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‘Breath’ Review: A Wistful Coming of Age Story about Surfing, Surrender, and Erotic Asphyxiation

‘Breath’ Review: A Wistful Coming of Age Story about Surfing, Surrender, and Erotic Asphyxiation
Breath” is a wistful and wounded coming-of-age story about surfing, surrender, and the sordid experience of losing your virginity to a married older woman who’s got a thing for erotic asphyxiation. The movie is able to ride a line right through so many of its genre’s worst clichés because it never stops negotiating between fear and desire, risk and reward. It’s an assured directorial debut from “The Mentalist” actor Simon Baker, who — after 12 long years — has finally done something more impressive than getting Anne Hathaway those “Harry Potter” manuscripts in “The Devil Wears Prada.”

Breath” doesn’t spend that much time on the water, but it reckons with each wave — from ankle-busters to groundswells — and every single one of them dares these young protagonists to prove something to themselves. Without belaboring the point, or betraying the soft touch of the Tom Winton novel on which his film is based,
See full article at Indiewire »

Scores on Screen. Clouds Up: Air and the Soundtrack of "The Virgin Suicides"

Scores on Screen is a column by Clare Nina Norelli on film soundtracks.“I think that we wrote the spirit — the musical spirit — that [Sofia Coppola] had needed for her movie.”–Jean-Benoît Dunckel (Air)1The Virgin Suicides (1999) opens with a blonde teen-aged girl standing in the middle of a suburban street eating a popsicle. She is looking out past the camera, appears simultaneously bored and amused, and is surrounded by the familiar sounds of imminent dusk: birds chirping, the hiss of sprinklers, the bark of a dog, the elongated buzz of crickets, and a child’s shouts. Underneath this chorus of the everyday, a grave electric organ-driven dirge on the soundtrack invests the otherwise commonplace scene with an eerie solemnity. The girl moves off camera and, amidst the golden hues of sunlight flickering through tree branches, we are shown other residents of her neighborhood going about their afternoons, their faces obscured,
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Jonathan Tucker Is in Westworld Now, and We're Not Mad About It

Image Source: HBO

Westworld gained a new villain in the second episode of season two, titled "Reunion," when Dolores tracks down Major Craddock and uses her considerable powers of persuasion - by which we mean total fearlessness and badassery - to get Craddock and his men to follow her to "Glory."

If Craddock looks familiar to you, there's a reason for that. Jonathan Tucker is one of the actors who very quickly seems to have appeared all over the small-screen landscape (though he did have a noteworthy role in The Virgin Suicides when he was just 16 years old).

Related: Westworld's Season 2 Premiere Finally Reveals the Park's Mysterious Location

About 10 years ago, Tucker starred on the short-lived NBC drama The Black Donnellys, about an Irish family in New York that gets caught up in organized crime. After that was canceled, Tucker appeared in small roles on a ton of shows
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Sofia Coppola Talks The Teenage Dream Of Her Striking ‘Virgin Suicides’ Debut [Interview]

Sofia Coppola‘s striking debut feature “The Virgin Suicides,” was a type of cotillion in its day: an coming out announcement signaling the arrival of a remarkable new feminine voice in cinema, and a new auteur that was here to stay. The daughter of the legendary Francis Ford Coppola, the young Sofia, then 28-years-old, may have had filmmaking in her blood, traveling on film sets all her life, but with “The Virgin Suicides,” it was clear her singular vision was already full-formed and completely unique.
See full article at The Playlist »

Soundtracking: "The Virgin Suicides"

Chris looks at the music of Sofia Coppola's debut, now a part of The Criterion Collection.

Time has been kind to Sofia Coppola The Virgin Suicides, as effective a critique on the male gaze as anything else in the past twenty years. In Coppola’s gauzy vision of its central Lisbon sisters (as told by neighborhood boys) is a reflection of male idolatry that ignores the voice and emotional reality of real women. While the film is typically remembered for how it visually creates this perspective, it also uses music in interesting ways to subvert male self-serving worship.

