Mickey and the Beanstalk (1947) - News Poster

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Disney Classics Hercules, Tarzan, More Come to Blu-ray

  • Cinelinx
Walt Disney Home Entertainment has been dropping catalog titles on Blu-ray for a while now. Once every few months we’ll get a higher end title like The Little Mermaid or the upcoming Sleeping Beauty that gets their own time in the limelight. In between those, they’ve been delivering smaller films and collections in groups of four or five at a time. This time around they’ve mixed it up a little by giving us two newer top-shelf releases with three timeless tales.

Hercules Special Edition brings the story of the Greek hero to Blu-ray for the first time. The Academy Award-nominated movie is filled with great songs and plenty of laughs thanks to Danny DeVito and company. Bonus material includes “From Zero to Hero” Sing-Along, “No Importa La Distancia” Music Video with Ricky Martin, and “The Making of Hercules” featurette.

Edgar Rice Burroughs’ swinging ape man comes to
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Disney Classics Getting Blu-Ray Release August 12th – Tarzan, Hercules, And More

A slew of classic Disney movies are hitting for the first time on Blu-Ray, including one double-pack release, and you’re going to want to make sure to pick these up. You haven’t paid attention to some of these titles for a while, and it’s about time you got the chance to catch them on Blu-Ray. The best part is that there’s a great mix of releases hitting. Bedknobs and Broomsticks is all but lost in the cultural consciousness, and it deserves a return. The Academy Award-winning movie from the year I was born is filled with a lot of fun and adventure, and like most Disney films, holds up well for a whole new generation.

The rest of the group covers a great spectrum, including two animated “big” titles, and a 10th Anniversary release. There’s a lot to expose your family to here, so check out all the info below,
See full article at AreYouScreening »

10 Terrifying Disney Animated Moments

Disney was built on their animated cartoons and films. They've entertained audiences for years, and have inspired us and sparked our imaginations. Like many of you, I've enjoyed watching these movies and shows since I was a little kid, but holy crap! There are some extremely dark and terrifying moments that could really screw a kid up! Disney did some jacked up stuff. I've come up with a list of ten scenes from these kids movies that are the things of nightmares. I should let you know that I wanted to keep this list strictly Disney, so I did not include any Pixar films. I also didn't include such traumatic scenes such as Bambi's mom and Simba's dad dying. Look over the list and let us know of any other scenes that Disney screwed you up with.

Dumbo - Drunken Pink Elephants

As a kid I had no idea what was going on here!
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Disney 53, Week 10: Melody Time

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more re-editions than a Spielberg movie, and that’s saying something. This week it’s Melody Time.

Directed by Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske, Clyde Geronimi and Wilfred Jackson

1948/ 75 Minutes

Aaand we’re back to the grab bag again. This was the last “package film” Disney made – cheap and cheerful shorts made up of whatever scraps were left in the barrel. Disney made no restrictions on their artists, and it shows.

Synopsis: After a schmaltzy title song and cards introducing the players, an animated paintbrush “paints” a quite disturbing pair of lips, before painting the rest of the host,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Film Face-off at Movies.com: ‘Jack the Giant Slayer’ vs. ‘Mickey and the Beanstalk’

I write an article at movies.com called Film Face-off, where I take two things, and they battle it out. The things could be actors, movies, characters, just about anything. Here is the first one. Give it some love, comments, tweets, Facebook affection.

Jack the Giant Slayer vs Mickey and the Beanstalk

Jack the Giant Slayer is an old tale with a new twist. Aren’t they all? Since Jack (Nicholas Hoult) isn’t the first to fight a giant, we thought it would be best to give him the versus treatment with the most famous Jack of all: Mickey. Mickey Mouse (voiced by Walt Disney) first climbed up a beanstalk in a segment in the 1947 film Fun and Fancy Free, and then in 1963 it officially became Mickey and the Beanstalk, narrated by the famous Ludwig Von Drake. It’s Jack vs. Mickey, it’s Mickey vs. Jack, in the
See full article at Scorecard Review »

Film Face-off: 'Jack the Giant Slayer' vs. 'Mickey and the Beanstalk'

Jack the Giant Slayer is an old tale with a new twist. Aren't they all? Since Jack (Nicholas Hoult) isn't the first to fight a giant, we thought it would be best to give him the versus treatment with the most famous Jack of all: Mickey. Mickey Mouse (voiced by Walt Disney) first climbed up a beanstalk in a segment in the 1947 film Fun and Fancy Free, and then in 1963 it officially became Mickey and the Beanstalk, narrated by the famous Ludwig Von Drake. It's Jack vs. Mickey, it's Mickey vs. Jack, in the very first versus of epic proportions. You know, because we're dealing with giants.   Hardship Jack Mickey Jack's mom died when he was little, his dad dies while he's still a teenager, and his uncle is...

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See full article at Movies.com »

Disney 53, Week 9: Fun and Fancy Free

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more re-editions than a Spielberg movie, and that’s saying something.

This week it’s Fun And Fancy Free

Directed by Jack Kinney, Bill Roberts, Hamilton Luske and William Morgan.

1947/ 73 Minutes

After the grab-bag nature of Make Mine Music, Fun And Fancy Free feels a much tighter return to form for the Disney studios. Both shorts, Bongo and Mickey and the Beanstalk were started on almost a decade earlier.

Bongo, based on a short story by Sinclair Lewis of Cosmopolitan magazine in 1930, was originally suggested to be a prequel to Dumbo, setting it in the same circus and
See full article at The Hollywood News »

'Once Upon a Time': Jorge Garcia's 'murderous' giant is likely to return

Jorge Garcia's first appearance on "Once Upon a Time" as the Giant of "Jack and the Beanstalk" fame probably won't be his last.

