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Galaxy Quest (1999) Poster

(1999)

Trivia

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The scene when Tim Allen is in a men's room overhearing how the cast of Galaxy Quest are nobodies and all the co-stars can't stand him mirrors an actual event in William Shatner's life. He discovered the exact same things about himself when he attended a 1986 convention.
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Director Dean Parisot and star Tim Allen have revealed in interviews that the original tone of the film was much darker, with more scenes of violence. After test screenings, the film was recut to emphasize the comedy and obtain a PG rating.
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Tim Allen admitted that he was quite star-struck when he met Sigourney Weaver, as he's a huge fan of Alien (1979). Allen even got Weaver to sign some of his Alien memorabilia between takes. She ultimately did, writing "Stolen by Tim Allen; Love, Sigourney Weaver", which she said made him very upset.
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This film was one of the earliest to have its own domain name and website, GalaxyQuest.com (now available only via Wayback archive). However, rather than being a polished part of the film's marketing campaign, the site (in keeping with the film's fandom theme) was deliberately designed to look like a fan page, with screen captures and poor HTML coding.
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Gwen DeMarco laments that her TV Guide interview was "six paragraphs of my boobs and how they fit into my suit". This actually happened to Jeri Ryan, who played Seven of Nine on Star Trek: Voyager (1995).
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Sam Rockwell based his portrayal on Bill Paxton's performance in James Cameron's classic Aliens (1986). In particular, his elevated fear of being killed, and his mental collapse upon seeing a motion detector that shows their enemy closing in on them.
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Although Alan Rickman hated sci-fi as a genre, he could not resist taking part in this film as he found the material very funny.
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According to writer David Howard, the continuous melodic yet monotone voice of Thermian commander Mathesar was an original idea that Enrico Colantoni brought to the character. Everyone on the set loved this so much, they keep this in the film.
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Alexander Dane never removes his headpiece throughout the entire film, even when he and Gwen DeMarco are speaking to each other by home phone.
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In the audio commentary for Star Trek (2009), director J.J. Abrams says "By the way, I think we've all gone on record as saying one of our favorite 'Trek' films is 'Galaxy Quest'. And this sequence [where Kirk and Sulu are falling toward Vulcan without a parachute] is clearly an homage to Tony Shalhoub's great save in that film."
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The casting director loved Enrico Colantoni's audition so much, she broke protocol and showed this to other actors to demonstrate how the Thermians should behave.
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On the rock planet, Lt. Laredo chides Dr. Lazarus for holding his tracking device upside down, claiming that he actually thought Dr. Lazarus' character was "smart or something" by the way he was leading the group to find the nearest Beryllium sphere, before realizing he was using the device incorrectly. This is a subtle reference to the first season of Star Trek: The Original Series (1966), where Mr. Spock often held his tricorder back to front, possibly due to Leonard Nimoy being not yet familiar with the prop.
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Just after the crew arrives via the 'pods', the Thermians appear without their appearance generators. When the captain asks "Who wants a tour?", at least Sigourney Weaver did not know that 'Guy' was going to scream in terror as he did. You can see a very real reaction from her at that moment.
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At the beginning of the film, Tommy's line "You are so full of shit, man!" was redubbed to "You are so full of it, man!". When faced with going through "the chompers", Gwen's line "Well, fuck that!" was redubbed to say "Well, screw that!". These edits were to avoid a PG-13 rating. The original lines are still obvious when reading their lips.
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In theaters, the first twenty minutes of the film were presented in the 1.85:1 widescreen image. When Tim Allen first realizes he's on a real spaceship and the vista of Thermia is revealed, the screen image widened to 2.35:1.
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The character Guy Fleegman was an intentional homage to busy Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) actor Guy Vardaman, who not only played several no-name extras in the series, but also served as a stunt/stand-in double for Brent Spiner (Data) and Wil Wheaton (Wesley). His reaction to the homage: "I just about fell out off the chair!" having forgotten being told that the character would appear in a film someday.
