(1969– )

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Cine-Sunday: ‘Detective Dee – Mystery of the Phantom Flame’ Review

Stars: Andy Lau, Tony Leung, Catrina Lau, Lee Bingbing, Deng Chao | Written by Chen Kuofu & Lin Qianya | Action Director: Sammo Hung | Directed by Tsui Hark

Review by Baron Fortnightly

“When a series of mysterious murders prevents the inauguration of China’s first Empress, Detective Dee, the greatest investigative mind and Kung Fu Master of his generation, is brought back from exile to embark on a manhunt that will forever change the course of history! With a matchless performance from leading-man Andy Lau (Warlords and House of the Flying Daggers) and breathtaking action from the martial arts director of Ip Man and Ip Man 2, Detective Dee is non-stop, heart-racing entertainment in the highest traditions of Asian Action Cinema.”

Detective Dee: Mystery of the Phantom Flame is a 2010 Chinese martial arts/whodunit movie based on the Chinese folk hero and celebrated Tang Dynasty official Di Renjie, otherwise known as Judge Dee
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Detective Dee And The Mystery Of The Phantom Flame Review - (1-1/2 out of 5 stars)

Review of Detective Dee - Exhaustive, and exhausting, lineup of fight scenes feels silly after a while. This Chinese murder mystery (with a title that sounds like a Scooby Doo episode -- ruh roh) and wannabe epic bursts at the seams with nonstop hand-to-hand combat and is brought further down with the occasional phony-looking stage-set or CGI effects. But unlike its lineup of far superior kung fu predecessors over the past decade-plus -- Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; Hero; House Of Flying Daggers, even May’s True Legend -- Dee’s lack of compelling characters and abstruse storyline had me primarily wondering when it would end. The title character is based on legendary Tang Dynasty official Di Renjie, a real-life judge known in every Chinese household today and made famous in the West by Robert van Gulik’s Judge Dee mystery series, written in the mid-twentieth century.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Detective Dee And The Mystery Of The Phantom Flame Review - (1-1/2 out of 5 stars)

Review of Detective Dee - Exhaustive, and exhausting, lineup of fight scenes feels silly after a while. This Chinese murder mystery (with a title that sounds like a Scooby Doo episode -- ruh roh) and wannabe epic bursts at the seams with nonstop hand-to-hand combat and is brought further down with the occasional phony-looking stage-set or CGI effects. But unlike its lineup of far superior kung fu predecessors over the past decade-plus -- Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; Hero; House Of Flying Daggers, even May’s True Legend -- Dee’s lack of compelling characters and abstruse storyline had me primarily wondering when it would end. The title character is based on legendary Tang Dynasty official Di Renjie, a real-life judge known in every Chinese household today and made famous in the West by Robert van Gulik’s Judge Dee mystery series, written in the mid-twentieth century.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Blu-ray Review: Detective Dee & The Mystery Of The Phantom Flame

As the undisputed king of big-budget wuxia films, Tsui Hark seems to have cherry-picked the cast and crew for his 43rd film, the big budget epic mystery Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame. Loosely based on Robert van Gulik’s series of books centering on Judge Dee, an especially astute investigator working during the Chinese Tang Dynasty, Tsui Hark’s film takes plays fast and loose with history but keeps the set pieces humming and generally doesn’t overstay its welcome until about 90 minutes in. The final stretch is laborious, with an already convoluted plot taking on new strands, while the final showdown, set inside a skyscraper of a Buddha statue, is conceptually impressive but not particularly interesting to watch.

The years is 690 Ad and Chinese history is about to be written as Empress Wu Zetian (Carina Lau) takes the final steps necessary for her to seize
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

DVD Review: Detective Dee – Mystery of the Phantom Flame

Detective Dee – Mystery Of The Phantom Flame

Stars: Andy Lau, Tony Leung, Catrina Lau, Lee Bingbing, Deng Chao | Written by Chen Kuofu & Lin Qianya | Action Director: Sammo Hung | Directed by Tsui Hark

“When a series of mysterious murders prevents the inauguration of China’s first Empress, Detective Dee, the greatest investigative mind and Kung Fu Master of his generation, is brought back from exile to embark on a manhunt that will forever change the course of history! With a matchless performance from leading-man Andy Lau (Warlords and House of the Flying Daggers) and breathtaking action from the martial arts director of Ip Man and Ip Man 2, Detective Dee is non-stop, heart-racing entertainment in the highest traditions of Asian Action Cinema.”

Detective Dee – Mystery of the Phantom Flame is a 2010 Chinese martial arts/whodunit movie based on the Chinese folk hero and celebrated Tang Dynasty official Di Renjie, otherwise known as
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Garfield Morgan obituary

Actor best known for his role in The Sweeney

For decades a versatile figure in regional theatre, both behind and in front of the footlights, the actor Garfield Morgan, who has died aged 78, achieved national recognition as Frank Haskins in the mould-breaking action series The Sweeney (Thames, 1975-78), having spent years playing police officers on screen. He brought narrow eyes and a habitually rueful expression to the role of Haskins, who was continually beset by ulcers and colds and whose somewhat puritanical nature distanced him from his charges, played by John Thaw and Dennis Waterman.

Born and raised in Birmingham, Morgan was initially apprenticed to a dental mechanic. His professional debut was in July 1953, in Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham, as part of the Arena Theatre Company, for the city's sixth summer theatre festival. Also in the company was the future director Clifford Williams.

The following month, Morgan was a founder member of the Marlowe Players,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Garfield Morgan obituary

Actor best known for his role in The Sweeney

For decades a versatile figure in regional theatre, both behind and in front of the footlights, the actor Garfield Morgan, who has died aged 78, achieved national recognition as Frank Haskins in the mould-breaking action series The Sweeney (Thames, 1975-78), having spent years playing police officers on screen. He brought narrow eyes and a habitually rueful expression to the role of Haskins, who was continually beset by ulcers and colds and whose somewhat puritanical nature distanced him from his charges, played by John Thaw and Dennis Waterman.

Born and raised in Birmingham, Morgan was initially apprenticed to a dental mechanic. His professional debut was in July 1953, in Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham, as part of the Arena Theatre Company, for the city's sixth summer theatre festival. Also in the company was the future director Clifford Williams.

The following month, Morgan was a founder member of the Marlowe Players,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

28 Weeks Later Character Actor Garfield Morgan Dies

Garfield Morgan was a leading British character actor in films and television. He made one of his final screen appearances as an ill-fated elderly farmer in the 2007 zombie horror film 28 Weeks Later.

Morgan was born in Birmingham, England, on April 19, 1931. He attended drama school in Birmingham and began performing on the local stage in the early 1950s. He became a prolific television actor later in the decade, with roles in such series as Out of This World, The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre, Undermind, The Saint, The Baron, Out of the Unknown, The Avengers, Department S, My Partner, the Ghost, Paul Temple, and The Persuaders. He was featured as Tao Gan on the ancient Oriental mystery series Judge Dee in 1969, and was the slave master in the 1985 television adaptation of John Christopher’s juvenile sci-fi novel The Tripods: The City of Gold and Lead.

Morgan also appeared in a handful
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

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