6.8/10
31
3 user 2 critic

Fifth Ward (1998)

R | | 2006 (France)
Fifth Ward Poster
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1:46 | Trailer

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An African-American male in the ghettos of Houston struggles with opportunities to enter a life of crime including a chance to kill the man who killed his brother.

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2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Kory Washington ... James
Donna Wilkerson ... Mina
... Toney
Thomas Webb ... Earl
Creepa ... Bam
... Haan
Lee Carter ... Rip
JaCorrey Lovelady ... Lil T
Louis Gusemano ... Gibson
Steve Green ... Lindsey
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Black Prince ... Jimmy
Kelley Darbonne ... Secretary
Karman Jones ... Crack Head with a Baby
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Storyline

An African-American male in the ghettos of Houston struggles with opportunities to enter a life of crime including a chance to kill the man who killed his brother.

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Trying to leave the hood can be murder...

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language, drug content and some sexuality
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2006 (France)  »

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5th Ward  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

More of the same...
13 December 2001 | by See all my reviews

...old same old. This story sheds no new light on what has become a tired genre. It's a shame because there's so many stories to tell about inner city life and African-American relationships, but the writer/director of this movie had no imagination and chose to preach the obvious.

The look of the movie is muddy at times because of its low budget. The acting at times good, but most of these unknowns were out of their reach with emotional scenes that felt forced.

Like most movies in the modern ghetto genre, it steals from other films, like Pulp Fiction and Menace 2 Society. The use of "voice over" has become the standard for ghetto movies, because the director feels the need to explain everything to the audience instead of doing the work visually.

When will a director with vision come along and capture African-American life as it is today, without preaching, and pandering to the audience for sympathy for a movie that is poorly made and without any goal other than getting your hard earned cash. Buy this video at your own risk, it's better to catch it on cable.


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