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During the fight with the rock monster, Commander Taggart loses his shirt. This is a clear nod to Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) main hero Captain Kirk, who mysteriously lost his shirt in nearly every hand-to-hand fight.
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The N.S.E.A. Protector's serial number is NTE-3120. N.T.E. stands for Not the Enterprise.
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The rock monster is a mock tribute to William Shatner, who desperately wanted to put rock monsters in the climax of Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), but had to cut them out of his script for budgetary reasons. There are a couple of references to Star Trek: The Original Series: Arena (1967), particularly the suggestion to "build some kind of rudimentary weapon" during Jason's encounter with the rock monster.
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Harold Ramis wanted to cast Alec Baldwin in the lead role, which he turned down. Steve Martin and Kevin Kline were considered, though Kline turned it down for family reasons. When Tim Allen was cast, Ramis left the project. After seeing the film, Ramis said he was ultimately impressed with Allen's performance.
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Laliari is the first main role Missi Pyle landed in a feature film. Her role was expanded after the producers noticed Sigourney Weaver was the only female main character.
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The film's script originally contained a mention of Alexander Dane having been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. Alan Rickman asked that this be changed because he believed it was inconsistent with the character, and all mentions of the knighting were removed. However, the character is still listed in the credits as Sir Alexander Dane.
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There were plans to release a sequel, but the sudden death of Alan Rickman on January 14, 2016 brought this to an end.
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Justin Long's cinematic debut.
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The film proved quite popular with Star Trek fans. At the 2013 Star Trek Convention in Las Vegas, it received enough support in a Star Trek Film Ranking, and was included with the twelve Star Trek films that had been released at the time on the voting ballot. The fans at the convention ranked it the seventh best Star Trek film.
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Tim Allen performs several classic James Kirk mannerisms through the course of the film, most notably the classic thinking position while seated in his command chair on the bridge.
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The set of the N.S.E.A. Protector was built on an articulated platform so that it could move a few feet in any direction, for a touch of realism (instead of actors leaning in unison). When it was first used, the set dropped two feet and shifted to the side, causing several cast members to fall out of their chairs and two lights to fall down.
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The promotional campaign for the film included a mockumentary for the E! cable channel about the fictitious Galaxy Quest television series. Most of the cast members appeared as their actor characters from the film. Extras from the film's convention scenes also appeared as fans giving candid interviews. Outtakes and behind-the-scenes footage from the film were used as clips from the television series. The humor even went so far as Sigourney Weaver's character, Gwen DeMarco, claiming that she had turned down "a small part in a Woody Allen movie" to do the Galaxy Quest series, which is a nod to her early gig as an extra in Annie Hall (1977).
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Sigourney Weaver said that whenever she put on the blonde wig to become Gwen DeMarco, "I could feel my I.Q. drop precipitously."
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Alexander Dane (Alan Rickman) accuses Jason Nesmith (Tim Allen) of stealing his best lines and cutting him from entire episodes. This references the alleged diva behavior of William Shatner during the production of Star Trek: The Original Series (1966), as well as the growing dislike that many of his fellow cast members developed towards him. Shatner was said to frequently request additional takes of scenes to extend his own screen time when he felt that other actors became too famous. In many instances, he ordered lines of dialogues to be rewritten for his own character, and he also demanded that the lighting on set should be specifically focused on him.
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Instead of ripping off the standard Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) "Swooosh-thweep" sound for their automatic doors, the N.S.E.A. Protector's automatic doors were given the same "Tweeep-Clunk" sound effect as the doors in the original version of the videogame Doom (1993).
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Director Dean Parisot said that he disliked the studio's decision to dub over Sigourney Weaver's "Fuck that" line with "Screw that", as it got some of the biggest laughs among test audiences. Parisot even admitted that he directed Weaver to give a bad reading of the tamer line so that audiences would notice that the line was dubbed.