"I got word last week that they're looking to bring me back in about a month," Garcia tells Zap2it. "So it looks like there will be at least another one."

In Sunday's episode (Nov. 4), Emma (Jennifer Morrison) and Capt. Hook (Colin O'Donoghue) climb the beanstalk in search of a magical compass that may help get Emma back to Storybrooke. The Giant, as you might expect, is less than happy to have visitors -- ABC even describes the character as "murderous." Playing mean was something Garcia, best known as super-nice guy Hurley on "Lost," has been itching to do.

Pics: 'Once Upon a Time' Season 2

"It was a joy," he says. "It was exactly the kind of stuff I was looking forward to getting to do
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Disney's 50 Finest: In Order of Awesome

Just days before the release of "Tangled," Disney shocked the world by announcing the film would be their last fairy tale princess story. But while there was much wailing, another, more positive milestone has been somewhat overlooked: "Tangled" marked the studio's 50th animated feature.

We know what you're thinking: Surely Disney has made more than 50 movies, right? And it's true, they have. But if there's one thing Disney knows even more than animation, it's how to protect their brand, which is why they've designated some of their features to be official classics and others -- like "The Jungle Book 2" or "Pete's Dragon" -- to be, you know, just something they do on the side for giggles and grins.

To celebrate the release of "Beauty and the Beast 3D," we review and rank all 50 official Disney animated features. Let the subjectivity begin.

50. 'Brother Bear' (2003)

Hey guys, remember "Brother Bear,
See full article at NextMovie »

'Jack the Giant Killer' trailer: Giants and beanstalks and Ian McShane, oh my!

Can you believe it took Hollywood this long to remake Mickey and the Beanstalk? In the new trailer for Jack the Giant Killer, Mickey Mouse is played by Nicholas Hoult, Donald Duck is played by Ian McShane, and Goofy is played by Ewan McGregor with a hobo accent — I smell Oscar! Nothing I just said is true, although all three actors will indeed appear in next year’s Jack, Bryan Singer’s adrenalized interpretation of the beloved children’s fairy tale about a spry young British lad giving them Cornish giants what for. (Seriously, that’s what it’s about!
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Review: Epic Mickey (Wii)

Disney’s beloved corporate mascot Mickey Mouse finally gets a next-gen video game all of his own with Disney Epic Mickey. Mickey, who was the lead in what are now considered two classic 16-bit console games – Castle of Illusion and World of Illusion – back in the Snes and Megadrive heyday, finally gets to cut loose in a new Wii game that sees Mickey cross the entire of Disney’s historical landscape with a little help from legendary game producer Warren Spector!

In Disney Epic Mickey [you] guide our hero Mickey Mouse through the whimsical Wasteland, home of past Disney cartoon characters and attractions. Using the magical abilities of paint and thinner, Mickey runs and jumps across a vibrant landscape. This imaginary theme park has been pieced together from sketches of never-created attractions, vintage rides and inventive animatronics, and populated by characters that have been forgotten by time. Battling the minions of
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

'Disney Epic Mickey': Are licensed videogames doomed to well-produced mediocrity?

'Disney Epic Mickey': Are licensed videogames doomed to well-produced mediocrity?
I’m now several hours deep into Disney Epic Mickey, the dark-but-not-too-dark fantasy adventure which sends Disney’s icon on a journey through the Waste Land, armed only with a paintbrush. The game is an enjoyable diversion. It features enough contemporary videogame tropes — a “good”/”evil” choice system, motion-control gameplay, a reward system for exploring every nook and cranny of the game’s landscape — to keep you interested. I imagine that a casual gamer would enjoy the game a little for about five hours, and a five-year-old would absolutely love the game for about two hours. For the rest of us,
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

[DVD Review] Walt Disney Animation Collection: Volume 7: Mickey's Christmas Carol

When Disney released the first six volumes of its Animation Collections it wasn’t surprising to see Mickey and the Beanstalk or The Prince and the Pauper headlining two of the releases. After all, they represented two of the crown jewels of Disney’s short films collection. What was alarming was the omission of Mickey’s Christmas Carol, the beautifully animated take on Dickens’ seminal classic using some of the best old time Disney characters. There are a precious few animated Christmas films worthy of annual viewing. Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer and Merry Christmas Charlie Brown are two of them and Mickey’s Christmas Carol rounds out the trio.

Mickey’s Christmas Carol (1983)

Directed by Burny Mattinson and written by Burny Mattinson and Tony Marino

Starring Alan Young, Wayne Allwine, Hal Smith, Will Ryan, Eddie Carroll, Patricia Parris, Dick Billingsley

Ebenezer Scrooge, ghosts of Christmas past, present and future
See full article at JustPressPlay »

[DVD Review] Walt Disney Animation Collection: Volume 6: The Reluctant Dragon

The sixth and final volume of the Disney Classic Short Films collection finally found a way to load a disc with cartoons of genuinely similar moral themes. While Mickey and the Beanstalk did well in that regard as far as plots are concerned, the cartoons accompanying The Reluctant Dragon all take a different stance on identity and what it means to measure expectations of who people think you should be against who you actually are. Each of the cartoons does this in its own way – some more deftly than others. While more consistently thematically, it’s also worth noting that the average age of the four cartoons in this set is noticeably lower than those in other volumes; where volumes 1-5 each had about 2-4 cartoons from the mid 1930s, this volume has but one – and its 1938 creation date gives it a stylistic leg up over its 1933/1934 brethren of past volumes.
See full article at JustPressPlay »

See also

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