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2 user 9 critic
This Canadian comedy, filmed in black and white and color and adapted from Lepage's play The Seven Branches of the River Ota. In October 1970, Montreal actress Sophie (Anne-Marie Cadieux) ... See full summary »

Director:

Robert Lepage
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2 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anne-Marie Cadieux ... Sophie Maltais
Marie Gignac Marie Gignac ... Patricia Hébert
Richard Fréchette Richard Fréchette ... Walter
Alexis Martin ... Michel
Eric Bernier ... François-Xavier
Marie Brassard ... Hanako
Patrice Godin ... René
Jean Charest Jean Charest ... Claude
Jules Philip Jules Philip ... Policier #1
Tony Conte ... Policier #2 (as Tony Conté)
Normand Bissonnette Normand Bissonnette ... Buchanen
Ghislaine Vincent Ghislaine Vincent ... Madame Petypon
Jean Leloup ... Livreur
Walter T. Cassidy Walter T. Cassidy ... Acteur Nô
Ron Korb ... Nô Musicien: Flute
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Storyline

This Canadian comedy, filmed in black and white and color and adapted from Lepage's play The Seven Branches of the River Ota. In October 1970, Montreal actress Sophie (Anne-Marie Cadieux) appears in a Feydeau farce at the Osaka World's Fair. Back in Montreal, her boyfriend Michel (Alexis Martin) watches the October Crisis on TV and sees Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau declare the War Measures Act. The Canadian Army patrols Montreal streets. Sophie learns she's pregnant and phones Michel. However, Michel is immersed in politics, while Sophie rejects the amorous advances of her co-star (Eric Bernier), becomes friendly with a blind translator, and passes an evening with frivolous Canadian embassy official Walter (Richard Frechette) and his wife Patricia (Marie Gignac). Meanwhile, in Montreal, Michael plots terrorist activities.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Goofs

Near end of movie, on eve of 1980 referendum in Quebec, in Sophie and Michel's refrigerator, we see a berry jam container of a brand not yet found in stores at that time (Vachon-Culinar's Double-Fruit). Same for spreadable Kraft's Philadelphia cream cheese in a round plastic container, which did not appear until later in the decade. See more »


Soundtracks

Tout écartillé
Written by Marcel Sabourin and Robert Charlebois
Performed by Robert Charlebois
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User Reviews

No, No, Yes!
12 April 1999 | by yeadurSee all my reviews

Prolific man of the theatre and occasional film-maker Lepage brilliantly finds a farce among the separatists in Montreal in 1970 to match the Feydeau varierty being performed at Expo 70 in Tokyo. The link is the actress Sophie in Japan, whose boy-friend Michel in Montreal wants to write a more elegant note to go with the bomb his terrorist colleagues plan to set off in three hours' time. His confusion over Japanese and Canadian time has hilarious consequences, as does Sophie's involvement with a lecherous diplomat and his snooty wife. 'No' refers to the Quebequois vote against separation in 1980 & to a No play in Tokyo. My "Yes' is acclaim for a delicious film. Catch it if you can.


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Details

Country:

Canada

Language:

French | Japanese | English

Release Date:

25 September 1998 (Canada) See more »

Filming Locations:

Québec City, Québec, Canada

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Box Office

Budget:

CAD1,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,868, 25 April 1999

Gross USA:

$4,868

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,868
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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