5.9/10
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2 user

Color Scales (1932)

This "Fisherman's Paradise" entry shows various species of tropical fish at the Steinhart Aquarium in San Francisco, California.

Director:

Zion Myers

Star:

Pete Smith
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Pete Smith ... Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

A passenger ship has just arrived in San Francisco from Hawaii. Aboard the ship are not only the passengers, but some native Hawaiians: some tropical fish, destined for aquariums. Several varieties of the fish are shown and described. They will ultimately be going into an environment more hospitable than from where they came since the aquariums will be controlled. The colorful fish are often inspiration for fashion designers who look to what nature provides in terms of color combinations and patterns. Written by Huggo

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Genres:

Documentary | Short

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 April 1932 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A Fisherman's Paradise Picture: Color Scales See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Color (2-strip Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Aloha Oe
Written by Queen Liliuokalani
Performed by studio orchestra
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User Reviews

 
Fish -- for Looking, Not for Eating
23 June 2018 | by bobliptonSee all my reviews

Here's an early Pete Smith narrating credit, one of the "Fisherman's Paradise" series of shorts for MGM. It's a short subject showing some of the exotic fish on exhibit at the Steinhardt Aquarium in San Francisco. Smith's narration is reltively restrained for the sarcastic standards he would later maintain.

Although nowadays most of these specimens are common to many a collector's tank -- the varieties end with goldfish -- this short is most noteworthy for the fact it is shot in some excellent two-strip Technicolor. That is, of course, largely of historical and technical interest these days; the introduction of three-strip Technicolor was just around the color, and a few years later, the Technicolor Corporation would introduce its monopack, making Technicolor production much easier -- although far more expensive than black & white, given the special equipment and higher film cost.


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