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Ten Blocks on the Camino Real (1966)

Not Rated | | Drama | TV Movie 7 October 1966
A collection of ten vignettes by Tennessee Williams offering various viewpoints on life, love and death. The reference to "Camino Real" is allegorical, and represents the journey of life.

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(play), (screenplay)
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Cast

Credited cast:
... Baron de Charlus
... Officer
... Mr. Gutman
... Jacques Casanova
Kazimir Kokich ... Don Quixote
... The Gypsy
... Esmerelda
Patricia Neway ... La Madrecita
Carrie Nye ... Marguerite Gautier
... Kilroy
Jackie Washington ... Guitar Player
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Stanley Berke
Nat Horne
... Guitar Player
Kenneth LeRoy ... (as Ken LeRoy)
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Storyline

A collection of ten vignettes by Tennessee Williams offering various viewpoints on life, love and death. The reference to "Camino Real" is allegorical, and represents the journey of life.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Details

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Release Date:

7 October 1966 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Camino Real  »

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This collection of ten vignettes, written by Tennessee Williams in 1953, was later expanded to 16 pieces and presented on the New York stage. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Williams writes for Warner Bros.

Imagine if you will that the young Tennessee Williams, after attending an art house retrospective of early to mid forties Warner Bros. films--particularly those featuring John Garfield and Sydney Greenstreet, with a special emphasis on the Twilight Zoneish "Between Two Worlds"--was inspired to write a a high camp entertainment for intellectuals that was an homage to the mystical aspects of Warners, with a really good (and really gay) cameo for Peter Lorre. That's the premise of this production of "Camino Real," and I think they got it absolutely right. If you don't recognize that Martin Sheen and Albert Dekker are playing their characters in the style of Garfield and Greenstreet, you're missing a significant layer of meaning, just as you're going to miss a lot in "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" if you aren't familiar with Ken Russell and the Hammer Frankenstein films. But it's there if you look for it and it'll make a lot more sense if you do.


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