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Milos Forman Appreciation: A Civilized Filmmaker Who Loved Rebels

Milos Forman Appreciation: A Civilized Filmmaker Who Loved Rebels
Milos Forman, who died last week at 86, directed only 12 dramatic features, a startlingly compact résumé when you consider that his career spanned 60 years and more than a few filmmaking epochs, from the Czech New Wave of the ’60s to the New Hollywood ’70s to the post-indie ’90s. Yet almost every one of those movies looms large. That’s because Forman — auteur, actor, professor, expatriate, bon vivant — chose each new project with majestic commitment and care. His two most famous films, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) and “Amadeus” (1984), both dominated the Academy Awards, lending Forman a cachet that helped to sustain his career. Yet even after the triumph of “Amadeus,” he didn’t direct another movie for five years. His films, at a glance, are strikingly eclectic, but what unites them is an overwhelming sly proclivity: Forman, coming out of Czechoslovakia just as it was being crushed by Soviet Communism,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]
Milos Forman, who passed away on April 13, has been voted your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1980s for his masterwork “Amadeus.” The biopic chronicled the infamous rivalry between Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce). Much like the film itself being your preferred Best Picture winner of the ’80s, Forman was your choice for the top Best Director winner of the decade in Gold Derby’s recent poll.

Forman won with 22% of the vote, with Oliver Stone (“Platoon”) coming in second place with a respectable 16%. It was a tie for third between James L. Brooks (“Terms of Endearment”) and Robert Redford (“Ordinary People”) at 11% apiece. Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) rounded out the top five with 9% of the vote. Next up, Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) came in sixth with 8%, Richard Attenborough (“Gandhi”) came in seventh with 7% and Bernardo Bertolucci (“The Last Emperor”) came in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Courtney Love on Milos Forman: 'We Have Lost a Cinema Giant'

Courtney Love on Milos Forman: 'We Have Lost a Cinema Giant'
Courtney Love, who starred in Milos Forman's The People Vs. Larry Flynt and Man on the Moon, paid tribute to the Oscar-winning director following Forman's death at the age of 86.

"He was always gentle and always brought out my best," Love wrote of filmmaker on Instagram. "I was surrounded by love on both of my films with him, and other than Kurt and Frances, they remain the highest points in my life."

As Love notes, Forman cast her in Larry Flynt during a turbulent time in her life, despite
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jim Carrey, Danny DeVito, and More Pay Tribute to Miloš Forman: ‘What a Force’

Jim Carrey, Danny DeVito, and More Pay Tribute to Miloš Forman: ‘What a Force’
Following the news that Miloš Forman has passed away at 86, tributes are pouring in to the two-time Academy Winner. Danny DeVito, who worked with him on both “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Man on the Moon,” released a statement: “He was a dear friend and I will miss his. My thoughts go out to his family. May he Rest In Peace.”

Jim Carrey, Mia Farrow, Edgar Wright, and many others shared their remembrances on Twitter.

Another great one passes through the doorway. Milos Foreman. What a force. A lovely man. I’m glad we got to play together. It was a monumental experience. ;^) pic.twitter.com/wzgmOibDHs

— Jim Carrey (@JimCarrey) April 14, 2018

Proof that the most brilliant of filmmakers could also be unfailingly kind, generous, humble and loyal. Thank you Milos Forman pic.twitter.com/btUmryxjRr

— Mia Farrow (@MiaFarrow) April 14, 2018

Milos the magnificent! čest k jeho památce (honour
See full article at Indiewire »

Milos Forman Beyond the ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’: His Early Czechoslovak Films Reveal a Master of Black Comedy

Milos Forman Beyond the ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’: His Early Czechoslovak Films Reveal a Master of Black Comedy
Milos Forman only made eight English-language features in five decades, but many of his contributions became synonymous with the legacy of American movies. “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” have a powerful resonance in popular culture, while later efforts “The People vs. Larry Flynt” and “Man on the Moon” showed a resilient filmmaker keen on exploring iconoclastic figures by pushing the boundaries of commercial cinema. However, in the wake of his death, no appreciation of Forman’s talent is complete without an acknowledgement of the masterful black comedies he made in the first stage of his career.

Less prophet of doom than a chronicler of contemporary despair, Forman meshed satire with realism and wielded irony as a cultural weapon. In the early ‘60s, Forman was a leading figure of the Czechoslovak New Wave by transforming the pratfalls of disaffected youth into punchlines. The humor emerged as a
See full article at Indiewire »

Peter Travers: How Milos Forman Injected Warmth and Mischief Into Stellar Films

Peter Travers: How Milos Forman Injected Warmth and Mischief Into Stellar Films
Hearing the news of the death of master filmmaker Milos Forman, images flooded in. Not of his movies; at least not right away. I remembered Milos, at his Connecticut farmhouse eight years ago poking at me with his cigar. Any threat in the motion dissipated instantly by the warm, mischievous glint in his eye.

I was there to talk of his career; of all those Oscars he won for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Amadeus and the success of his early Czech films (Loves of a Blonde,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Milos Forman, Oscar-winning Director, Dead At 86

  • CinemaRetro
Forman directing James Cagney in "Ragtime".