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The film was only a modest success at the box-office upon its initial release, which Sigourney Weaver, director Dean Parisot and producer Mark Johnson blamed on poor marketing at the hands of DreamWorks. In particular, Weaver said that the studio needed a family film in the Christmas 1999 slot to go up against Sony's Stuart Little (1999), and proceeded to make edits to Galaxy Quest (1999) in order to make this family-friendly.
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Sam Rockwell almost backed out after winning the lead role in an independent film, but Kevin Spacey convinced him otherwise.
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The evil warlord Sarris was named for film critic Andrew Sarris, who once trashed producer Mark Johnson's The Natural (1984). Sarris' metal eye-patch mimics that worn by General Chang (Christopher Plummer) in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991).
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Rainn Wilson's cinematic debut.
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Screenwriter Robert Gordon got the idea for the "chompers" after seeing the corridor lined with rotating blades in Event Horizon (1997).
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William Shatner has seen this film and apparently enjoyed the film. He has said how jealous he was that this production was allowed to introduce rock monsters ten years after Paramount Studios refused to let him include them in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989) due to budgetary issues. He also jokingly said that he had "no idea who Tim Allen was supposed to be portraying but he did recognize someone playing the Nichelle Nichols character".
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The design of the N.S.E.A. Protector is based on a Star Trek comm-badge.
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Many theaters that showed this film were not told the aspect ratio would widen from 1.85:1 to 2.35:1 after the first reel, as it was assumed that projectionists would by default set their screens to 2.35:1 for an anamorphic print. Nevertheless, many cinemas viewed the first reel and set their masking and curtains to 1.85:1, causing the image to be projected outside the screen once it widened. This happened so many times that a special note had to be sent to projectionists showing the film. Director Dean Parisot later admitted the aspect ratio shift was a "terrible idea".
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When the Thermians state they are part of the Klaatu Nebula, it is homage to the alien Klaatu in The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), one of the all time greats.
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The Thermians use appearance generators to assume human form, while their true form is that of amorphous tentacular entities. This concept was possibly taken from Star Trek: The Original Series: By Any Other Name (1968), where the Kelvans assume human form, but their true form (which is never shown, but described by Spock to Captain Kirk) is that of "massive creatures with hundreds of tentacles".
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When the crew meet the Thermians for the first time, one of the tentacled creatures is holding a speculum.
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Alexander Dane's resentment of being typecast following his famous television role reflects on Alan Rickman similarly trying to avoid typecasting as a villain. Both Dane and Rickman also came from Shakespearian acting backgrounds.
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Tony Shalhoub originally auditioned for Guy Fleegman, but Sam Rockwell won the role, and Shalhoub was cast as Fred Kwan instead.
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According to this film, Sam Rockwell's character played an adult on the original series, whereas Daryl Mitchell's character played a child. Daryl Mitchell is actually three years older than Sam Rockwell.
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Director Dean Parisot wanted this film to be like The Wizard of Oz (1939), with Nesmith falling asleep in the limousine and waking up on the spaceship so it could be interpreted as just a dream, but the studio made him add the shot of the limousine being 'beamed up' to simplify the narrative.
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When the crew are eating aboard the ship, they are told that the food has been prepared based on their regional cuisine. Commander Taggart comments that the steak tastes like corn-fed Iowa Beef. This seems like a subtle reference to the fact that Captain James T. Kirk is from Iowa.
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The design for Sarris' flagship is a cross between the designs for the Planet Killer from Star Trek: The Original Series: The Doomsday Machine (1967) (notably the massive, glowing maw in the front of the ship) and a D'deridex-class Romulan warbird from Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) (the open design of the rear nacelles).
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Industrial Light & Magic made two CGI models of the NSEA Protector. One was used for scenes from the original television episodes, and was deliberately designed to look a little dated and low tech. The other model, depicting the real working ship built by the Thermians, had much more detail.
