A research chemist comes under personal and professional attack when he decides to appear in a 60 Minutes exposé on Big Tobacco.

Director:

Michael Mann

Writers:

Marie Brenner (article), Eric Roth | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
3,761 ( 188)
Nominated for 7 Oscars. Another 23 wins & 51 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Al Pacino ... Lowell Bergman
Russell Crowe ... Jeffrey Wigand
Christopher Plummer ... Mike Wallace
Diane Venora ... Liane Wigand
Philip Baker Hall ... Don Hewitt
Lindsay Crouse ... Sharon Tiller
Debi Mazar ... Debbie De Luca
Stephen Tobolowsky ... Eric Kluster
Colm Feore ... Richard Scruggs
Bruce McGill ... Ron Motley
Gina Gershon ... Helen Caperelli
Michael Gambon ... Thomas Sandefur
Rip Torn ... John Scanlon
Lynne Thigpen ... Mrs. Williams
Hallie Eisenberg ... Barbara Wigand
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Storyline

Balls-out 60 Minutes (1968) Producer Lowell Bergman (Al Pacino) sniffs a story when a former research biologist for Brown & Williamson, Jeff Wigand (Russell Crowe), won't talk to him. When the company leans hard on Wigand to honor a confidentiality agreement, he gets his back up. Trusting Bergman, and despite a crumbling marriage, he goes on camera for a Mike Wallace (Christopher Plummer) interview and risks arrest for contempt of court. Westinghouse is negotiating to buy CBS, so CBS attorneys advise CBS News to shelve the interview and avoid a lawsuit. 60 Minutes (1968) and CBS News bosses cave, Wigand is hung out to dry, Bergman is compromised, and the CEOs of Big Tobacco may get away with perjury. Will the truth come out? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Two men driven to tell the truth... whatever the cost. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The real Jeffrey Wigand asked for two concessions from the filmmakers: that they change the names of his daughters, and that there be no smoking anywhere in this movie. With the exception of one cigarette puff in the Middle East opening sequence, both requests were granted (except for the three small instances previously mentioned). See more »

Goofs

In the scene when Wigand is leaving Louisville to testify in Mississippi, the airport shown is not Louisville International Airport; it is John Wayne Airport in Santa Ana, CA. See more »

Quotes

Mike Wallace: Will you tell him that when I conduct an interview, I sit anywhere I damn please!
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Alternate Versions

The TV version is actually longer than the theatrical version and was extended over two nights. The edit was supervised by director Michael Mann. See more »


Soundtracks

Safe from Harm
(Perfecto Mix)
Written by Bill Cobham (as Billy Cobham), Robert Del Naja (as Robert Del Naja),
Grant Marshall (as Grantley Marshall), Shara Nelson and Andrew Vowles (as Andrew Vowles)
Performed by Massive Attack
Courtesy of Circa Records, Ltd./Virgin Records America, Inc.
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User Reviews

 
A Great Movie, Very Underrated, Due To Poor Marketing
22 March 2007 | by shapiromshapSee all my reviews

Russell Crowe at his best as a Kentucky tobacco executive in Eric Roth and Michael Mann's masterpiece, "The Insider," is one of the most underrated American films ever. Not only is it important historically for its political implications - not about tobacco, but about conflicts of commercial interest that control freedom of speech along the airwaves in the U.S.- it is a great story and it is true. Disney had no idea how to market "The Insider" and essentially sold it as tobacco movie and it is so much more. Pacino gives a grand A plus performance as a Long Island Jewish producer and halfway through the movie I forgot he was Al Pacino. Even better Christopher Plummer masterfully captures the full essence of Mike Wallace. Gina Gershon could turn lust from a stone as always. Michael Mann seems to always pull strong performances from his actors, and Eric Roth who brilliantly adapted "Forrest Gump" did the same here with Mann. Though long, "The Insider" is never boring and a movie all Americans should see twice to make sure they fully comprehend regardless of how you feel about the tobacco debate.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Japanese | Arabic | Persian

Release Date:

5 November 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

60 Minutes See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$90,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,712,361, 7 November 1999

Gross USA:

$29,089,912

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$60,289,912
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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