8.0/10
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595 user 142 critic

The Iron Giant (1999)

Trailer
2:36 | Trailer
A young boy befriends a giant robot from outer space that a paranoid government agent wants to destroy.

Director:

Brad Bird

Writers:

Tim McCanlies (screenplay by), Brad Bird (screen story by) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
3,287 ( 213)
20 wins & 18 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jennifer Aniston ... Annie Hughes (voice)
Harry Connick Jr. ... Dean McCoppin (voice)
Vin Diesel ... The Iron Giant (voice)
James Gammon ... Foreman Marv Loach / Floyd Turbeaux (voice)
Cloris Leachman ... Mrs. Tensedge (voice)
Christopher McDonald ... Kent Mansley (voice)
John Mahoney ... General Rogard (voice)
Eli Marienthal ... Hogarth Hughes (voice)
M. Emmet Walsh ... Earl Stutz (voice)
Jack Angel Jack Angel ... Additional Voices (voice)
Bob Bergen ... Additional Voices (as Robert Bergen)
Mary Kay Bergman ... Additional Voices (voice)
Michael Bird Michael Bird ... Additional Voices (voice)
Devon Cole Borisoff Devon Cole Borisoff ... Additional Voices (voice) (as Devon Borisoff)
Rodger Bumpass ... Additional Voices (voice)
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Storyline

This is the story of a nine-year-old boy named Hogarth Hughes who makes friends with an innocent alien giant robot that came from outer space. Meanwhile, a paranoid U.S. Government agent named Kent Mansley arrives in town, determined to destroy the giant at all costs. It's up to Hogarth to protect him by keeping him at Dean McCoppin's place in the junkyard. Written by Anthony Pereyra <hypersonic91@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

It came from outer space! See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for fantasy action violence, language, some thematic material and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

On the wall in Hogarth's bedroom is a poster for the film Forbidden Planet (1956). See more »

Goofs

When Hogarth is talking to the Giant in the clearing shortly after bumping into the branch, it shows the Giant's head without the dent, shows Hogarth, then shows the Giant's head again this time with the dent. See more »

Quotes

Kent Mansley: Launch the missile now!
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Crazy Credits

The Warner Brothers logo is done in 50's art deco, as the Sputnik signal is heard. See more »

Alternate Versions

Two added scenes overseen by Brad Bird were animated for the theatrical release of The Iron Giant: Signature Edition. See more »


Soundtracks

Searchin'
Written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
Performed by The Coasters
Courtesy of Atco Records
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products
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User Reviews

 
What more animated movie should be: a thoughtful, funny, touching story.
11 December 2004 | by Anansi00See all my reviews

After seeing this movie, I was overcome by a strange feeling. I realized that I had found a treasure where I had least expected it. The Iron Giant is intelligent, funny, touching, and visually superb, and should show the world that an animated movie does not need to be A) computer-animated, or B) based on a fairy tale to be successful. One of the best American-made children's movies I have seen in a decade: 8.5/10.0

Now, I'm a 17-year-old who is slowly transitioning into the domain of movie buffdom, which basically means that I am watching a stream of movies based on recommendations from friends, critics, and the IMDb Top 250 list. I got this one almost by accident after the local rental place could not find the movie I was really after, choosing it basically on the knowledge that it was the previous project of Brad Bird, director of The Incredibles (a personal favorite). After watching it, I felt like calling up every mother I knew and telling her to have her children (and herself) watch this.

The Iron Giant revolves around an adventurous young boy in 1950s small-town America who discovers a gigantic robot out in the woods that has arrived on Earth from goodness-knows-where. He befriends the robot, while trying to keep him safe from a nosy government agent. The story seldom lags, with a series of comical adventures connected by the boy's growing relationship with his friend.

This movie is very appealing as entertainment. The voices are well-done, and the scenery is also terrific. Most importantly, though, is the animation, which is a bright spot from this time period. The characters are well-drawn, especially the Giant, who through terrific design, lifelike movements, and clever small touches (i.e., the eyes) seems both alien and human, imposing and childlike. Furthermore, the animation is comical. I don't know when I have ever seen slapstick or punchlines so well-complimented by the animation. The script, written by Bird and based off the book The Iron Man, is also very well done. Though the movie relies upon a few minor crutches common to children's movies, it is still very original and clever.

One thing that I must point out about this movie is its morals. Throughout the movie, the main moral of the story, about the Iron Giant learning and choosing to be good, is actually fairly adroitly handled. At no point when the subject comes up, including standard sentimental climax, does the idea seem contrived. Throughout the movie, evidence of Bird's influence by comic books is quite evident, and his ultimate message about heroes (variations of which will resurface in The Incredibles) is relevant and sincere. However, I do have to say that the secondary moral, about the evils of xenophobia and paranoia, both of which are embodied by the movie's antagonist, the government agent and the military, are very politically charged. While this may sound initially controversial and politically charged for a kids' movie (the second of which I do not deny), I noticed that it was in large part a thoughtful spoof of Cold War America, with jokes as well as valuable lessons about "duck and cover" and 1950s nuclear edginess that I found very clever.

On a final note, I do have to point out that this movie had me laughing hard, but more importantly, it brought me closer to tears than any animated movie I can remember (including Bambi), closer than I like to admit. I wish that I had discovered it sooner, and I hope that everyone gets the chance to experience it the way I did.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

6 August 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Iron Giant See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$70,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,732,614, 8 August 1999

Gross USA:

$23,159,305

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$23,180,087
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Signature Edition)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS (Digital DTS Sound)| SDDS | DTS | Dolby

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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