Play for Today (1970–1984)
6.5/10
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1 user 2 critic

Beloved Enemy 

A corporation decides to outsource one of their contracts to the U.S.S.R. during the Cold War. As they work with politicians on both sides of the table to keep the story out of the press, they also try to keep the contract.

Director:

Alan Clarke

Writers:

David Leland (screenplay), Charles Levinson (in collaboration with) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Graham Crowden ... Sir Peter
Tony Doyle ... Blake
Oscar Quitak Oscar Quitak ... Teddy Whitaker, M. P.
Steven Berkoff ... Kozlov
George Pravda ... Pervitsky
Richard Bebb Richard Bebb ... Robbie
Jerry Harte Jerry Harte ... Kettner
Malcolm Ingram Malcolm Ingram ... Clive
Edward Dentith ... Bob
Wendy Gifford Wendy Gifford ... Barbara
Laurence Herder ... Boris (as Larry Hoodekoff)
Czeslaw Grocholski Czeslaw Grocholski ... Vasin
Jirí Stanislav Jirí Stanislav ... Russian Interpreter
Philippa Jarvis Philippa Jarvis ... English Interpreter
Eileen Helsby Eileen Helsby ... Maggie
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Storyline

A corporation decides to outsource one of their contracts to the U.S.S.R. during the Cold War. As they work with politicians on both sides of the table to keep the story out of the press, they also try to keep the contract.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

Russian | English

Release Date:

10 February 1981 (UK) See more »

Filming Locations:

England, UK

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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User Reviews

 
Ahead of its time
28 March 2002 | by paulduaneSee all my reviews

Alan Clarke had just made a documentary called 'Vodka-Cola',

about the creeping influence that the big corporations were

gaining over world politics,and I suppose he felt that people

wouldn't really get what the whole thing was about unless he

dramatised it - so we got this remarkable movie. Graham Crowden runs a multinational that wants to expand into

the USSR (still, of course, officially the enemy in 1981). Tony Doyle

is his smoothly thuglike right-hand-man. Steven Berkoff is Doyle's

opposite number in the Russian delegation. We see some

beautifully observed scenes evoking the mind-numbing boredom

of high-level business dealings, contrasted with the foul-mouthed

energy of the behind-the-scenes action. The story really kicks off,

though, when it turns out that the Russians will play along, but only

if the company gives them access to their state-of-the-art laser

technology... which can, of course, be used as weaponry... The film portrays politicians as being alternately bullied and bribed

by big business, ultimately colluding in the destruction of their own

native industries in order to save money for the 'greater good' -

globalisation. All this twenty years before Naomi Klein's 'No Logo'. But I shouldn't make it sound like a dry dissertation of a movie - the

performances, as always with Clarke, are superb, and it's great to

see the late Tony Doyle's powerhouse performance. could British TV ever make something as intellectually challenging

today....?


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