Histoire(s) du cinéma (1989–1999)
7.4/10
684
3 user 9 critic

Fatale beauté 

An 8-part documentary chronically the history of cinema: "All the Histories", "A Single History", "Only Cinema", "Deadly "Beauty", "The Coin of the Absolute", "A New Wave", "The Control of the Universe", and "The Signs Among Us".

Director:

Jean-Luc Godard (uncredited)
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Jean-Luc Godard
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Storyline

An 8-part documentary chronically the history of cinema: "All the Histories", "A Single History", "Only Cinema", "Deadly "Beauty", "The Coin of the Absolute", "A New Wave", "The Control of the Universe", and "The Signs Among Us".

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Plot Keywords:

experimental film | essay | See All (2) »

Genres:

Documentary

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Details

Country:

France

Language:

French

Release Date:

29 July 1999 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Historia/e kina: Zabójcze piekno See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Gaumont,Peripheria See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
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User Reviews

 
the best episode thus far
25 July 2018 | by framptonhollisSee all my reviews

As I continue my excursion through Godard's jaw dropping experimental odyssey of a mini series 'Histoire(s) du cinema', I find myself growing more appreciative of how spectacularly unique the portrait Godard is painting here. It is occasionally indulgent and pretentious, but, in the end, it is unlike anything I've ever seen before and has been constantly excited to see what happens next.

So far, this is my favourite episode, and the one I feel the most compelled to re watch. At first, I was less than impressed with this entry, but as I allowed Godard's magic to play out, I found myself moved, amused, and greatly impacted. Godard, at one point, suddenly stops his hijinks to showcase a woman going off on a sort of monologue about beauty and, at first, it felt kind of overlong and silly, but eventually it became one of the most moving moments I've seen appear in the more heavily experimental parts of Godard's filmography. The music, editing, and vibrant visuals have all worked together in each episode so far to create a theatrical, magical, strange, surreal, and challenging experience, and nowhere has it been more directly successful so far than it has been here, in this highly philosophical and occasionally extremely playful installment of what I feel may just be one of Godard's greatest masterpieces.


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