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The filmmakers initially refused to consider Sigourney Weaver for the role of Gwen DeMarco/Tawny Madison, because they didn't want any famous sci-fi actors in the movie.
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When looking for the ship's core and entering the air ducts, Gwen DeMarco says "Ducts? Why is it always ducts?". This is a very possible reference to Sigourney Weaver's involvement in the Alien films where a great deal of the action takes place in ducts.
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For the reptilian warlord, Sarris, the mechanical department used a technology created initially for a Planet of the Apes project in development, which enabled an actor's facial expressions to be translated to an outer makeup appliance--a challenge Stan Winston had been working on, in one way or another, ever since he had built the Wookie heads for The Star Wars Holiday Special twenty years earlier.
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Justin Long said he was nervous auditioning as an unknown actor at the time, competing against Kieran Culkin, Eddie Kaye Thomas and Tom Everett Scott for the role of Brandon Weegar.
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The name Alexander Dane alludes to this character's seriousness as an actor in the legitimate Shakespearean theatre. William Shakespeare's character Hamlet, universally regarded as the most desirable Shakespearean role to play on stage, is sometimes referred to as "the melancholy Dane".
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Reportedly originally developed by Harold Ramis for Disney, but Ramis dropped out before production began.
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Bernie Wrightson created concept artwork for the blue baby/aliens and he kept these little blue creatures true to the script. The script describes them as looking like babies but displaying a mouthful of fearsome shark's teeth when they smile. Based on the concept artwork, Paul Mejias sculpted maquettes that were later scanned to create computer models for the animated characters.
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Sigourney Weaver's character Gwen DeMarco/Tawny Madison is heavily based on Erin Gray's character Colonel Wilma Deering from Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1979). During that series' first season, Gray was often shown in sexy skintight catsuits and had been asked to dye her brunette hair honey blonde.
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The design of the N.S.E.A. Protector is the U.S.S. Enterprise in reverse. Each of the Enterprises have a round command section and long cylindrical engines. The Protector has a long cylindrical command section and round engines.
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In a neat twist of irony, this film would go on to influence the Star Trek (2009) reboot ten years after its release. Producer and director J.J. Abrams is a huge fan of Galaxy Quest (1999) and had the green lighting of Sarris' ship repeated in Nero's ship Narada. He also borrowed the idea of the manner of Sarris' ship's destruction (being charged headlong) for Nero's ship. Also, when Eric Bana was struggling for ideas as to how to play Nero, Abrams showed him a copy of this film and told him he wanted him to portray him in a similar vein to how Robin Sachs plays Sarris.
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Tech Sgt. Chen would seem to satirize the method of casting Europeans as other races (although Tony Shalhoub is Lebanese). The character Fred Kwan (who admits this is not his real name) only ever goes into "Chen mode" (narrowing his eyes as if to imitate an East Asian appearance) occasionally, usually when prompted by someone saying his name or otherwise reminded to be in character.
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The weapons used by Sarris' boarding party are quite similar to those used by Zorg's fighters from the set of The Fifth Element (1997) filmed two years prior. It's not uncommon for some props in all types of films to be sold off and/or rented for other productions.
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A piece of Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) fan-fiction with a similar plot, Jean Lorrah and Willard F. Hunt's "Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited", was originally published in the magazine ''Spockanalia'' in 1967, and was reprinted in the 1970s in "Star Trek: The New Voyages", an anthology of fan-fiction edited by Sondra Marshak, Jacqueline Lichtenberg and Myrna Culbreath. In the story, William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and DeForest Kelley are accidentally beamed to the actual U.S.S. Enterprise in a crisis with the Klingons.
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The robot on stage with Guy Fleegman at the film's beginning is also one used in Toys (1992) with Robin Williams. They are the back-up security system his uncle uses.