The film is haunted by Air’s “Playground Love”, it’s most evocative and film-defining musical passage. It’s an apt song choice, one that tempts you into its pull like the tumble into a teenage crush, all jazzy hormones mired in lyrical thinness. And yet despite its temptation and seemingly feminine sway,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Sofia Coppola: Paramount Classics Feared ‘Virgin Suicides’ Release Would Encourage Girls to Commit Suicide

Sofia Coppola: Paramount Classics Feared ‘Virgin Suicides’ Release Would Encourage Girls to Commit Suicide
The Virgin Suicides” is often listed among the greatest coming-of-age films ever made, and this month finds the drama making history as the first Sofia Coppola film to become a member of The Criterion Collection. The filmmaker marked the occasion by sitting down for a new interview with Entertainment Weekly. Coppola remembered not being entirely pleased with the movie’s 2000 theatrical release, noting that distributor Paramount Classics was unsure how to handle the film’s release 18 years ago.

“It didn’t have much of a release,” Coppola said. “Paramount Classics didn’t really know what to do with it. They were afraid that girls were going to commit suicide if they saw it! It had a really small release. We made it for very little, so they didn’t have to do much to make it.”

The film was hardly a box office hit at the time of release, grossing
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Westworld Season 2: What We Know & What’s to Come

The season 1 finale of Westworld was shockingly badass to say the very least, and while there were certain payoffs to various storylines that had been building throughout the first 10 episodes, it also raised a bunch of questions as to just where exactly the story will be heading in season 2. So, in anticipation of this weekend’s premiere episode on HBO, here’s a look at what we know so far about Westworld and what we’re hoping to see during this new season, which kicks off Sunday night at 9:00pm Est.

[Spoiler Warning: If you haven’t seen any of Westworld Season 1, the following does contain some spoilers, so you may want to catch up with the series first before reading on.]

Fresh Blood: While we haven’t seen them in action yet, Westworld expands its cast with six newcomers for season 2, including the always great Betty Gabriel, Jonathan Tucker, Fares Fares, Gustaf Skarsgård, Katja Herbers (The Leftovers), and Neil Jackson.
See full article at DailyDead »

Eat the Rich: Close-Up on Sofia Coppola’s "Marie Antoinette"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette (2006) is showing from April 8 - May 8, 2018 in the United Kingdom.In 2006, Juicy Couture, the clothing brand synonymous with velour tracksuits, released their first fragrance. Instantly beloved by teen girls, available at Walmart, Juicy Couture’s eponymous fragrance smells like tropical punch with base notes of dessert tray—synthetic aromas that choked high school hallways for at least half a decade hence. The print campaign for the fragrance features pastel hues, ribbons, puppies, and a rebellious rococo wardrobe. In it, a model wears a towering, cotton candy wig—as if she not only smells but is also slowly becoming edible. That same year, Sofia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. Similarities between this historic-ish film and the Juicy Couture ad campaign are striking. Depending on who you talk to, Marie Antoinette
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The Virgin Suicides

Sofia Coppola’s first feature film is a head-swirling poetic essay about adolescent angst and terminal self-destruction in suburbia, where some families are unbalanced, others are dysfunctional and some are just plain toxic. Coppola sticks close to the source book, looking for visuals to express author Jeffrey Eugenides’ solution-challenged mystery, narrated by a composite group of teenaged boys.

The Virgin Suicides

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 920

1999 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 97 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date April 24, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Kirsten Dunst, A. J. Cook, Hanna Hall, Leslie Hayman, Chelse Swain, James Woods, Kathleen Turner, Josh Hartnett, Michael Paré, Scott Glenn, Danny DeVito, Giovanni Ribisi.

Cinematography: Ed Lachman

Film Editor: Melissa Kent, James Lyons

Original Music: Air

From the novel by Jeffrey Eugenides

Produced by Francis Ford Coppola, Julie Costanzo, Dan Halsted, Chris Hanley

Written and Directed by Sofia Coppola

At the finale of the Apocalypse Now documentary Hearts of Darkness Francis
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‘Picnic At Hanging Rock’ Trailer: Influential 1975 Film Gets Remade For Amazon With Natalie Dormer

The 1975 film “Picnic at Hanging Rock,” directed by Peter Weir, is a film that is often cited as a huge influence on filmmakers. Acclaimed director Sofia Coppola is said to have borrowed quite a bit for her films, “The Virgin Suicides” and “Marie Antoinette.” Damon Lindelof has credited the film as an influence on his second season of “The Leftovers.” So, we’re definitely excited to see what Amazon has in store when it releases it’s “Picnic at Hanging Rock” limited series later this year.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ Series Trailer Reveals Amazon’s Take on a Creepy Classic

