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Rules of Engagement (2000)

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An attorney defends an officer on trial for ordering his troops to fire on civilians after they stormed a U.S. embassy in a third world country.

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(story) (as James Webb), (screenplay)
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Hodges
... Childers
... Major Biggs
... Mourain
... Sokal
... Mrs. Mourain
... Captain Lee
... General Hodges
... General Perry
... Doctor Ahmar
... Tom Chandler
... Judge
Baoan Coleman ... Colonel Cao
... Hayes III
... Corporal Hustings
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Storyline

Hayes Hodges finds his career aspirations dashed when he's wounded in Vietnam combat. He then returns to America and becomes a disillusioned lawyer who goes up against the service to defend Colonel Terry Childers, who is accused of inciting an incident that leaves many demonstrators dead. Hodges in no position to decline: Childers heroically saved his life back in Vietnam. Written by Ronos

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A hero should never have to stand alone.

Genres:

Drama | Thriller | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for scenes of war violence, and for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

| | |

Language:

|

Release Date:

7 April 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Reglas de combate  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$60,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$15,011,181, 9 April 2000, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$61,335,230

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$71,732,303
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

|

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was originally supposed to star Sylvester Stallone and Richard Gere. See more »

Goofs

When Hodge is talking to his father in the garage, he screws a wing nut down on the air cleaner of the antique truck twice between shots. See more »

Quotes

Colonel Terry L. Childers: Listen... when I turned 18, I joined the Marine Corps, I ASKED to be in the Infantry, I ASKED to go to Vietnam...
Colonel Hayes Hodges: Terry...
Colonel Terry L. Childers: I live for the privelidge of commanding troops, I think it's the greatest honor an American can have...
Colonel Hayes Hodges: Terry...
Colonel Terry L. Childers: Do you know how many birthdays and Christmases I missed spent rotting in jungles or in the desert just so you could play war at ROTC?
Colonel Hayes Hodges: CHILDERS! You got to keep your shit together here, man. Your court martial boys is going to be made up of people who might have ...
[...]
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Connections

References Dead Poets Society (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

On the Threshold of Liberty
by Mark Isham
Contains a sample performed by Mark Isham
Courtesy of The Windham Hill Group
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User Reviews

Interesting but too simplistic and lacking in courtroom sparks
14 November 2003 | by See all my reviews

Years have past since Col Hodges and Col Childers were comrades in combat. Hodges is now retired while Childers is still on active service in the Middle East. When he is called in to help protect and evacuate the US Embassy in the middle of a riot, Childers orders his men to return fire despite not having any definite targets. With a crowd of 80 dead, many women and children, the authorities are forced to go after Childers to have someone to blame. Childers turns to his old friend to help defend him.

With a pair of real heavyweights in lead roles I was quite looking forward to this film. It is quite easy to get into the film as the opening 40 minutes are pretty exciting and shocking in equal measure – it forces you to think where you stand on the action taken by Childers in both past and present. However as the film goes on the moral debate becomes simplified and it is clear where we are being steered, as opposed to being allowed to think things out for ourselves. The `debate' or thoughtful side is lost and we are left with the courtroom drama side of things.

I'm not a big fan of courtroom thrillers as they often rely on unlikely twists at the end and lots of shouting in place of substance. However I do enjoy the odd one if it hangs together and has energy. However, the courtroom scenes here never really get off the ground and surprisingly (given the emotive subject) really lack energy and twists. Even the conclusion of the film is a real damp squid, the verdict is simply delivered, so if you're expecting twists and turns and big revelations forget it. Inexplicably, the film puts up two or three captions over the final shot to tell us more information – for some of these the film would have been much more exciting if it had worked these into the final 20 minutes of the film. To have them as flat words on a screen is pointless (especially since this isn't a true story!).

Jones and Jackson both do good work, as you'd expect for a pair of tough nuts such as they. Jackson has the better character (until the script weakens itself). Pearce is OK in support but the script doesn't give him too much to work with, his side of the case is easy of course, so the film stops him overpowering the court case at the same time as it simplifies it's stance. Support from faces such as Kingsley, Archer, Greenwood and Underwood is OK but in some cases are so brief to be cameos.

Overall this starts well, but it fairs to really involve once the moral debate side of the film is simplified and phased out. The question `what would you do' is rendered null and void with each flashback Jackson has. The courtroom scenes barely fizzle let alone ignite the screen and the film putters to a poor ending that is badly done. Worth seeing with good performances from the leads but still a pretty big disappointment.


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