An epic mosaic of interrelated characters in search of love, forgiveness, and meaning in the San Fernando Valley.
Popularity
1,359 ( 120)
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 28 wins & 56 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Pat Healy ... Sir Edmund William Godfrey / Young Pharmacy Kid
Genevieve Zweig Genevieve Zweig ... Mrs. Godfrey
Mark Flanagan Mark Flanagan ... Joseph Green (as Mark Flannagan)
Neil Flynn ... Stanley Berry
Rod McLachlan ... Daniel Hill
Allan Graf ... Firefighter
Patton Oswalt ... Delmer Darion
Raymond 'Big Guy' Gonzales Raymond 'Big Guy' Gonzales ... Reno Security Guard
Brad Hunt ... Craig Hansen
Jim Meskimen ... Forensic Scientist
Chris O'Hara ... Sydney Barringer
Clement Blake ... Arthur Barringer
Frank Elmore Frank Elmore ... 1958 Detective
John Kraft Seitz John Kraft Seitz ... 1958 Policeman
Cory Buck Cory Buck ... Young Boy
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Storyline

24 hours in L.A.; it's raining cats and dogs. Two parallel and intercut stories dramatize men about to die: both are estranged from a grown child, both want to make contact, and neither child wants anything to do with dad. Earl Partridge's son is a charismatic misogynist; Jimmy Gator's daughter is a cokehead and waif. A mild and caring nurse intercedes for Earl, reaching the son; a prayerful and upright beat cop meets the daughter, is attracted to her, and leads her toward a new calm. Meanwhile, guilt consumes Earl's young wife, while two whiz kids, one grown and a loser and the other young and pressured, face their situations. The weather, too, is quirky. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Things fall down. People look up. And when it rains, it pours.

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, drug use, sexuality and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

After the financial and critical success of Boogie Nights (1997), New Line Cinema told Paul Thomas Anderson that they would bankroll whatever he fancied making afterwards. Anderson readily agreed to this as he figured that it was very unlikely that he would ever be in that position again. See more »

Goofs

When Linda Partridge is first placed in the ambulance, the EMT crew is not providing ventilations for her after stating that she has six respirations per minute (norm is 12-20). This would be priority and the crew should have been using an Ambu on scene. Such equipment is not seen until later. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: In the New York Herald, November 26, year 1911, there is an account of the hanging of three men. They died for the murder of Sir Edmund William Godfrey; Husband, Father, Pharmacist and all around gentle-man resident of: Greenberry Hill, London. He was murdered by three vagrants whose motive was simple robbery. They were identified as: Joseph Green, Stanley Berry, and Daniel Hill. Green, Berry, Hill. And I Would Like To Think This was Only A Matter Of Chance. As reported in the Reno...
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Crazy Credits

Underneath the title at the end a line reads "for fa and ea". fa is Fiona Apple (Paul Thomas Anderson's girlfriend) ea is Ernie Anderson (Paul Thomas Anderson's father) See more »

Alternate Versions

The supplemental material disc of the R1 special edition DVD of Magnolia has about 8 minutes of hidden outtake footage. To access it, you need to select the 'Color Bars' option and wait about twenty seconds. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Six Feet Under: The Rainbow of Her Reasons (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

One
Written by Harry Nilsson
Performed by Aimee Mann
Courtesy of Superego Records
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User Reviews

 
A positive, joyful film
29 March 2003 | by joey_zazaSee all my reviews

A rich slice of modern life presented wonderfully by Paul Thomas Anderson. Nine or so "broken" people are followed through the film, each of them at least vaguely interconnected to the others. We are shown where they are currently at in life, and find out what has happened to have brought them there. By the end of the film, they are finally at a point where they can confront what is making them so unhappy and perhaps take control of their lives and look forward to a brighter future (even if their time is limited).

Some people have complained about the ending of the film, perhaps hoping for everything to be neatly tied up, or at least for something less absurd than we get. In my opinion, however, it is perfectly apt for things to end as they do. We dip into these characters' lives in the present, learn about their past, and leave with optimism for their future. I would have found a cinematic "group hug" to be overly sentimental and highly unnecessary. For that alone, the director must be applauded for exercising some restraint. It would have been far too easy to extend the story a bit further and portray the characters as now being "mended", but this is not how real life is and would not have rung true with the film's overall tone of "this is just something that happens".

The sheer ambition of the director is also welcomed. It looks like pre-millennial tension sparked off a mini-renaissance in Hollywood, with this film and others such as "Fight Club" and "American Beauty" harking back to the period in the 70s when there was no distinction between "mainstream" and "arthouse". A-list actors and directors were not afraid to take a few risks and box-office gross was not the only factor used to denote a film's success or failure. It remains to be seen whether the current revival is just a blip. Let's hope not.

As for Mr. Cruise, although this may be his best performance to date, at times he looked a bit out of his depth. At the bedside scene, for example, the clenched fist, intense gaze and facial grimace instantly shattered my suspension of disbelief. This trademark Cruise gesture (as much so as Bruce Willis' smirk) crossed the line between character and actor, turning "Frank TJ Mackey" back into "Tom Cruise - Movie Star". For most of the film his performance was convincing, but when the role required some real emotion or loss of control, his limited acting range was exposed. I don't think he'll ever be able to achieve the credibility he'd like, but a good start would be to take on more such challenging roles, with the proviso that they are not obvious vanity projects or oscar-vehicles.

To sum up, I found this film warm and sincere, not pretentious as some have suggested. As for the frogs? Well, don't strain yourself looking for some deep, hidden metaphor, just take it at face value and enjoy the pure spectacle that you get from the sheer number and size of the frogs. It's a visually stunning sequence, up there with other truly classic moments in cinema.

From reading some of the comments presented here, it seems a shame that many people can't get past the swearing, drugs, running time or "arthouse cinema" tag. To really enjoy this film, you probably need to watch it without any such prejudices, and to leave your cynicism at the door. Don't be afraid of not "getting it", take it as you find it. Just sit back, let it envelop you and you'll be rewarded.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | French

Release Date:

7 January 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mag·no'li·a See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$37,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$193,604, 19 December 1999

Gross USA:

$22,455,976

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$48,451,803
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | SDDS | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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