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"When we were testing things for Planet of the Apes," Richard Landon recalled, "Stan came up to me one day, and said, 'Figure out a way to make a transfer mechanism, so that an actor's face can actually move a muzzle.' This was another case of Stan saying, 'I don't know how to do this because I'm technically averse' - and then exactly describing the mechanism to me. Just in the way he described its purpose, Stan had described the mechanism itself. It was just a little linkage device that made the makeup move when the actor's face moved. And that's what we used for the muzzle on Sarris."
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The tear-drop-shaped formations in the background when the ship is taking off from a rocky planet are based on Roger Dean's cover for the live album "Yessongs" (1973) by the rock band Yes.
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After the premiere of the movie, E! cable channel produced a mockumentary about it, where the cast were keep in their characters talking about the fictional television series and its impact on society, in addition to show comments of fans and conventions about the series. The mockumentary was finally released in 2019, matching the movie's 20th anniversary, under the title of "Galaxy Quest 20th Anniversary: The Journey Continues".
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During the period of filming, the entire cast of the movie attended a 20th Anniversary screening of Alien (1979). After filming completed, Sigourney Weaver keep the wig she wore for her role as Gwen DeMarco/Tawny Madison.
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The ship's computer voice reports an error as "Memory check-sum invalid". "Check-sum" is an actual method of mathematically validating computer data.
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There is an oft-repeated claim that some Americans in the late 1960s, believing that the sitcom Gilligan's Island (1964) was a true story, attempted to organize a rescue for the castaways. A moment in this film lampoons that story by having the Thermians believe the show was true.
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The control labels on the engine core control panel include "General Purpose Computer", and "MKL" (a real computer acronym for "Math Kernel Library").
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Paul Rudd auditioned for a role, while David Alan Grier was the second choice for Tommy Webber, and Jennifer Coolidge for Laliari.
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Stan Winston's crew built the Thermians--five large, brightly colored, cable-operated silicone puppets--separately molding forty-five tentacles for each one. The puppets were built, and painted. Performance was rehearsed and ready. And with only two weeks remaining before they were to be taken to the set for filming, Stan received a call from Steven Spielberg, saying he was not sure about the Thermian design. Upon review, Spielberg had decided that they were too bizarre, that they should look more humanoid, like the aliens in Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).
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The second feature film from director Dean Parisot, whose first television directing gig was the episode of "Reading Rainbow" in which host LeVar Burton takes the viewers behind the scenes of Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987).
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Commander Peter Quincy Taggart is named for to Peter Quince in William Shakespeare's comedy "A Midsummer Night's Dream".
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When the Thermians run, in their silver suits and moving their arms up and down in front of them, and with stiff legs in an awkward gait, they appear to paying homage to the space aliens from the classic Invaders from Mars (1953).
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The main characters are clearly based on the main cast members of Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) - Jason Nesmith is obviously William Shatner; Gwen DeMarco is Nichelle Nichols; Alexander Dane is Leonard Nimoy with a little Patrick Stewart (the classically trained thespian who resents being best known for a sci-fi role); Fred Kwan is a mixture of James Doohan and Walter Koenig (an actor playing a fake nationality), though his easygoing attitude is from Doohan and DeForest Kelley; and Tommy Webber is a mixture of George Takei and Wil Wheaton, being a young ethnic minority being the helmsman.
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Tim Allen's appearance, especially his haircut and squared off sideburns, was closely modeled on William Shatner's appearance in Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979). Also his character's lack of trust with the digital conveyor's technology is reminiscent of Doctor McCoy's comments on the theory behind transporter technology in the same film.
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Guy Fleegman's character name in the Galaxy Quest television series is Crewman No. 6. When the Thermians transport the actors to their ship, he requests to tag along with the five members of the N.S.E.A. Protector crew, therefore making him the sixth crewman also in reality.
