5.9/10
64,733
298 user 137 critic

Shaft (2000)

New York City police detective John Shaft (nephew of the original 1970s detective) goes on a personal mission to make sure the son of a real estate tycoon is brought to justice after a racially-motivated murder.

Director:

John Singleton

Writers:

Ernest Tidyman (novel), John Singleton (story) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
535 ( 366)

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ON DISC
1 win & 13 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Samuel L. Jackson ... John Shaft
Vanessa Williams ... Carmen Vasquez
Jeffrey Wright ... Peoples Hernandez
Christian Bale ... Walter Wade, Jr.
Busta Rhymes ... Rasaan
Dan Hedaya ... Jack Roselli
Toni Collette ... Diane Palmieri
Richard Roundtree ... Uncle John Shaft
Ruben Santiago-Hudson ... Jimmy Groves
Josef Sommer ... Curt Fleming
Lynne Thigpen ... Carla Howard
Philip Bosco ... Walter Wade, Sr.
Pat Hingle ... Hon. Dennis Bradford
Lee Tergesen ... Luger
Daniel von Bargen ... Lt. Kearney (as Daniel Von Bargen)
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Storyline

New York Police Detective John Shaft is the lead detective on a sensitive case, a young black man is severely beaten. The man's companions tell Shaft that their friend humiliated the one who was spouting racial slurs at him. Shaft confronts him and he says he's Walter Wade Jr. , the son of a wealthy man. Shaft finds that he has the ID of a woman who's a waitress at the bar where Wade and the guy who was attacked were. When Wade continues to hurl racist comments, Shaft smacks him. Shaft later learns because of his actions Wade was granted bail and fled. Two years later, Wade returns and Shaft arrests him. At his hearing when the judge grants him bail, that's when Shaft throws his badge at the judge. He then sets out to get Wade by finding the waitress. Wade in the meantime asks a drug dealer named Peoples Hernandez to find the waitress and make sure she doesn't talk. Written by rcs0411@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Still the man, any questions?

Genres:

Action | Crime | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong violence and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

Germany | USA

Language:

English | German | Spanish

Release Date:

16 June 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Shaft Returns See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$46,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$21,714,757, 18 June 2000, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$70,334,258, 22 October 2000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$107,196,498, 28 July 2012
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Peoples goes to see Wade and leaves after making his threat, Jeffrey Wright nearly slips on the broken glass and gets caught by his henchman. This wasn't scripted, but they left it in as a little joke. See more »

Goofs

In the flashback, Diane Palmieri has blood on both sides of her face, with Wade's fingers on her left cheek and his thumb on her right jaw. Presumably, she cleaned her cheek but not her jaw, leaving the spot seen at the beginning of the movie. See more »

Quotes

Luger: [after robbing Walter in disguise] How'd I sound?
John Shaft: How did you sound?
Luger: "Freeze mofo I'll bust a cap in your dome"
John Shaft: You are a pure notorious P.I.G, how much we got?
Luger: [looking through the bag] forty two thousand , it's a lot of cash for a simple murder around here
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Eagle Eye (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Quien es Fulanito
by Rafael Vargas, Winston Rosa and Paul Anka
Performed by Fulanito
Courtesy of Cutting Records, Inc.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Oddly mainstream for a blaxploitation flick, but Jackson is great and the total is fun and solid
9 March 2013 | by secondtakeSee all my reviews

Shaft (2000)

This comes so far after the original "Shaft" in 1971 you might hesitate to call it a sequel. It's more like a revival, or a nostalgic time trip. Except that it's all been updated nicely, with a feeling of the original sassiness intact. And the Isaac Hayes music is central, and terrific, making this a legit Shaft movie.

Samuel Jackson plays the role perfectly, not pulling back and not overdoing it. The idea of a black cop in a city that still has racial biases, in this case emphasizing the rise of Latino drug lords as part of the fracturing, is mainstreamed here. It's not as daring or shocking to see this pushed forward, but it's still effective. Shaft, the main character (who never seems to have a first name), is powerful, smart, and unwilling to be pushed around by authority. Even if it means losing his job (or quitting--Shaft is always the one making his own choices).

The director, John Singleton, is not especially well positioned for a mainstream sequel with high production values (his one famous effort to date is "Boyz n the Hood"), but he pulls it off. This is a snappy, smart, well made movie. It's oddly mainstream, playing with clichés too easily, working with bad guy good guy tenets adding only the minor twist of racial or ethnic alliances, though even these we've seen before. You can't help but see "Jackie Brown" from three years earlier as a far more interesting, well made, and timely movie. That one was by Quentin Tarantino, which changes the score a bit, but it starred Jackson, again, and makes the most of him.

You might say Singleton makes the most of Jackson here, too, but a better way to look at it is that Jackson makes the most of Singleton. He takes over the movie, and it's a good thing. He has talent and presence in a classic Hollywood acting way. The cast around him is really strong, which is nice. (There is a cameo by the original director of the 1971 "Shaft," Gordon Parks, in a bar scene, if you are lucky--a white haired older black man at the table.)

The other terrific actor is Jeffrey Wright, playing a drug king with enough realism and panache to make it real and glitzy both. The third main character is the future Batman, Christian Bale, who is a great bad guy and who you actually miss in the last parts of the movie.

What really brings this down to earth, and too much so, is the story, which is boilerplate stuff. There is machismo, and guns, and a play of one bad guy against another, and one cop against another. You might say, hey, isn't there room for more cop and crime movies that work in familiar circles? Yes. But I again refer to "Jackie Brown" as a way to see out of this box.

This new "Shaft" is good stuff--it's well acted, tightly edited, directed with professional canny (noticeable in lots of different ways), and brings up racial clichés in a fun and even important way. It descends by the last third into overused chase and shoot scenes between cops and robbers. But...it's better than its reputation, for sure. I say see it. Enjoy the attitudes. The acting. And the homage to the original.


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