6.9/10
112,449
473 user 108 critic

Any Given Sunday (1999)

A behind-the-scenes look at the life-and-death struggles of modern-day gladiators and those who lead them.

Director:

Oliver Stone

Writers:

Daniel Pyne (screen story), John Logan (screen story) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
3,090 ( 996)
3 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Al Pacino ... Tony D'Amato
Cameron Diaz ... Christina Pagniacci
Dennis Quaid ... Jack 'Cap' Rooney
James Woods ... Dr. Harvey Mandrake
Jamie Foxx ... Willie Beamen
LL Cool J ... Julian Washington
Matthew Modine ... Dr. Ollie Powers
Jim Brown ... Montezuma Monroe
Lawrence Taylor ... Luther 'Shark' Lavay
Bill Bellamy ... Jimmy Sanderson
Andrew Bryniarski ... Patrick 'Madman' Kelly
Lela Rochon ... Vanessa Struthers
Lauren Holly ... Cindy Rooney
Ann-Margret ... Margaret Pagniacci
Aaron Eckhart ... Nick Crozier
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Storyline

When a devastating hit knocks a professional football legend and quarterback Cap Rooney out of the game, a young, unknown third-stringer is called in to replace him. Having ridden the bench for years because of a string of bad luck stories and perhaps insufficient character, Willie Beaman seizes what may be his last chance, and lights up the field with a raw display of athletic prowess. His stunning performance over several games is so outstanding and fresh it seems to augur a new era in the history of this Miami franchise, and forces aging coach Tony D'Amato to reevaluate his time-tested values and strategies and begin to confront the fact that the game, as well as post-modern life may be passing him by. Adding to the pressure on D'Amato to win at any cost is the aggressive young President/Co-owner of the team, Christina Pagniacci, now coming into her own after her father's death. Christina's driving desire to prove herself in a male dominated world is intensified by her focus on the... Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Life is a contact sport. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language and some nudity/sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Oliver Stone conceived the film as an homage to veteran director Robert Aldrich. See more »

Goofs

In the end credits there are thanks to the City of Irvine, Texas rather than Irving, Texas (where Texas Stadium is located.) See more »

Quotes

Dr. Harvey Mandrake: [criticizing the young Dr. Ollie Powers for presuming to examine Jack 'Cap' Rooney] You're actually one of the few relatives that I can stomach, but - You're the internist; I'm the orthopedist, remember? Bone, muscle, joint: me; runny nose, diarrhea, gonorrhea, pink eye: you. Got it?
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Crazy Credits

During the end credits, we see D'Amato accepting an award and telling of his future plans with the league. See more »

Alternate Versions

Alternate television versions of several scenes were filmed. See more »


Soundtracks

Sweet Pain (R&D Division Remix)
Written and Performed by Michael Brook and Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
Courtesy of Real World Records Ltd./Virgin Records Ltd.
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User Reviews

 
A Dizzying, Entertaining Peek Into Pro Football...Stone Style
14 January 2000 | by Don-102See all my reviews

Sports movies are tough to make. Creating the essence of the actual event is the toughest. Most films fall short in the editing process of the event or through sheer carelessness and lack of knowledge. ANY GIVEN SUNDAY is somewhat of an exception. It is hard-hitting and bloody like NORTH DALLAS FORTY. It is actually conventional when you think about it, like a warped RUDY. It is a hell of a lot more realistic than say, NECESSARY ROUGHNESS. These are all football films with varying degrees of success (except ROUGHNESS), but Oliver Stone, in his usual over the top way, throws a dizzying, mind-splitting film at us, much like the sport itself. This is why I liked it.

Oliver Stone began a wicked spell of filmmaking with JFK, evident in its editing style. Fast-paced, black and white mixed with color, documentary-like methods ensued in NATURAL BORN KILLERS, NIXON, and the ghastly U-TURN. Nothing is new here with ANY GIVEN SUNDAY. Football is a battlefield Stone chooses to depict and depict it he does. Even the most ardent fans of the sport do not really know what it is like for a quarterback to drop back and get rid of a piece of pigskin before 11 players maul him. You certainly get the idea watching this.

Al Pacino is the dried up head coach of the fictional Miami Sharks and he barks out the usual coaching cliches you hear in press conferences after real games. Pacino also seems to be sleep-walking through the picture. At times, he appears drunk even when he is not supposed to be. Cameron Diaz's character, a young chick owner, (yeah right) destroys any credibility the film may have had going in (Even the NFL would have nothing to do with this movie). Her constant bickering is so over-done, you almost feel like hurling much the way Jamie Foxx does every time he enters a game as the team's 3rd string quarterback. Realisticly speaking, this is not a very sane film about football. It is a maniacal celebration of the game. The scenes on the field are the ones I cherished. Beware of the locker room or domestic sequences.

No one has ever put such energy into football scenes in a film before. He definitely had some good consultants. There are some comical cameos - Johnny Unitas and Dick Butkus play opposing coaches. Lawrence Taylor can actually act a teeny bit and Jim Brown shares the film's best off the field scene with Pacino in a bar. Stone tries to show us how the game has changed. He resonates past glory with quotes from Lombardi, dissolves showing Red "the Galloping Ghost" Grange, and even Unitas handing off to Ameche. TV has changed everything, says the coach, and he is right. It seems to be all about the money nowadays.

That is the message, but you'll find yourself losing that idea in the lunacy of ANY GIVEN SUNDAY and the bone-crushing, ear-damaging football scenes. They are filmed and cut with such raw intensity, you feel like playing afterwards. This is definitely a film for football fans only unless you like big, sweaty men. Is there a big game at the end that needs to be won? Yes, and this surprised me considering how unconventional Stone usually is. Basically, surrender your senses and thought process to Stone's most entertaining film in quite some time.

RATING: ***


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 December 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Gridiron See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$55,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$13,584,625, 26 December 1999

Gross USA:

$75,530,832

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$100,230,832
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color | Black and White (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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