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Stan Winston phoned supervisor Shane Mahan with the news. "I remember Stan saying, 'Are you sitting down?' And then he told me what Steven wanted to do. I couldn't believe it. We had gone to so much trouble for these things. And, at this point, we had only two weeks to come up with something entirely new. So I said to Stan: 'Of course, we will do whatever Steven wants. But these things are done, they're great, and I think we should stick with them.' Stan heard me out, and said, 'Okay, let me call Steven back.' I don't know what Stan said to him, but after they talked, Steven decided that the Thermians were probably all right as they were. The Thermians were shot; and, in my opinion, they were just great."
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Sam Lloyd and Matt Winston, who appear together as Thermian crew members, later appeared on Scrubs (2001), with Lloyd as Ted Buckland and Winston as Dr. Jeffrey Steadman. Winston also appeared, around the same time, on Star Trek: Enterprise (2001) as a recurring character. Sam Lloyd is the nephew of Christopher Lloyd, who played a huge fan of Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) on Taxi (1978), and a Klingon commander in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984).
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The brief scene near the film's ending, where Brandon runs through his house with an armload of fireworks, may be a reference to a similar situation in Flight of the Navigator (1986). There, as in this film, the fireworks are meant to guide an incoming spaceship to a particular landing site.
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Alan Rickman plays Alexander Dane, whose character, Dr. Lazarus, is meant to be an alien. Stan Winston Studio had to create an actual makeup that was meant to represent a piece of iconic, historic TV makeup. To create the iconic headwear, SWS crew first took a head-and-shoulder life-cast from Alan Rickman, then sculpted, molded and fabricated the prosthetics, which were custom painted.
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Two members of the film's cast members have actually played roles in the Star Trek franchise. Heidi Swedberg played a Cardassian dissident on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993) (episode "Profit and Loss"), while Rainn Wilson would later appear in two episodes of the first season of Star Trek: Discovery (2017).
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The scene in which the Protector leaves the spacedock is very reminiscent of a similar scene in Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979). Although with Sulu at the helm, the departure went a great deal smoother.
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In 2006, Paramount Pictures, the owner of the Star Trek franchise from 1967-2005, acquired DreamWorks, which made this film. At the time of this acquisition, Viacom, the parent of Paramount since 1994, had just split into two companies: CBS Corporation, which included Paramount's original television division and the rights to the Star Trek brand, and a new Viacom, which owned Paramount Studios and the Star Trek film rights. In 2019, Viacom and CBS re-merged, forming ViacomCBS, and bringing together the Star Trek films and television series back under one roof, also including Galaxy Quest (1999).
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Sigourney Weaver, Sam Rockwell and Daryl Mitchell recorded an amateur music video for her agent's birthday. The amateur music video is currently featured on the Blu-ray special edition.
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The characters who are actors in the fictitious Galaxy Quest television series are largely based on the actors in the real-life Star Trek franchise. This film contains numerous references to events in the lives of the Star Trek actors.
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In 1999, Tim Allen starred in two films that included a storyline about unfinished television episode plots that had to be completed in real life. Toy Story 2 (1999) with the fictional show "Woody's Roundup" being cancelled without an ending, and Galaxy Quest (1999) with of course been about a fictional show completing the Omega-13 plotline from the show.
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This is one of two 1999 films where Alan Rickman plays a non-human (or at least a human playing a non-human). The other is Dogma (1999) where he plays an angel.
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Gwen DeMarco laments that her TV Guide interview was "six paragraphs of my boobs and how they fit into my suit". Female actors are often asked about how they fit into their super hero costumes like Scarlett Johansson and Anne Hathaway. They have complained in interviews that interviewers focus too much on that.
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Sigourney Weaver, Sam Rockwell and Alan Rickman have all appeared in other films involving space travel. Weaver appeared in Alien (1979), opposite Sir Ian Holm as a robot; Rockwell played Zaphod Bebblebrox, a two-headed alien and outlaw President of the Galaxy in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (2005); and Rickman played a robot in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (2005), opposite Martin Freeman.
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Missi Pyle (Laliari) and Justin Long (Brandon) would later appear on screen together in the film Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story (2004).
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This film, like many others, borrows plot elements from Seven Samurai (1954).
