4.6/10
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Psycho (1998)

Trailer
1:34 | Trailer
A young female embezzler arrives at the Bates Motel, which has terrible secrets of its own.

Director:

Gus Van Sant

Writers:

Robert Bloch (novel), Joseph Stefano (screenplay)
4 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Vince Vaughn ... Norman Bates
Anne Heche ... Marion Crane
Julianne Moore ... Lila Crane
Viggo Mortensen ... Sam Loomis
William H. Macy ... Milton Arbogast
Robert Forster ... Dr. Simon
Philip Baker Hall ... Sheriff Chambers
Anne Haney ... Mrs. Chambers
Chad Everett ... Tom Cassidy
Rance Howard ... Mr. Lowery
Rita Wilson ... Caroline
James Remar ... Patrolman
James Le Gros ... Car Dealer (as James LeGros)
Steven Clark Pachosa Steven Clark Pachosa ... Police Guard
O.B. Babbs O.B. Babbs ... Mechanic
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Storyline

Marion Crane steals a lot of cash from a man whom her boss is in business with. On the way to see her boyfriend, she stops off by an old motel, run by the odd Norman Bates. She is murdered in the shower. Her sister, boyfriend, and a private investigator try to find out where she is, while we learn more about Norman Bates. Written by Jordan Sharp <rainman88@earthlink.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The classic story of a boy and his mother. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence and sexuality/nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

William H. Macy was quoted as saying that he was so eager to work with director Gus Van Sant that he would have appeared in an adaptation of the phone book if Van Sant was directing. He also said that most people signed on expecting that Van Sant would put his own spin on the movie. Although Macy was very happy with his portrayal, he called the film itself an "ill-begotten picture" because Van Sant decided to make it a faithful remake. See more »

Goofs

When Norman is mopping the bathroom, the mop goes from bloody pink to unbloodied between shots, without rinsing. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Samuel 'Sam' Loomis: You never did eat your lunch, did you?
Marion Crane: I better get back to the office. These extended lunch hours give my boss excess acid.
Samuel 'Sam' Loomis: Why don't you call your boss and tell him you're taking the rest of the afternoon off? Its Friday, anyway - and hot.
Marion Crane: What do I do with my free afternoon? Walk you to the airport?
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Crazy Credits

The ending credits show the police looking around the swamp. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Nostalgia Critic: The Dark Age of Movies (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Indian Love Call
Written by Oscar Hammerstein II, Rudolf Friml and Otto A. Harbach
Performed by Slim Whitman
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User Reviews

 
Shot For Shot....... Except
23 June 2006 | by worldsofdarkblueSee all my reviews

Hitchcock's original classic benefited tremendously not only from the performance of, but also the 'look' of Anthony Perkins. He projected a kind of clean-cut innocence: a young teen-idol type of persona. He was not an actor who had portrayed baddies before this; nor was he physically suited to the role of what the public might have imagined a psychopath to look like, especially in the 50's when this ultra-chilling aspect of mental illness (split personality psychosis) was relatively unexplored in film. Which is exactly why the casting of him as Norman Bates was a slice of true Hitchcockian genius. Audiences were taken by surprise to put it mildly.

That's why this re-make does not work, even a little bit, in spite of trying to be an exact copy. Whereas Anthony Perkins looked like someone you would never think of as being a serial killer, Vince Vaughn is easily imaginable as one. He lacks the frail look of Perkins and his acting chops are clearly inferior as well, at least in this role (honestly - has there ever been an actor who could convey nervousness as genuinely as Anthony Perkins?). While it was a pointless re-make to begin with, the miscasting of the story's most important character sucks this film down completely.

As a side note, I feel that Hollywood's propensity for re-making great movies because 'young' people refuse to watch anything that's not filmed in color not only stinks to high heaven of corporate greed but is exceptionally disrespectful to the original work. As for viewers who can't watch black and white - it's their loss. Hopefully they'll mature sometime in the future and no longer require shiny colours to hold their attention. When they do they'll discover that sometimes black and white works far better. With the background muted, the story and performances are that much more front and center. And in many cases the mood or atmosphere created through black and white cinematography is just not attainable in colour.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 December 1998 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Psycho See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$60,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,031,850, 6 December 1998

Gross USA:

$21,485,655

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$37,170,655
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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