No Hiding Place (1959) - News Poster

(1959–1967)

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The BFI’s “Missing Believed Wiped” season gets horrific!

The BFI’s Missing Believed Wiped returns to BFI Southbank this December to present British television rediscoveries, not seen by audiences for decades, most since their original transmission dates…. The bespoke line-up of TV gems feature some of the countries most-loved television celebrities and iconic characters including Alf Garnett in Till Death Us Do Part: Sex Before Marriage, Cilla Black in her eponymous BBC show featuring Dudley Moore , Jimmy Edwards in Whack-o!, a rare interview with Peter Davison about playing Doctor Who, an appearance by future Doctor Who Patrick Troughton from ITV’s early police drama, No Hiding Place plus a significant screen debut from a young Pete Postlethwaite.

However for Nerdly readers, one of the real highlights of this edition of Missing Believed Wiped is the uncovering of TV horror Late Night Horror: The Corpse Can’t Play. Originally broadcast on 3 May, 1968 on BBC2 this is the only
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'Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?': Tube Talk Gold

Tube Talk Gold is all about nostalgia, but rarely are the shows we cover in this feature actually *about* nostalgia - that feeling of looking at the past through rose-tinted specs. This week's entry is an exception - the only thing to look forward to was the past in BBC One's classic '70s sitcom Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?

Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? - Originally broadcast from January 9, 1973 – December 24 1974

© Rex Features / Moviestore Collection

Acclaimed writing duo Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais are responsible for a number of shows that could easily be granted Tube Talk Gold status - Porridge, Lovejoy and Auf Wiedersehen, Pet are among their most fondly-remembered works - but their first major UK TV offering was the warm and witty working-class sitcom The Likely Lads.

The sitcom, which ran for three series between December 1964 and July 1966, followed two young men from Newcastle upon Tyne - smart-mouthed,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Nia Jones on Frenzy

We asked members of the guardian.co.uk/film community to tell us about their preferred films from the master of suspense. Today's contribution is from Nia Jones, a freelance writer

Ron Goodwin's musical score beats proudly during Frenzy's opening credits, as an aerial shot takes us over London and towards Tower Bridge. Hitch gets his trademark cameo in early, sporting a black suit and a bowler hat, poised in the crowd as Sir George (John Boxer) delivers a speech to a riverside crowd.

The naked body of a woman is soon seen floating in the Thames, a tie knotted around her throat. "The Necktie Murderer" is at large, and Scotland Yard has the crimes pinned on innocent man Richard Blaney (Jon Finch). Finding the actual murderer and exacting revenge is Blaney's only path to salvation.

Based on Arthur La Bern's novel Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Paul Massie obituary

Actor turned teacher, he quit the screen at the height of his fame

There are some actors who, having disappeared from the public gaze early in their careers, always prompt the question, "Whatever happened to ... ?" The answer, in the case of Paul Massie, who has died of lung cancer aged 78, is that, at the height of his fame on films and television, he gave it up at the age of 40 to teach drama at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

The son of a Baptist minister, Massie was born Arthur Massé in the city of St Catharines, in the Niagara region of Ontario. Although he was brought up in Canada, almost his entire 16-year acting career was in Britain. In fact, the only film he made in Canada was his first, Philip Leacock's High Tide at Noon (1957), a Rank Organisation melodrama shot in Nova Scotia. Although it was a bit part,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Terence Longdon obituary

Distinctive, durable British character actor on stage and screen

Terence Longdon, who has died of cancer aged 88, was a character actor whose parted hair and thick-set face – though not his name – were familiar for several decades. Only once did he step into the spotlight at the top of the bill, when he starred as the title character in the television series Garry Halliday (1959-62). The almost-forgotten BBC children's adventure programme, based on books by Justin Blake, perfectly fitted Longdon's educated, smooth, well-mannered persona – and a man who had flown with the Fleet Air Arm during the second world war. The actor played a Biggles-like commercial airline pilot, with Terence Alexander as his co-pilot, Bill Dodds. Posing a constant threat to the Halliday Charter Company was "The Voice", an arch-villain who sat behind a two-way mirror and shone a light into the faces of his gang members, keeping his own in darkness.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Terence Longdon obituary

Distinctive, durable British character actor on stage and screen

Terence Longdon, who has died of cancer aged 88, was a character actor whose parted hair and thick-set face – though not his name – were familiar for several decades. Only once did he step into the spotlight at the top of the bill, when he starred as the title character in the television series Garry Halliday (1959-62). The almost-forgotten BBC children's adventure programme, based on books by Justin Blake, perfectly fitted Longdon's educated, smooth, well-mannered persona – and a man who had flown with the Fleet Air Arm during the second world war. The actor played a Biggles-like commercial airline pilot, with Terence Alexander as his co-pilot, Bill Dodds. Posing a constant threat to the Halliday Charter Company was "The Voice", an arch-villain who sat behind a two-way mirror and shone a light into the faces of his gang members, keeping his own in darkness.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Angela Scoular obituary

Wuthering Heights star, Bond girl and Leslie Phillips's wife

Angela Scoular, who has died aged 65 after reportedly taking her own life, was known as the wife of the actor Leslie Phillips, but she also had several acting roles of her own that brought her public attention.

She twice played a "Bond girl". First, she took the part of Buttercup, sharing a bath with David Niven as James Bond, in the spoof, "unofficial" release Casino Royale (1966). Then she was the flirtatious farmer's daughter Ruby, bedded by once-only-007 George Lazenby, in On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), which also featured the former Avenger Diana Rigg and the future New Avenger Joanna Lumley.

Scoular later had a regular role as Lady Agatha Shawcross in You Rang, M'Lord? the "upstairs, downstairs" sitcom set in the 1920s, from the Dad's Army creators Jimmy Perry and David Croft. As the mistress of Lord Meldrum (Donald Hewlett
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Louis Marks obituary

Writer and producer behind a string of television classics

Louis Marks, who has died aged 82, was a writer for some of British television's most popular series and the producer of acclaimed single plays and a six-part adaptation in 1994 of George Eliot's Middlemarch. Marks also scripted four Doctor Who adventures, including The Day of the Daleks (1972), with Jon Pertwee as the Doctor, which introduced the Ogrons as the footsoldiers of the daleks. A scholar of the Italian Renaissance, he transported the fourth incarnation of the Time Lord, played by Tom Baker, to 15th-century Italy for the 1976 adventure The Masque of Mandragora. His script drew on influences such as a Machiavellian comedy, a book-burning priest and the musical surnames Rossini and Scarlatti.

Marks was born in Golders Green, north London, the son of a Jewish jeweller. After attending Christ's college, East Finchley, he read history at Balliol College, Oxford. He then
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Doctor Who complete reviews: The Moonbase

  • Shadowlocked
Remakes. Who needs ‘em? Seems not a day goes by that some classic film or TV programme is being lined up for a remake. Psycho. Cape Fear. Even the classic Likely Lads episode “No Hiding Place” got a 21st century makeover with…Ant and Dec replacing Rodney Bewes and James Bolam. Underwhelming’s a slight understatement here.

Even in Doctor Who, remakes are produced, albeit with a different name. Take The Christmas Invasion, a thinly-veiled retread of the Slitheen two-parter in the previous season. Both plots concern the apparent first contact with an alien race. Both plots include a sideshow alien (The augmented pig and the Robot Santas). And both boast enough political allegory to make Jeremy Paxman launch into one of his monotonous diatribes. For all that, though, The Christmas Invasion is one of those rare occasions when the remake surpasses the original. It’s tightly plotted. It’s exciting.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

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