If you haven't seen Peter Weir's Australian classic Picnic at Hanging Rock, go and do so right now. And then come back, May 25th, to see how Amazon is expanding it (and Joan Lindsay's novel) into a limited series. The story revolves around the mysterious disappearance of a group of school girls on Valentine's Day in 1900, while on a walkabout to a nearby outcropping. The 1975 movie is a haunting reverie, and created an aesthetic that has been cribbed by a number of other filmmakers (including Sofia Coppola for movies like The Virgin Suicides and …
See full article at Collider.com »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon
While writer-director Wes Anderson deserves the credit for his chain of impressive features — and his latest, the stop-motion “Isle of Dogs,” marks one of his most vividly charming — he has long relied on a man whom Anderson calls his “Swiss Army knife”: screenwriter Roman Coppola. Anderson and Coppola’s collaboration led to their Original Screenplay Oscar nomination for “Moonrise Kingdom,” but Coppola’s contributions are often lower key; Anderson said he often relies on Roman to keep him on track.

“Roman and I have worked together for many years on an awful lot of movies,” wrote Anderson in an email, “first on ‘The Life Aquatic,’ where he shot numerous strange and complicated shots. Then ‘The Darjeeling Limited’ which we wrote with Jason [Schwartzman]. Then on ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ Roman helped me sort of find a story that I had somehow completely lost track of — and we then dreamed up the whole rest of the movie together.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon
While writer-director Wes Anderson deserves the credit for his chain of impressive features — and his latest, the stop-motion “Isle of Dogs,” marks one of his most vividly charming — he has long relied on a man whom Anderson calls his “Swiss Army knife”: screenwriter Roman Coppola. Anderson and Coppola’s collaboration led to their Original Screenplay Oscar nomination for “Moonrise Kingdom,” but Coppola’s contributions are often lower key; Anderson said he often relies on Roman to keep him on track.

“Roman and I have worked together for many years on an awful lot of movies,” wrote Anderson in an email, “first on ‘The Life Aquatic,’ where he shot numerous strange and complicated shots. Then ‘The Darjeeling Limited’ which we wrote with Jason [Schwartzman]. Then on ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ Roman helped me sort of find a story that I had somehow completely lost track of — and we then dreamed up the whole rest of the movie together.
See full article at Indiewire »

Scalpel – Now Available on Blu-ray From Arrow Video

He Lost The Face Of The Woman He Loved… So He Gave It To Someone Else.

Scalpel (1977) is currently available on Blu-ray from Arrow Video

Us television staple Robert Lansing (Star Trek, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Twilight Zone) stars as a deranged surgeon in this twisty-turny psychological thriller from Blood Rage director John Grissmer.

In Scalpel, Lansing plays Dr. Phillip Reynolds, a man whose daughter Heather (Judith Chapman, As the World Turns, General Hospital) has run away from home a year prior following the suspicious death of her boyfriend. When he happens across a young woman one night, her face beaten beyond recognition, the unhinged Reynolds sees his an opportunity to put his trusty scalpel to use – hatching a plan to ”reconstruct” her face in the image of his missing daughter, and so claim her sizeable inheritance.

Photographed by celebrated cinematographer Edward Lachman, who would go on to serve as
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rushes. Kiarostami's Coda, The Zanzibar Group, Buster Keaton Candid Camera

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.Recommended VIEWINGJanus Films has released a moving trailer for the late master Abbas Kiarostami's final film, 24 Frames. We were touched by this entrancing film at this past year's Cannes Film Festival.Steven Soderbergh's post-"retirement" phase appears to continue with Unsane. Here's the first tantalizing trailer:Travis Wilkerson is one of the best kept secrets in American cinema, thus we're pleased to see that his latest Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? gets a trailer and distribution via Grasshopper Film:The kind people over at NoBudge have presented the online premieres of two inspired independent films: Kat Hunt's What's Revenge, a docu-fiction comedy about ex-boyfriends and gender relations, and Eric Marsh & Andrew Stasiulis' Orders, a contemplation of the American war machine from a haunted suburban setting.Recommended LISTENINGThe Directors Guild
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Sofia Coppola on making The Virgin Suicides: 'When I saw the rough cut I thought: Oh no, what have I done?'

