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New York City police detective John Shaft (nephew of the original 1970s detective) goes on a personal mission to make sure the son of a real estate tycoon is brought to justice after a racially-motivated murder.

Director:

John Singleton

Writers:

Ernest Tidyman (novel), John Singleton (story) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
3,918 ( 1,295)

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ON DISC
1 win & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Samuel L. Jackson ... John Shaft
Vanessa Williams ... Carmen Vasquez
Jeffrey Wright ... Peoples Hernandez
Christian Bale ... Walter Wade, Jr.
Busta Rhymes ... Rasaan
Dan Hedaya ... Jack Roselli
Toni Collette ... Diane Palmieri
Richard Roundtree ... Uncle John Shaft
Ruben Santiago-Hudson ... Jimmy Groves
Josef Sommer ... Curt Fleming
Lynne Thigpen ... Carla Howard
Philip Bosco ... Walter Wade, Sr.
Pat Hingle ... Hon. Dennis Bradford
Lee Tergesen ... Luger
Daniel von Bargen ... Lt. Kearney (as Daniel Von Bargen)
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Storyline

New York Police Detective John Shaft is the lead detective on a sensitive case, a young black man is severely beaten. The man's companions tell Shaft that their friend humiliated the one who was sprouting racial slurs at him. Shaft confronts him and he says he's Walter Wade Jr. , the son of a wealthy man. Shaft finds that he has the id of a woman who's a waitress at the bar where Wade and the guy who was attacked were. When Wade continues to hurl racist comments, Shaft smacks him. Shaft later learns because of his actions Wade was granted bail and fled. Two years later, Wade returns and Shaft arrests him. At his hearing when the judge grants him bail, that's when Shaft throws his badge at the judge. He then sets out to get Wade by finding the waitress. Wade in the meantime asks a drug dealer named Peoples Hernandez to find the waitress and make sure she doesn't talk. Written by rcs0411@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Still the man, any questions?

Genres:

Action | Crime | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong violence and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Filmax (Spanish) | Paramount

Country:

Germany | USA

Language:

English | German | Spanish

Release Date:

16 June 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Shaft Returns See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$46,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$21,714,757, 18 June 2000, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$70,334,258, 22 October 2000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$107,196,498, 28 July 2012
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Shaft wears a total of nine different coats during the course of the movie, all of them black. See more »

Goofs

In the beginning, the victim has been bludgeoned in the back of the neck. However, in the flashback, Walter hits him almost dead on in the face. Even within the flashback there is an error; from one angle the victim is quarter turned to face Walter, the next shot he is completely turned around. See more »

Quotes

Uncle John Shaft: You're too hot, man. You gotta step off a bit.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Missing Reel: Blaxploitation (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Quien es Fulanito
by Rafael Vargas, Winston Rosa and Paul Anka
Performed by Fulanito
Courtesy of Cutting Records, Inc.
See more »

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User Reviews

lively homage
13 January 2001 | by Buddy-51See all my reviews

Samuel L. Jackson seems to be having the time of his movie acting life portraying the title character in `Shaft,' John Singleton's take on the groundbreaking classic that, on its release in 1971, served as the blueprint for all the `blaxploitation' films that filled theatres throughout the early and mid 1970's. Unfortunately, the concept of a rogue black cop, defying the rules and doing things his own way, is not as fresh as it was back in the time of the original film, so this new version of `Shaft' has less to recommend it. Still, it is an efficient police procedural, filled with crowd-pleasing moments of adrenalin-pumping melodrama, hissable villains and a wisecracking, kickass hero who seems virtually indestructible – just the way we like our heroes to be in a movie like this.

Singleton pays affectionate homage to the original film in many ways. Jackson actually plays the nephew of the original Shaft and, indeed, Richard Roundtree makes a cameo appearance early on in the film as Jackson's seasoned mentor. Singleton wisely uses the original Isaac Hayes recording of the hit song as background for the film's opening credit sequence and backs up many of the action scenes with an impressive instrumental interpretation as well.

The story offers little that is new for this particular genre whose films often rise or fall based on the quality of the foils against whom the hero must ultimately contend. Luckily, the filmmakers are blessed with not just one but two impressive villains – Jeffrey Wright as Peoples Hernandez, a tough talking thug who wants to expand out of the little neighborhood kingdom he has established into the big time of upper class drug dealing, and Christian Bale as Walter Wade, Jr., the racist, spoiled-brat son of a New York City magnate whose hate crime killing of an innocent black man sets the plot in motion and serves as fodder for Shaft's personal vendetta. Bale proves definitively that the quality of subtle, soul-cringing evil he brought to his role in `American Psycho' was no fluke and that he can be as effective in a big budget extravaganza like this one as he is in a smaller scale, far more quirky work like `Psycho.' Vanessa Williams, on the other hand, who plays Shaft's partner and who is almost unrecognizable buried under a dark beret, fails to distinguish herself either in her role or in her performance.

Then we have Mr. Jackson himself. Here is a man who slides so effortlessly into the role that, despite the absurdity and incredibility of much that is going on around him, we never question the film's veracity for a moment. Whether tossing off wisecracks, shooting at unarmed criminals, pounding defenseless suspects into insensibility or consoling distraught witnesses, Shaft remains forever a hero, acting out the impulses we in the audience feel but are never able to fully act upon in our daily lives. Thus, this new `Shaft' works best as simpleminded good vs. evil melodrama – and even the most sophisticated movie watcher can use a bit of that once in a while.


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