7.3/10
49,140
319 user 168 critic

Thirteen Days (2000)

In October 1962, the Kennedy administration struggles to contain the Cuban Missile Crisis.

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Writers:

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3 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... U-2 Pilot
... Kenny O'Donnell
Drake Cook ... Mark O'Donnell
... Helen O'Donnell
... Kathy O'Donnell
... Kenny O'Donnell, Jr.
Matthew Dunn ... Kevin O'Donnell
Kevin O'Donnell ... NPIC Photo Interpreter
Janet Coleman ... Evelyn Lincoln
... Floyd
... Jacqueline Kennedy
... John F. Kennedy
... McGeorge Bundy
... Arthur Lundahl
Liz Sinclair ... Kenny's Assistant #1
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Storyline

In October, 1962, U-2 surveillance photos reveal that the Soviet Union is in the process of placing nuclear weapons in Cuba. These weapons have the capability of wiping out most of the Eastern and Southern United States in minutes if they become operational. President John F. Kennedy and his advisors must come up with a plan of action against the Soviets. Kennedy is determined to show that he is strong enough to stand up to the threat, and the Pentagon advises U.S. military strikes against Cuba--which could lead the way to another U.S. invasion of the island. However, Kennedy is reluctant to follow through, because a U.S. invasion could cause the Soviets to retaliate in Europe. A nuclear showdown appears to be almost inevitable. Can it be prevented? Written by <jgp3553@excite.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

You'll Never Believe How Close We Came


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for brief strong language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

12 January 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

13 Days  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$80,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$46,668, 25 December 2000, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$34,592,089

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$66,579,890
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

After John F. Kennedy leaks the Walter Lippmann column to the press, and the representative from the Soviet Union is on the television expressing his concern, Kennedy (Bruce Greenwood) struggles with his tie and clearly mouths an expletive that gets overdubbed as a sound of frustration to maintain the PG-13 rating. In his next line, he mouths that the representative is "fucking killing us," and again his line is overdubbed to remove the curse. See more »

Goofs

In the early scene where O'Donnell is signing his kid's report card, on the right page of the report card it lists ratings of the performance of the student. It lists available ratings for the teachers to choose from : A, B, C, U (instead of "D"). Despite this, under the "Effort" category, the teacher gave a "D". See more »

Quotes

Kenny O'Donnell: [Kenny has come home late at night and found his wife awake in the kitchen] Hi.
Helen O'Donnell: Hi... You look old, O'Donnell.
Kenny O'Donnell: You don't.
Helen O'Donnell: It's 2:30 in the morning - are you flirting with me?
Kenny O'Donnell: We got a back-channel communication from Khruschev this evening, feeling us out about a deal. He confirmed it, just a little while ago in a letter.
Helen O'Donnell: Thank god.
Kenny O'Donnell: Jack kicked us out of his house for the night.
Helen O'Donnell: Darn it. For a second there, I thought you'd been fired.
Kenny O'Donnell: No such luck... I'm driving home, there was something I wanted...
[...]
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Soundtracks

Virga Jesse Floruit
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by John Scott & The St. Paul's Cathedral Choir
Courtesy of Hyperion Records Ltd., London, England
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Almost the end of civilization as we know it.

I watched this movie today with a number of students from my International Politics class, and from the standpoint of a politics professor, this film was absolutely extraordinary. This is a movie about the development of foreign policy in a crisis; it spells out with brilliant detail the decision-making process of JFK's inner circle, the tension between the Executive Office of the President and the Departments of State and Defense, and the attempts by the Military Industrial Complex (namely the Joint Chiefs) to undermine the diplomatic approaches favored by the president. It highlights the conflict between military standard operating procedures ("rules of engagement") and the better judgment/common sense of right-thinking human beings. It hints at conspiracies to (later) depose and otherwise get rid of both Kennedy and Khruschev from within for what turned out to be a very unpopular resolution with the hardliners on both sides. I especially like that the movie acknowledged the humanity of the individual decision-makers without getting too Capra-esquire or preachy.

I can see why this film hasn't been a great commercial success. It is not your standard big studio fare. It's quite cerebral, and although it has some exciting pre-conflict scenes, it's not a "war film". (It reminds me a bit of "Three Kings" in that regard- both films were, in my opinion, mis-marketed. They both seemed to target the younger male action crowd, when both movies are really made for a more intellectual audience.) I liked how the Soviets were not cartoonishly vilified, as is common in a lot of Cold War era films. They were shown to be somewhat calculating and strategic, but not irrational or more importantly, inhuman. In fact, one of the most fascinating parts of the film is the revelation that both sides lack information as to the other side's true intentions. It was this uncertainty that back in October 1962, could have led to the end of civilization as we know it.

The acting was solid (Steven Culp was very, very good as Robert Kennedy- so good, in fact, that I'm afraid he'll have a hard time getting cast in the future. There was audible gasp in the audience when he came on the screen and WAS Bobby). Coaster's accent was actually annoying (as an earlier reviewer noted), but it's forgivable in light of the moving, somewhat understated performance he turns in. It is the directing that takes the cake, however. From the moment the chain of events was set in motion, the tension does NOT let up. It actually feels like you are back in 1962 living through the events of those two weeks- honestly, there was nary a moment to relax until the resolution was wrought. I recommend this film especially strongly to high school and college age students who are too young to have any Cold War memory, as well as to those who lived through the era and may have forgotten what it felt like to come this close.


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