't go through with this my family gets nothing, okay? You're supposed to kill me. Just like he said ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The distributor and production company credits look like they are underwater, which ties into the opening shot of Agatha in the tank. See more »

Alternate Versions

Spencer Treat Clark was credited as "Sean at Nine" in release prints of the film, because he appeared in a scene that was deleted so close to the film's release that the credits had already been finalized and couldn't be changed. Clark played a grown-up version of Anderton's young son Sean, in a fantasy dream scene that took place after Anderton has been put in containment toward the end of the film. The entire scene was removed from the film just before release. See more »

Connections

Featured in Deconstructing Precrime and Precogs (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Moon River
Written by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer
Performed by Henry Mancini & His Orchestra
Courtesy of The RCA Records Label, a unit of BMG Music
Under license from BMG Special Products
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User Reviews

What must film makers do? This was GOOD - believe nothing else.
17 July 2002 | by DGoodgerSee all my reviews

I think some people just write reviews for sites like this because they like to complain. I actually find myself wondering if all the gripers here have actually seen Minority Report, as I just have, because I have to say that is one of the most gripping and involving movies I have seen in quite a while.

The content is amazing - all the little details that put the audience firmly in the middle of the 21st century. Personally I can absolutely believe that technology will have advanced in the kind of ways portrayed in the film within 50 years. Just look back 50 years into the past and you should be able to see why. The lives of everyday people in the film, where they are scanned and advertised 'at' all day every day, apart from an excuse for product placement (and why not?), certainly make you think about a world where 'they' know your every move (a future towards which we are already hurtling with some speed).

The style is amazing - why the wooden balls? Because they're cool is why. I like to think that as we progress as a civilization we will keep a few such elegant idiosyncrasies knocking around. The plastic, chrome and glass sets, objects and architecture all looked clean and functional and the way that they suck the color out of a scene worked well and gave the film a distinctive palette. The cars are the best looking vehicles I have ever seen in a film. I have only one criticism here - why do all the computer displays look like Macs? Surely a touch unrealistic ;)

The story is amazing - complicated, yes, but also engrossing, exciting and scary. There are elements here that are only hinted at, but which give the plot a depth increasingly lacking in modern action flicks. And it asks the kind of questions about morality, justice, exploitation and society that'll keep you thinking for much longer that the film's two and some hours.

The direction and performances are amazing - the pre-visualization on this movie must have been a nightmare and yet all the incredible special effects blend perfectly into a visual style that is completely natural and assured, as might be expected from Spielberg and Michael Kahn. There are, of course, numerous references and homages to the work of Stanley Kubrick, which have given a hint of the edge and flair of 'Clockwork Orange' or '2001'. I hope it will continue to be a big influence on Spielberg.

Cruise delivers a first class performance as usual, but the discovery of this film is Samantha Morton as Agatha. Who saw the film and didn't share her terror and vulnerability? Little touches such as the way she clings to Cruise, almost like a baby's reflex, make her a character you immediately care about, innocent and tragic.

Anyway, if that's not enough to recommend the film, then you'll probably never find another one you like again. But if you need another reason, go to see it just for another fantastic soundtrack from the master, John Williams.

Full marks, five stars, a must see several times and buy the DVD movie.


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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

USA

Language:

English | Swedish

Release Date:

21 June 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Total Recall 2 See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$102,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$35,677,125, 23 June 2002

Gross USA:

$132,072,926

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$358,372,926
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Dolby | DTS | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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