A nightmare chase through hell in a never-ending, unrequited daisy chain of desire...

Director:

Richard Lowenstein

Writers:

Richard Lowenstein, John Birmingham (adapted from the book by)
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1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Noah Taylor ... Danny
Emily Hamilton ... Sam
Romane Bohringer ... Anya
Sophie Lee Sophie Lee ... Nina
Alex Menglet ... Taylor
Brett Stewart Brett Stewart ... Flip
Damian Walshe-Howling ... Milo
Francis McMahon ... Dirk
Ian Hughes ... Iain the Socialist
Torquil Neilson Torquil Neilson ... Otis
Tim Robertson ... Melbourne Detective 1
Linal Haft ... Brisbane Goon 1
Skye Wansey ... Detective O'Neil
Robert Morgan ... Melbourne Detective 2
Scott Major ... Welfare Officer
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Storyline

A search for love, meaning and bathroom solitude. Danny goes through a series of shared housing experiences in a succession of cities on the east coast of Australia. Together these vignettes form a narrative that is surprisingly reflective. Written by Film Movement

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Some people will do anything to get out of paying the rent

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The opening line of the credits reads 'For Michael 1960 -1997', referring to Michael Hutchence, a close friend of director Lowenstein. See more »

Goofs

In the scene with Dirk and Nina arguing over the pineapple chunks, the label on the can changes from shot to shot, from "pineapple pieces" to "sliced pineapple". Neither can contains "pineapple chunks" as said in the dialogue. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Danny: Flip, turn the fucking TV off! People are trying to sleep.
[Flip does not respond]
Danny: Flip, have some fucking consideration.
[Danny turns the TV off]
Danny: For Christ's sake, Flip... Flipster? Oh, shit. Shit! Fuck!
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Crazy Credits

Apologies to: Jean-Luc Godard, Buster Keaton, Louise Brooks, Anna Karina, Antonin Artand, Robert Bresson, Jean-Pierre Melville, Andrei Tarkovsky, Fedorico Fellini, Emir Kusturica, Wong Kar Wei, Yasujiro Ozu, Jean-Paul Satre, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jean-Pierre Leaud, Alain Delon, Francis Ford Coppola, Elvis Presley & Sandy Harbutt. See more »

Connections

Referenced in All My Friends Are Leaving Brisbane (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Auld Lang Syne
(traditional)
Performed by The Melbourne University Choral Society
Collected by Robert Burns (as Robbie Burns)
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User Reviews

Felafel rolls up housesharing
17 March 2002 | by Philby-3See all my reviews

Putting John Burningham's best-selling but episodic reminiscences of house-sharing into a watchable feature film was quite a challenge, but a veteran house-sharer, Richard Lowenstein (`Dogs in Space'), succeeds here by having several of the more interesting and bizarre characters follow the narrator (Noah Taylor) from city to city. The felafel, in fact, a throwaway line in the book, is given centre stage, and the result is a well-focused tale of the horrors of house-sharing – it's the `Secret Life of Us' meets `Romper Stomper'.

Noah Taylor is one of those actors who cannot fail if given a goofy role, and here he is perfect as Danny, the aspiring writer roughing it with a collection of druggies, minor criminals, aspiring sorceresses and actors, while trying to evade his creditors and write a prize-winning story for `Penthouse'. Allegedly irresistible to women, he fails badly with his female housemates. As one of them says, incredulously: `Have an affair with you? I'm not a masochist!'

Romane Bohringer gives another strong performance as Anya, a sort of social bomb-thrower with a taste for Druid ritual, who puts any place she joins into an uproar in no time. Then there is Taylor the mad drunk (Alex Menglet), Flip the junkie (a touching performance from Brett Stewart), Nina the terminally vain soap actor (Sophie Lee hopefully not as herself) Iain the doctrinaire socialist (Ian Hughes in Melbourne of course) and Dirk the emerging homosexual (Francis McMahon), amongst others. Some of the landlord's agents do not lack colour either eg Linal Haft's rent collector as gangster in Brisbane.

All these characters are somehow accommodated in the story, though an early peak (the great bikie party in the Brisbane house) is followed by rather a flat period in Melbourne. Once the circus reaches Sydney, however, things pick up again – perhaps it's the more effervescent air.

The tropical squalor of the first house, a battered `Queenslander,' reminded me a little of `Praise', a vastly different film in tone, but Danny is not necessarily one of life's defeated, though it seems like that sometimes. This movie has a decidedly upbeat tone; the last place might have been pretty rugged, bet there's always the hope of something more salubrious, or at least of more congenial flatmates. No doubt admirers of the book will take offence at what has been left out, but Lowenstein should be given credit for giving it a cinematic context.


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Details

Country:

Australia | Italy

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 August 2001 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

E morì con un felafel in mano See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

AUD3,900,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$307,159
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color
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