James Bond uncovers a nuclear plot while protecting an oil heiress from her former kidnapper, an international terrorist who can't feel pain.

Director:

Michael Apted

Writers:

Neal Purvis (story), Robert Wade (story) | 3 more credits »
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Popularity
2,071 ( 219)
7 wins & 12 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Pierce Brosnan ... James Bond
Sophie Marceau ... Elektra King
Robert Carlyle ... Renard
Denise Richards ... Dr. Christmas Jones
Robbie Coltrane ... Valentin Zukovsky
Judi Dench ... M
Desmond Llewelyn ... Q
John Cleese ... R
Maria Grazia Cucinotta ... Cigar Girl
Samantha Bond ... Moneypenny
Michael Kitchen ... Tanner
Colin Salmon ... Robinson
Goldie ... Bull
David Calder ... Sir Robert King
Serena Scott Thomas ... Dr. Molly Warmflash
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Storyline

James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) is back. An oil tycoon is murdered in MI6, and Bond is sent to protect his daughter. Renard (Robert Carlyle), who has a bullet lodged in his brain from a previous Agent, is secretly planning the destruction of a pipeline. Bond gains a hand from research scientist Dr. Christmas Jones (Denise Richards), who witnesses the action which happens when Bond meets up with Renard, but Bond becomes suspicious about Elektra King (Sophie Marceau), especially when Bond's boss, M (Dame Judi Dench) goes missing. Bond must work quickly to prevent Renard from destroying Europe. Written by simon

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Some men want to rule the world... Some women ask for the world... Some believe the world is theirs for the taking... But for one man, The World Is Not Enough!!! See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of action violence, some sexuality and innuendo | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

MI6 chief medical officer Dr. Molly Warmflash's (Serena Scott Thomas') only appearance in the 007 film franchise. See more »

Goofs

When Renard holds the scalding rock, it burns his skin to the point where smoke comes out. After he lets go of the rock, there is not a mark on his hand. Despite the fact that he cannot "feel pain" his hand would still be visibly burned very badly. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Lachaise: So good of you to come see me, Mr. Bond, particularly on such short notice.
James Bond: If you can't trust a Swiss banker, what's the world come to?
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Crazy Credits

The opening credits don't begin until approximately 15 minutes into the movie -- the longest delay in the series to date. See more »

Alternate Versions

End credits of the video/DVD release include a dedication to actor Desmond Llewelyn, who died soon after the film's original release. See more »

Connections

Featured in Tribute to Desmond Llewelyn (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

The World is not Enough
Music by David Arnold
Lyrics by Don Black
Performed by Garbage
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User Reviews

Third time lucky
24 December 2002 | by Bel LudovicSee all my reviews

The first time I saw this in the cinema in '99, I remember actively disliking it - the first time I'd had that reaction to a new Bond release. I saw it a second time at the cinema, and disliked it less - but still wasn't keen. Now, in the dying days of 2002, and quaking with hatred for - and disappointment at - 'Die Another Day', I re-evaluated TWINE for a second time. And I have to say, compared to this year's farce, TWINE is bathed in a golden glow. In terms of character development, plausibility (always tenuous in Bond films, but still), acting, and script, TWINE is far and away and without a shadow of doubt superior to 'Die Another Day'. Above all, this is a Bond film that does occasionally treat its audience like they have brain cells, rather than a ghastly exercise in sci-fi pretensions with MTV production values.

The opening sequence reveals itself to be one of the very best in the series, taut and exciting, flawlessly directed and perfectly executed. There's nothing else in the film that can quite top it, but some inspired casting helps immeasurably. Sophie Marceau is superb, and it's great to see Robbie Coltrane reprise Valentin Zukovsky, who bags many of the best lines. Judy Dench as 'M' is given a high profile in this entry, which is all to the good as she's clearly the best thing to happen to the Bond films in the Brosnan era. Alas, Desmond Llwelyn makes his final appearance as 'Q' - it would be thus even had he not died the following year - and his exit is well-handled.touching, even. On the downside, Robert Carlyle is not quite convincing as Renard, but it barely matters as Marceau is so firmly in control. Denise Richards isn't as bad as she's been made out to be - indeed, she actually seems smarter and less bland than Halle Berry in DAD.

Plot and action sequences throughout the film are deftly handled, but there are some areas where TWINE seems a little derivative, cheerfully looting the Bond back catalogue, for example in the Caucasus skiing sequence which fuses together action setpieces from YOLT and OHMSS. There are also moments of alarming silliness more redolent of the 1970s and '80s, such as the scene with John Cleese making his debut as future-'Q' and all scenes with Goldie in as Bullion. And for those of us who aren't fans of Pierce Brosnan, there's plenty to annoy - excessive jaw-clenching, lots of posing, inherent charmlessness. I'm sure he's lovely in real life, mind.

Generally, though this is a competent entry in the series, and its attempts at depth just about succeed. It is also the most `how'-and-`why'-proof Bond film since the 1960s, a refreshing change from those Bond films that arrogantly command the audience to suspend their beliefs and do all the maths themselves. Quite why it all went wrong three years later is anyone's guess, but I blame 'XXX' and a continuing adoration of 'The Matrix'.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English | Russian | Spanish

Release Date:

19 November 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Bond 19 See more »

Filming Locations:

Kazakhstan See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$135,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$35,519,007, 21 November 1999

Gross USA:

$126,943,684

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$361,832,400
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Press screenings)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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