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Although this film is an obvious parody of Star Trek: The Original Series (1966), the timeline of the fictional Galaxy Quest television series, that supposedly ran from 1980-82, is much more representative of the television series Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1979), although there are subtle nods to Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) such as the inclusion of Tommy Webber, a child prodigy based on Wesley Crusher. Also the film's main villain Sarris has a metal studded eye-patch, similar to General Chang, the main villain of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991).
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The natural undisguised appearance of the Thermians is reminiscent of the aliens in the Space: 1999 (1975) two-part episode "The Bringers of Wonder" (1977).
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This is the first time Tim Allen and Sigourney Weaver appear on screen together. They reunited eleven years later in the film Crazy on the Outside (2010).
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Sarris has what looks like insect, spider legs coming out of his head. This is exactly how the head in The Thing (1982) looked when it sprouted off the legs on the head, before the things formed and ran into the base.
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When the crew first arrives on the Protector, they are given a tour. If you listen carefully, you can hear Tech Sergeant Chen (played by Tony Shalhoub) comment on how clean the floors are. This mirrors something the OCD character Shalhoub would play on the television series Monk (2002) might say, three years after this film's release.
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Patrick Breen (Quellek) appears as Auble the Christmas cards guy in the film Christmas with the Kranks (2004) starring Tim Allen.
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Jason Nesmith shares a surname with Michael Nesmith, star of The Monkees (1966). This sitcom was produced contemporaneously with Star Trek: The Original Series (1966), and shared several of its memorable guest stars. Star Trek even capitalized on The Monkees' popularity by introducing actor Walter Koenig (as Pavel Chekov) to the series, on the basis of his resemblance to Monkees star Davy Jones. It is unclear whether Galaxy Quest's use of the name Nesmith is a deliberate in-joke or merely coincidental.
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Sam Rockwell and Justin Long have both starred in films directed by Victor Salva. Rockwell starred in Clownhouse (1989) and Long starred in Jeepers Creepers (2001).
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Despite frequent whining about his character Crewman Number Six being expendable and going to die, Guy Fleegman is the only crew member not to be shot and killed by Sarris during his surprise assault.
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At the film's ending just before the opening credits for the new Galaxy Quest series, the announcer says "Now back after 18 years, the New Adventures of Galaxy Quest". Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) was cancelled in 1969 and Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) premiered in 1987, also 18 years later. The new upcoming series Star Trek: Picard (2020) will continue the adventures of Star Trek: The Next Generation, 18 years after Star Trek: Nemesis (2002) (The final TNG film) premiered in theaters.
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As the Protector departs the spacedock, the structure is shown to have been built into a shard of a once-habitable planet, foreshadowing the later revelation that the Thermians have been nearly exterminated.
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When the captain is fighting the pig lizard and the ship reports they are going to use the digital conveyor to 'beam him up', Captain Taggert says "cut me into cubes and send me up in a million pieces". Dr. McCoy on Star Trek: The Original Series (1966) and the Star Trek (2009) reboot. Karl Urban plays Dr. McCoy and says the same thing DeForest Kelley said that "It's not right to be taken apart and put back together in a million pieces, your parts might be scattered throughout the universe, it's not natural!".
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The scene in which Sarris kills almost everyone on the command deck is very reminiscent of the Kobayashi Maru scene in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), in which most of the command deck personnel are killed. It is later revealed to be a training exercise, and similarly to Galaxy Quest and the activation of the Omega 13, no one is actually harmed.
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When they use the Omega 13 device, almost a minute passes before the activation, so the Omega 13 must go back a full minute, not 13 seconds, as suggested by Brandon Weegar. However, the events during General Sarris' attack are mostly depicted in slow motion, so the total time could be 13 seconds.
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The scene where Sarris kills almost everyone on the command deck is a homage to the final scene in the Blake's 7 (1978) series finale "Blake" where all the main characters are shot in a similar manner.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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