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The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

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Gandalf and Aragorn lead the World of Men against Sauron's army to draw his gaze from Frodo and Sam as they approach Mount Doom with the One Ring.

Director:

Peter Jackson

Writers:

J.R.R. Tolkien (novel), Fran Walsh (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Popularity
234 ( 30)

Could Jake Gyllenhaal Save Middle-earth?

It's been 15 years since the Lord of the Rings trilogy ended, but we still can't get enough. Let's look at the stars who missed out on adventures in Middle-earth.

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Top Rated Movies #7 | Won 11 Oscars. Another 198 wins & 122 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Noel Appleby Noel Appleby ... Everard Proudfoot
Ali Astin ... Elanor Gamgee (as Alexandra Astin)
Sean Astin ... Sam
David Aston ... Gondorian Soldier 3
John Bach ... Madril
Sean Bean ... Boromir
Cate Blanchett ... Galadriel
Orlando Bloom ... Legolas
Billy Boyd ... Pippin
Sadwyn Brophy Sadwyn Brophy ... Eldarion
Alistair Browning ... Damrod
Marton Csokas ... Celeborn
Richard Edge Richard Edge ... Gondorian Soldier 1
Jason Fitch ... Uruk 2
Bernard Hill ... Theoden
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Storyline

The final confrontation between the forces of good and evil fighting for control of the future of Middle-earth. Frodo and Sam reach Mordor in their quest to destroy the One Ring, while Aragorn leads the forces of good against Sauron's evil army at the stone city of Minas Tirith. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

orc | epic | battle | journey | hobbit | See All (476) »

Taglines:

This Christmas the journey ends. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for intense epic battle sequences and frightening images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

New Zealand | USA

Release Date:

17 December 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Return of the King See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$94,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$72,629,713, 21 December 2003

Gross USA:

$377,845,905

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,120,424,614
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Blu-Ray Extended Edition) | (Special DVD Extended Edition) | (DVD Widescreen Edition)

Sound Mix:

DTS-ES | Dolby Digital EX | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The original design for the Witch-king of Angmar featured a helmet that resembled a bucket with a crown of spikes on top. However, after watching test footage, the producers thought it looked confusingly similar to Sauron's helmet from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001). The redesign was made to pay homage to the Ringwraith designs. In addition, they also redesigned the Witch-king's flail. Peter Jackson said the original flail was okay, but he wanted it bigger. Weta workshop enlarged it, but Jackson wanted it bigger, so they made it bigger. In the end, it was so large and heavy, it had lost practical use for the fight scenes, in which it was replaced by a digital version. See more »

Goofs

When Smegol/Gollom is plotting the hobbits' demise by talking to his reflection in the river he coughs and dribbles. As his face is directly above his reflection the spit should drop directly onto it but it drops 'downward' as if he were upright. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Deagol: Smeagol, I've got one! I've got a fish, Smeag. Smeagol!
Smeagol: Pull it in. Go on. Go on. Go on. Pull it in.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Just like the two previous "Lord of the Rings" movies, there are no opening credits after the title has been shown. See more »

Alternate Versions

When Aragorn reveals Anduril to the King of the Dead, some prints of the film has his reply as "That blade was broken", while in other prints his response is "That line was broken." See more »

Connections

Featured in Aragorn's Destiny (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Aragorn's Coronation
Music by Viggo Mortensen
Lyrics by J.R.R. Tolkien
Performed by Viggo Mortensen
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
Part 3: It's Not Really the Thought that Counts
30 November 2007 | by mstomasoSee all my reviews

Just as Peter Jackson felt that LOTR had to be made as one large, three-part, cinematic piece, I decided to write my IMDb review of all three movies as a single, multi-part essay. Click on my screen-name and hit "Chronological" to view my reviews of the Fellowship and Two Towers. I make no guarantees about the quality and consistence of my review, but I do guarantee that these three films offer very high and very consistent quality from beginning to end. The acting, cinematography, art, and direction simply can not be beat.

Which of the three movies is my favorite varies with my mood – and the same holds true for Tolkien's books. When I am immersed in the story, ROTK is my favorite. When I simply want to have fun with the whole experience, I love Fellowship. And when I want something intense, evocative and thoughtful, I go for the Two Towers.

Frodo, Sam and Golem are on their way to Mount Doom and their bodies, nerves, and relationships have borne the greatest burden on middle earth. The rest of the fellowship is rallying to the defense of Minas Tirith, and preparing for even more deadly battles to come.

The heroism and romance are incredibly moving - when was the last time you saw an entire audience leaving a theater after a fantasy movie rubbing their eyes? The sets are breathtaking - even moreso than in the previous two films.

The casting and acting are superb.

The film delivers at every level and is the jewel in the trilogy's well-earned crown.

Return of the King offers a resolution of all of the major story arcs in LOTR. As with the classic Tolkien trilogy, however, you may be able to predict some of what will occur, but never all of it and you'll never guess how you will get there. The same fatalistic and paradoxically unpredictable feeling of Tolkien's grand plots is present throughout ROTK especially. The major theme in ROTK, however, is the varied ways and means of heroism – both intentional and unintended, and Tolkien's examination of sacrifice and heroism is as inspiring as it is subtle. Amazingly, it all comes through in the films.

Even more than the previous two films, Jackson and his writers took liberties with the story-line. Like the others, however, this serves the film better than simple adaptation from one medium to another. By reordering some of the chronology and adding scenes and plot devices which are consistent with Tolkien's world and characterizations, the film-makers actually do a better job of preserving the concepts and themes of the story than they could have with a pure adaptation. The lengthy epilogue in Tolkien's book is greatly reduced, reordered, and somewhat changed in order to work in the film. Some parts actually appear very early in ROTK. And some aspects of Tolkien's epilogue are disclosed in the Two Towers, though not directly depicted. But all of the really important components of the epilogue are, at least strongly implied if not well illustrated in ROTK.


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