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Entrapment (1999)

PG-13 | | Action, Crime, Romance | 30 April 1999 (USA)
Trailer
0:31 | Trailer
An insurance agent is sent by her employer to track down and help capture an art thief.

Director:

Jon Amiel

Writers:

Ronald Bass (story) (as Ron Bass), Michael Hertzberg (story) | 2 more credits »
4 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sean Connery ... Mac
Catherine Zeta-Jones ... Gin
Ving Rhames ... Thibadeaux
Will Patton ... Cruz
Maury Chaykin ... Conrad Greene
Kevin McNally ... Haas
Terry O'Neill ... Quinn
Madhav Sharma Madhav Sharma ... Security Chief
David Yip ... Chief of Police
Tim Potter ... Millennium Man
Eric Meyers ... Waverly Technician
Aaron Swartz Aaron Swartz ... Cruz's Man
William Marsh William Marsh ... Computer Technician
Tony Xu Tony Xu ... Banker
Rolf Saxon ... ICB Director
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Storyline

Following the theft of a highly-secured piece of artwork, an agent convinces her insurance agency employers to allow her to wriggle into the company of an aging but active master thief. Connery's burglar takes her on suspiciously and demands rigorous training before their first job together, stealing a highly-valued mask from a chichi party. Their deepening attraction and distrust could tear apart their partnership, but the promise of a bigger prize (some eight billion odd dollars) by Zeta-Jones keeps the game interesting. Only, who's playing with whom? Written by Lordship <lordship@juno.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The trap is set. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some language, sensuality, violence and drug content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The building used for exterior shots of Mac's safe house (Castle Duart on the Isle of Mull) was the ancestral home of the chief of the Clan MacLean, which is the maiden name of Sir Sean Connery's mother. See more »

Goofs

The tour guide at the Petronas Towers says they are 700 feet in the air when they are on the bridge. Malaysia is on the metric system so he most likely would have given the height in meters. See more »

Quotes

Gin: I give you the world's tallest building.
Mac: And we're going to steal it?
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Alternate Versions

The British Board of Film Classification state that "substitutions" were made before a 12 certificate could be awarded. The edits were to change the line "Sit the fuck down" to "Sit your butt down". The DVD subtitles contain the original line, and the Australian DVD uses the same cut master. The cuts were waived for the 2007 DVD release. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Chuck: Chuck Versus the Three Words (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

I Want to Be Happy
Written by Irving Caesar and Vincent Youmans
Performed by Ted Heath and His Orchestra
Courtesy of The Decca Record Company Limited (London)
Under license from Universal Music Special Markets
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User Reviews

 
A movie with a preposterous plot, exotic locations, absurd action sequences, and so much chemistry between actors
2 October 2014 | by badfeelingangerSee all my reviews

A movie with a preposterous plot, exotic locations, absurd action sequences, and so much chemistry between attractive actors that we don't care. Gets by well enough on style and star chemistry and the basic allure of watching a tightly-planned caper unfold. A certain sunny sloppiness almost redeems Jon Amiel's throwback caper flick.Connery and Zeta-Jones not only look great together, they work well together, too.Connery and Zeta-Jones are such fun to watch together it almost doesn't matter how little sense the movie makes -- and their relationship is far more gleefully perverse, weirdly chivalrous and surprisingly interesting than the trailer makes it look.Cleverly updates the formula with a sprinkling of fun, fin-DE-millennium touches.Entrapment luxuriates in the best Hollywood big bucks can buy: superb sets and cinematography, spectacular locations, expensive stars. During the opening credits the camera glides through a romanticised Manhattan skyline. The steel and chrome gleam, the lights of the skyscrapers are digital jewels and the frame of the screen is dynamically pierced at odd angles by a laser-like red beam. This sequence holds out a tantalising promise for the movie, particularly when the camera rests on a sinuous cat-burglar entering a high, tightly shut window with elegant ease. We expect an exciting, sleek and slick caper movie, something like To Catch a Thief (1954) or at least (let's not be too greedy) Arabesque (1966). It's not the stars' fault that Entrapment is disappointing. Sean Connery gets the Cary Grant treatment here, made the object of his co-star's desire. Catherine Zeta-Jones chases him just as surely and shrewdly as Audrey Hepburn chased Grant in Charade (1963). Given the 40-year age gap between them, her instigation is presumably meant to make their romance less risible, but it's an unnecessary precaution. Close-ups reveal Connery's skin is losing the battle with time, but his appeal was never really based on youth.

Connery's stardom rests on his ability to represent a man completely at ease with his masculinity and his sexuality better than any other star of his generation. There was always something a bit suspect about prettier men like Paul Newman (cf. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, 1958) while tougher guys such as Clint Eastwood seemed too stiff to be turned on by anything but seaminess (Tightrope, 1984). Connery, however, deploys his physical size, gruff and commanding voice, a glance both sure and sly and a stillness that can pounce into graceful movement at any moment to project a sexuality so confident it can afford to be nonchalant and playful. We are easily convinced that what Zeta-Jones wants from him, give or take a couple of billion dollars, is delivery on the promise of a rough good time.

Zeta-Jones more than holds her own here. Connery may be the object of her desire, but Zeta-Jones is meant to be the object of ours. The sight of her leotard-clad figure practising gymnastics in order to avoid the burglar alarm's lasers is more spectacular and pleasurable than the action set pieces. She emerges from Entrapment a full-blown star, flirting with such intelligent sultriness not even a man of Connery's strength can resist. Good alone but even better together, the two have an undoubted chemistry.

Entrapment aspires to be nothing more than a bit of glamorous nonsense, but although it has done all right by the glamour, it has perhaps done too well by the nonsense. Very badly structured, the story begins to feel ripped off half way through, its maze of double-crossings never delivering a narrative payoff. At the unbelievable and tacked-on ending, even a cynic might feel a twinge of discomfort at the lack of even a half-hearted gesture towards a moral rationale for the action. We're meant to root for these thieves just because they look gorgeous, seem meant for each other and are good at their work.

The fact that the combination of sex and capital as spectacle is thought to need no other rationale says a lot about millennial culture, and would make a good subject for another movie. But this is by-numbers genre work which has forgotten a few sums. Entrapment fails as a caper film because it neglects that fundamental ingredient - a credible plot, evidently something even the biggest chequebooks in Hollywood can no longer guarantee.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | UK | Germany

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 April 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Untitled Antoine Fuqua Project See more »

Filming Locations:

Broadgate, London, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$66,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$20,145,595, 2 May 1999

Gross USA:

$87,704,396

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$212,404,396
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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