6.1/10
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2 user
Lusty adventures of two men and a transvestite young man in times of Rome's Nero.

Writers:

Petronius (book), Rodolfo Sonego
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tina Aumont ... Circe
Don Backy ... Encolpio
Mario Carotenuto Mario Carotenuto ... Eumolpo
Franco Fabrizi ... Ascilto
Graziella Granata Graziella Granata ... Antonia
Valérie Lagrange Valérie Lagrange ... Trifena
Francesco Pau Francesco Pau ... Gitone
Ugo Tognazzi ... Trimalchione
Marguerite H. Boulware Marguerite H. Boulware
Clara Colosimo Clara Colosimo ... Seleuco's Wife
Ermelinda De Felice Ermelinda De Felice ... Trimalchione's Wife
Gustavo D'Arpe Gustavo D'Arpe ... The Rhetorical-Questioning Orator
Antonio De Leo Antonio De Leo
Piero Gerlini Piero Gerlini ... Abinna - Antonia's husband
Franco Gulà Franco Gulà ... (as Franco Gullà)
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Storyline

Lusty adventures of two men and a transvestite young man in times of Rome's Nero.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

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Details

Country:

Italy

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

27 March 1969 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

De Ontaarden See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Arco Film,Cineriz See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

United Artists bought the distribution rights for over a million dollars to keep this film off the market until after the release of "Fellini Satyricon" (_Satyricon (1969)_). See more »

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User Reviews

 
This neglected competitor to the Fellini version deserves to be seen....
3 December 2011 | by ccmiller1492See all my reviews

This neglected competitor to the Fellini version deserves to be seen by virtue of its own merits. The fragment of the original work which is all that remains of Petronius' great satire deals mainly with the excesses of Trimalchio's banquet...and that is fully present here and perhaps even better done. The sequence of the ceiling collapsing dramatically only to surprise the guests with a huge weighty cake is quite priceless, as is the faked death of the host so that everyone has to fawn on the (living) corpse, kissing it in gratitude for it's largess. Don Backy (who resembles Ray Danton) is really outstanding as Encolpio, the main character. His two comrades who support him in the numerous picaresque escapades are also well drawn and much more sympathetic than the more thuggish protagonists in Fellini's reading. There is more depth to them and sadness, too, missing in Fellini. If you like the Fellini version, you should definitely see this one, too. It's every bit as good and in some ways better.


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