7.6/10
482,144
1,292 user 312 critic

American Psycho (2000)

Trailer
0:32 | Trailer
A wealthy New York City investment banking executive, Patrick Bateman, hides his alternate psychopathic ego from his co-workers and friends as he delves deeper into his violent, hedonistic fantasies.

Director:

Mary Harron

Writers:

Bret Easton Ellis (novel), Mary Harron (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Popularity
288 ( 36)
8 wins & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Christian Bale ... Patrick Bateman
Justin Theroux ... Timothy Bryce
Josh Lucas ... Craig McDermott
Bill Sage ... David Van Patten
Chloë Sevigny ... Jean
Reese Witherspoon ... Evelyn Williams
Samantha Mathis ... Courtney Rawlinson
Matt Ross ... Luis Carruthers
Jared Leto ... Paul Allen
Willem Dafoe ... Donald Kimball
Cara Seymour ... Christie
Guinevere Turner ... Elizabeth
Stephen Bogaert ... Harold Carnes
Monika Meier Monika Meier ... Daisy
Reg E. Cathey ... Homeless Man
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Storyline

It's the late 1980s. Twenty-seven year old Wall Streeter Patrick Bateman travels among a closed network of the proverbial beautiful people, that closed network in only they able to allow others like themselves in in a feeling of superiority. Patrick has a routinized morning regimen to maintain his appearance of attractiveness and fitness. He, like those in his network, are vain, narcissistic, egomaniacal and competitive, always having to one up everyone else in that presentation of oneself, but he, unlike the others, realizes that, for himself, all of these are masks to hide what is truly underneath, someone/something inhuman in nature. In other words, he is comprised of a shell resembling a human that contains only greed and disgust, greed in wanting what others may have, and disgust for those who do not meet his expectations and for himself in not being the first or the best. That disgust ends up manifesting itself in wanting to rid the world of those people, he not seeing them as ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

No introductions necessary. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong violence, sexuality, drug use and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the shooting of the film, Christian Bale spoke in an American accent off-set at all times. At the wrap party, when he began to speak in his native Welsh accent, many of the crew thought he was speaking that way as an accent for another film. They had thought he was American throughout the entire shoot. See more »

Goofs

In multiple scenes at Bateman's apartment, the crew and camera operators are visible in the reflection of his bedroom TV. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Waiter #1: Our pasta this evening is squid ravioli in a lemon grass broth with goat cheese profiteroles, and I also have an arugula Caesar salad. For entrees this evening, I have swordfish meatloaf with onion marmalade, rare roasted partridge breast in raspberry coulis with a sorrel timbale.
Waiter #2: ...and grilled free-range rabbit with herbed french fries. Our pasta tonight is a squid ravioli in a lemon grass broth, and the fish tonight is a grilled...
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Alternate Versions

In the television edit, there are these changes:
  • Though the hooker scene is kept in, the threesome sex scene part is cut off, and after starting "Sussudio" it cuts to them with the light off. When Christian Bale gets up, his butt is not shown.
  • Christian Bale's butt is also removed from "Morning Routine" scene
  • Curses and some innuendo ("he won't give the maitre'd head") are cut. The line "I want you to clean your vagina" is kept however.
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Connections

Featured in Eli Roth's History of Horror: Slashers Part 1 (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Sussudio
Written by Phil Collins
Performed by Phil Collins
Courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products, Virgin Records America and Hit & Run Music Publishing Inc.
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User Reviews

 
A film that teeters between Miracles and Mania
13 October 2001 | by grendel-37See all my reviews

Having just finished American Psycho, I came to IMDB to get some clarification on the ending. And it seems I'm not the only one left vaguely adrift by the ambiguous ending.

I've browsed some of your comments, not all 400+ to be sure. But some of them. A good sampling I think, and this movie has three distinct cheering sections.

Those who consider it a masterpiece, those who consider it unredeemable, boring trash, and by far the largest segment, those who see it as a flawed masterpiece.

I fall into the latter category. And no, I did not read the book. But as others have stated any movie that requires you to read the book, to "get" the movie, is ultimately a failure as a movie.

So my review is based solely on the merits of the film. And contrary to what some have said, the film does have many merits. I found it brilliantly directed, and a superbly acted examination of excess, and boredom, and evil. An examination, satire, critique of a time, and type of thinking.

Even before seeing the ending, I thought how much bateman lives in people. Found myself thinking, an examination of bateman is an examination of men by the name of Reagan and Bush. How American Psycho is an examination of our times, and our modern theologies.

I found the movie as a whole riveting, loved the restraint shown (and disagree with those calling for more gore, I think Mary should be applauded for her deft hand, the scenes have more power for what is not shown), and was captivated by nearly every scene, by scenes others have called boring, but I found profound.

Bateman putting on his makeup, or simply trying to get a restaurant, and the near apocalyptic importance, such minutiae makes in the lives of empty men. The right card, or the right cloth, or the right table, or the right watch, how these are the signposts of an empty age and an empty soul, and how these things have more value than your fellow man... or woman.

Bateman attains everything the materialistic times tells him he should want, but once he gets it he feels nothing. Emptier than before, less than before. It's only in the extremes of his addictions he begins to feel something, anything. He feeds to fill the emptiness, but the more he feeds the emptier he gets. He eats at his fellowman (woman) but in his bloodlust he eats at himself.

He is the American dream, taken to its cannibalistic extremes.



And never before has makeup, played such a mesmerizing part in a movie. Bateman's(Chris Bale's) face at times when he is under stress, takes on a plastic look, a glossy, sweaty sheen, and for all the world it looks like he's wearing a mask... and the mask, his mask of sanity, is beginning to run.

Simply amazing use of makeup. And incredible performance by the lead actor. I wasn't familiar with him before this, but everyone will be after this.

Upon first hearing about this movie, I had no desire to see it. I've grown up since the age of Hills Have Eyes and trash like The Beyond, watching people suffer no longer seems significant. I guess as we get older we ask more of our art than springer, or the WWF, or slasher flicks. We ask of our art to tell us something true. Something of ourselves, and our world.

I think American Psycho under the deft hand of Mary Harron becomes more than my prejudices, and exceeds my expectations. Rises at times to dizzying heights not unlike art.

Mary's restraint makes this movie. But I fear her restraint nearly sinks it as well. The ending is too ambiguous. Who is Bateman in the end. Is there a Bateman? And what did he do or did not do?

In the end,the movie will nag at you. Did he or didn't he? And in the end, now that I write this I'm thinking maybe the answer doesn't really matter, maybe in the end the answer is the same. In the end a sin of thought, or a sin of action, is still a sin. In the end we are left with a man, and a nation... whose mask is slipping.

I think like the first Psycho, time will prove this one.... worthy. I now add Mary Harron to the small selection of modern directors I will tiptoe through broken glass to see. Directors like Dave Fincher(Seven, Fight Club), Carl Franklin(Devil in a Blue Dress), Johnny To(Expect the Unexpected), Ringo Lam(Full Alert, Victim), M. Night Shyamalan(Sixth Sense, Unbreakable), and Peter Weir(Fearless).

Recommended.


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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

USA | Canada

Language:

English | Spanish | Cantonese

Release Date:

14 April 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

American Psycho See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,961,015, 16 April 2000

Gross USA:

$15,070,285

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$34,266,564
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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