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Pickled Puss (1948)

The cat and mouse are in their usual game of chase-and-pursue until the mouse hides in a pickled-herring barrel. The cat gets intoxicated from inhaling the fumes and immediately becomes the... See full summary »

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The cat and mouse are in their usual game of chase-and-pursue until the mouse hides in a pickled-herring barrel. The cat gets intoxicated from inhaling the fumes and immediately becomes the mouse's newest best friend. He defends the mouse from a mean alley cat, and the mouse invites him to come home with him. There, the mouse takes care of him and sobers him up, and the cat immediately begins to chase him again. He reaches the barrel again and regains his newest best friend. Charlie Chaplin deserves an (uncredited) story listing. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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mouse | cat | friend | best friend | barrel | See All (18) »


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Approved | See all certifications »
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2 September 1948 (USA)  »

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The discarded bottle labeled OLD BOGGS may be a reference to the hard-drinking character, called "old Boggs", in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. See more »

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Happy Drunk
26 September 2013 | by See all my reviews

A bubble-blowing mouse feeds a pursuing cat pickled herring (labeled ninety proof). The cat is a very genial drunk.

this is an amusing cartoon from the brief period when Henry Binder and Raymond Katz -- Leon Schlesinger's old henchmen -- were running Columbia's cartoon department. Columbia didn't have much in the way of series characters except for the Fox and the Crow, so this is clearly a one-shot, but care was taken with its construction, including some very nice point-of-view shots early on.

Despite a first-rate staff, no producer of Columbia cartoons had stuck around for more than a couple of years since Charles Mintz had died. With no steady hand to provide an imprimatur to the cartoons, the division had floundered, despite some promising starts. Eventually, Harry Cohn would close down the division and toss everything to UPA, who would produce a series of cheap and stylish cartoons.


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