7.7/10
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Training Day (2001)

Trailer
0:31 | Trailer
A rookie cop spends his first day as a Los Angeles narcotics officer with a rogue detective who isn't what he appears to be.

Director:

Antoine Fuqua

Writer:

David Ayer
Reviews
Popularity
728 ( 83)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 17 wins & 23 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Denzel Washington ... Alonzo
Ethan Hawke ... Jake
Scott Glenn ... Roger
Tom Berenger ... Stan Gursky
Harris Yulin ... Doug Rosselli
Raymond J. Barry ... Lou Jacobs
Cliff Curtis ... Smiley
Dr. Dre ... Paul
Snoop Dogg ... Blue
Macy Gray ... Sandman's Wife
Charlotte Ayanna ... Lisa
Eva Mendes ... Sara (as Eva Mendez)
Nick Chinlund ... Tim
Jaime Gomez ... Mark (as Jaime P. Gomez)
Raymond Cruz ... Sniper
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Storyline

In Los Angeles, a city where streets are overrun by drug dealers, those who have sworn to uphold the law are breaking them to clean up the streets. Denzel Washington plays L.A.P.D. detective Alonzo Harris, a veteran narcotics officer whose methods of enforcing the law are questionable, if not corrupt. 'Training Day' follows Harris as he trains rookie Jake Hoyt over a 24-hour period. Ethical dilemmas arise for Hoyt as well as the audience as questions present themselves as to whether or not Harris' methodology for ridding the streets of South Central Los Angeles of drugs is right or wrong. Written by Anna <dimenxia@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The only thing more dangerous than the line being crossed, is the cop who will cross it.

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong brutal violence, pervasive language, drug content and brief nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mark Wahlberg was considered for the role of Jake Hoyt, and he would later act 2 Guns (2013) alongside Denzel Washington. See more »

Goofs

When Jake jumps on a balcony near the end of the movie, there is already a gun on the balcony, yet Jake only drops the gun a few seconds later. See more »

Quotes

Alonzo: [while meeting on the roof of a parking garage] What's happening? You got the picks and shovels?
Mark: You gonna dig a ditch?
Alonzo: Nope. You are. That's a nice suit.
[to Paul]
Alonzo: What's going on, killer?
Paul: I can't call it. Been hearing some shit out here on these streets. You all right?
Alonzo: Yeah. I talked to the three wise men today. Everything's all good.
Paul: Shit, you say we can get away with it, I'm with you on that.
[points to Jake]
Paul: Who the fuck is this?
[...]
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Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits after the title is shown. See more »

Connections

Featured in Precinct Hollywood (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

(Rock) Superstar
Written by B-Real (as Louis Freese) and Deejay Muggs (as Lawrence Muggerud)
Performed by Cypress Hill
Courtesy of Columbia Records
By Arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
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User Reviews

 
Training Day is a prime example of how just one scene can elevate a film to greatness.
27 February 2018 | by TheMovieDioramaSee all my reviews

You all know the scene I'm talking about. Alonzo's monologue against the street that he thought would cooperate with him. That scene. Urgh, genius. A rookie narcotics officer is paired with a more experienced, albeit corrupt, detective for a day of training in the urban streets of Los Angeles. What looks like a semi-professional day on the job turns out to be a nightmare for the rookie. There are a ridiculous amount of positives, but unfortunately there are various negatives that prevents the police drama from being classed as a classic. At its core, this is a character study. A twisted, demented and self-assured detective who may have started out with the right intentions, but gradually becomes corrupted by the streets. The screenplay consistently reaffirms the idea that it is the environment that changes a person. Being adaptable under given scenarios. The depiction of the streets of Los Angeles and the black and white segregation is rather prominent throughout the film's runtime. Yet it feels extremely real. It is the gritty and dark undertone embedded within the narrative that intrigues you and makes you invested in the characters. Speaking of our protagonist(s), Ethan Hawke was sublime as the naive rookie who just wants to help the world, one crime at a time. However, Denzel Washington just owns every scene in what I can only describe as his best performance. His acting was ferocious. Conveying confidence and fear simultaneously. David Ayer's best script (although that's not saying much...) and Antoine Fuqua's best directorial effort. It's just a shame the ending was unsatisfying with too many plot conveniences throughout. What were the chances that the girl they saved at the beginning was the cousin of a Sureño who was going to kill Jake!? Absurdly convenient. Then later we get the craziest overkill of the decade. Bullets galore. Alas, I do find this to be a gripping police drama and Washington's best performance. That's enough for me to highly recommend this.


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Details

Official Sites:

Warner Bros.

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Russian | Spanish | Korean | Greek

Release Date:

5 October 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Training Day See more »

Filming Locations:

Santa Clarita, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$45,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,550,788, 7 October 2001

Gross USA:

$76,631,907

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$104,876,233
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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