A parade of various animals leads piano-playing Krazy and his likewise opponent, a Lion, to a large, crowded arena where they square off in the boxing ring to play a musical duel. The Lion ... See full summary »

Writer:

George Herriman (comic strip)
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A parade of various animals leads piano-playing Krazy and his likewise opponent, a Lion, to a large, crowded arena where they square off in the boxing ring to play a musical duel. The Lion has an upright piano, and plays a bit though a fly keeps bothering him. Krazy has a grand piano, and plays a little too, but soon it's between rounds, and all four competitors (the pianos are living creatures also) are exhausted. Then the pianos go at it alone in a punch out, Krazy and the victorious Grand start a spirited playing of "St. Louis Blues", and the Lion and Upright join in as well. All take a bow at the end. Written by WesternOne1

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Genres:

Animation | Short

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 June 1930 (USA) See more »

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Screen Gems See more »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono
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In This Corner...
16 April 2015 | by bobliptonSee all my reviews

1930 was a year of musical cartoons. In large part, this was because the cartoon producers had been putting soundtracks onto their cartoons since 1928, but they hadn't figured out how to match words to mouth movements yet. Instead, they offered synchronized cartoons, in which musical soundtracks to take the place of theater accompanists -- just the way the Warner Brothers had sold their sound movies in the first place. Harman & Ising had figured out how to do the coordination necessary for talkie cartoons and had gotten a contract on that basis. The smaller producers were a bit more conservative. They paid for sound effects and they paid for a musical track; there seemed no reason to pay for voice artists when they could continue to make the same sort of cartoon they had in the silent era.

Instead, they worked out cartoons like this one, in which the sound track was the point. In this one, a lion plays classical music (including the earliest use of the "Storm" sequence from the William Tell Overture I've heard in the movies) and Krazy counters with jazz music, including a nice hot version of W.C. Handy's "St. Louis Blues". There are a few gags scattered in, but that's basically it.


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