The director relives the creation of her debut film, from the family tragedy that drew her to the story of five sisters taking their lives – to its terrifying Cannes premiere

I grew up with a lot of men. It was me and nine boys, once you count all my brothers and cousins. My dad, Francis Ford Coppola, was a macho film-maker and his friends were all of that ilk, so I think I really clung to femininity and a kind of girly aesthetic.

When I was in my mid-20s, I came across The Virgin Suicides. I remember seeing the cover – it was just all this blonde hair. I read it and loved it. It felt like Jeffrey Eugenides, the writer, really understood the experience of being a teenager: the longing, the melancholy, the mystery between boys and girls. I loved how the boys were so confused by the girls,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sofia Coppola on the film that launched her – The Start podcast

Our new culture podcast, The Start, brings major artists to the mic to reveal how they began their careers. In this first episode, Sofia Coppola talks about the fear and the thrill of directing her debut film, The Virgin Suicides

Subscribe and review on Apple Podcasts or Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

At the 1999 Cannes film festival, attendees watched the work of a little-known 28 year old. That film was The Virgin Suicides, written, directed, and produced by Sofia Coppola. The novel by Jeffrey Eugenides about a doomed family of teenage sisters had resonated so much with the young Sofia she felt compelled to step behind the camera and make her own mark on movies.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Criterion in April 2018: Virgin Suicides, Dead Man and a Bevy of Bergman

Apologies for the lateness of this posting, but since it's just you and me here, devoted fans of classy and extremely well-presented home video, allow me to say: the Criterion Collection's lineup is getting more and more exciting! In April 2018, the company plans to release two strikingly different black and white films: Leo McCarey's wonderful comedy The Awful Truth, starring Cary Grant, Irene Dunne and Ralph Bellamy; and Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man, his first period picture, starring Johnny Depp. Sofia Coppola's strikingly subduedl The Virgin Suicides and Sergei Parajanov's The Color of Pomegranates -- about which I know nothing -- and a bevy of Bergman. The latter is part of Criterion's no-frills Eclipse line and will allow fans of the fab Ingrid Berman to...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘The Virgin Suicides’ & ‘Dead Man’ Coming To Criterion This Spring

The good folks at The Criterion Collection keep coming up with ways to get us to part with our hard earned dollar, and their April lineup is designed to do just that. So let’s roll up our sleeves and dive right in…

Kicking things off is Jim Jarmusch‘s cult favorite “Dead Man.” The Johnny Depp starring existential western won’t be overflowing with extras — poetry readings, interviews, select scene audio commentary — but you’ll want to pay top dollar for the new, 4K restoration so you can soak up every frame of Robby Müller‘s exquisite cinematography, and hear every note of Neil Young‘s score.

Continue reading ‘The Virgin Suicides’ & ‘Dead Man’ Coming To Criterion This Spring at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Criterion Announces ‘The Virgin Suicides’ 4K Restoration, Approved by Ed Lachman and Sofia Coppola

Criterion Announces ‘The Virgin Suicides’ 4K Restoration, Approved by Ed Lachman and Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppla acclaimed directorial debut “The Virgin Suicides” will be joining the Criterion Collection this April with a 4K digital restoration supervised by cinematographer Ed Lachman and approved by Coppola. The release is the highlight of the April 2018 additions, which also include Jim Jarmusch’s “Dead Man,” Sergei Parajanov’s “The Color of Pomegranates,” and Leo McCarey’s “The Awful Truth.”

Read More:Sofia Coppola: How She Survived ‘The Beguiled’ Backlash, Why She Won’t Do TV, and Why Her Dad is ‘Over’ Film

In addition to the 4K restoration, “The Virgin Suicides” Criterion release will also include new interviews with Coppola, actors Kirsten Dunst and Josh Hartnett, author Jeffrey Eugenides, and writer Tavi Gevinson. Coppola’s 1998 short film “Lick the Star” will also be included as a bonus feature, as will a making-of documentary directed by Sofia’s mother, filmmaker Eleanor Coppola. The movie is now available to
See full article at Indiewire »
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