By Lee Pfeiffer

Milos Forman, the Czech immigrant to Hollywood who would be awarded two Oscars, has died at age 86. Forman was a rising star in Czechoslovakia in the 1960s, directing such lighthearted, quirky films as "Black Peter" and "The Fireman's Ball". Forman's films were breaking new ground at a time when the progressive Czech government was pushing the envelope against Soviet control and enjoying new freedoms. All of that came crashing down in 1968 when the short-lived "Prague Spring" was crushed by the Soviet invasion. Forman immigrated to America and found the opportunity to make films for major studios. However, his first effort, the critically acclaimed 1971 generation gap comedy "Taking Off" failed at the boxoffice. In 1975, Forman was given another chance, this time by producer Michael Douglas to direct the film version of Ken Kesey's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest". The film
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Miloš Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86

Miloš Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86
Miloš Forman, who rose to prominence as a key figure in the Czech New Wave before establishing himself as one of Hollywood’s most sought-after directors, has died at 86. A two-time winner of the Academy Award for Best Director, the “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” helmer also won three Golden Globes, the Cannes Film Festival’s Grand Prize of the Jury (for “Taking Off”), the Golden Bear at Berlin (“The People vs. Larry Flynt”), a BAFTA award, and numerous other accolades.

He died last night in Warren, Connecticut following a short illness.

“Miloš was truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist, and champion of artists’ rights,” Directors Guild of America President Thomas Schlamme said in a statement. “His contribution to the craft of directing has been an undeniable source of inspiration for generations of filmmakers. His directorial vision deftly brought together provocative subject matter, stellar performances
See full article at Indiewire »

Milos Forman: Hollywood, Global Industry Pay Tribute To Oscar Winner

Milos Forman: Hollywood, Global Industry Pay Tribute To Oscar Winner
Refresh for latest…: Hollywood and international industry figures and groups are reacting to the news that two-time Oscar winning Czech/American director Milos Forman has died at the age of 86. The helmer of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, Amadeus, Hair, Valmont, The People Vs Larry Flynt, Ragtime, Man On The Moon and many more was “truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist and champion of artists' rights,” said DGA President Thomas Schlamme on behalf of the guild this…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86
Milos Forman, the Czech-born filmmaker who won two Oscars for directing classics such as “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” died on Friday at age 86.

His wife, Martina, broke the news to the Czech news agency Ctk on Saturday, according to Reuters. After fleeing his homeland following a Communist crackdown in the late 1960s, Forman quickly established himself in Hollywood as a filmmaker gifted at telling stories of rebels and the burgeoning counterculture.

He won an Oscar for directing 1975’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” which starred Jack Nicholson as a criminal who ends up in a psychiatric facility after pleading insanity and rebels against an oppressive nurse played by Louise Fletcher.

A decade later, he directed the eight-fold Oscar winner “Amadeus,” which depicted the life of 18th-century composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart through the eyes of his rival Antonio Salieri.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2018 (Photos)

He earned a third nomination for 1996’s “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” a depiction of the porn magazine publisher’s protracted legal fight for First Amendment rights.

Other notable films include 1979’s “Hair,” based on the summer-of-love Broadway musical, 1981’s “Ragtime,” 1989’s “Valmont” and 1999’s “Man on the Moon,” a biopic of comedian Andy Kaufman starring Jim Carrey.

Born in the Czech town of Caslav in 1932, he was raised as an orphan because both of this parents were killed in concentration camps during World War II.

Also Read: Milos Forman Lands DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award

After studying at the Prague Film Academy, he became a leading figure in the Czechoslovak New Wave film movement. Several of his early films, including 1964’s “Black Peter” and the 1967 satire “The Fireman’s Ball,” were banned by Czech authorities.

He moved to the U.S. following his native country’s “Prague Spring” uprising against the Communist regime in 1968; he became a U.S. citizen in the 1970s.

In 2007, he returned to Prague to direct a revival of the comic jazz opera “A Walk Worthwhile” that had first been staged in the 1960s. He also shot a film version, released internationally in 2009.

Read original story Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86 At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

R.I.P. Milos Forman (1932 – 2018)

Oscar-winning filmmaker Milos Forman has passed away aged 86, his agent Dennis Aspland has revealed.

Born in Caslav, Czechoslovakia in 1932, Forman emerged as one of he leading figures of the Czechoslovak New Wave during the late 1950s and early 1960s, where his credits included Loves of a Blonde (1964) and The Fireman’s Ball (1967), both of which were nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards.

Forman made his Hollywood debut with 1971’s Taking Off, which received the Grand Priz at the Cannes Film Festival but was critically panned and failed at the box office.

After struggling to find further work in the U.S., he was eventually hired by producers Michael Douglas and Saul Zaentz to direct their 1975 adaptation of Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. The film was a huge success, earning nine Oscar nominations and winning five – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Miloš Forman dies by Jennie Kermode - 2018-04-14 11:21:07

Miloš Forman Photo: Zff2012

Miloš Forman, director of Amadeus and One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, has died at the age of 86 following a short illness. The highly acclaimed filmmaker, who began his career in Czechoslovakia, was also known for his acting and is academic work, and even had an asteroid named after him.

Raised by relatives after his parents died in concentration camps, Forman began his career with a mixture of documentary work and comedies. He happened to be in Paris when Czechoslovakia became communist, and he went on to become a Us citizen and work at Columbia University in New York. In his time, he oversaw the Cannes and Venice film festivals and received a Crystal Globe for his outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema in Karlovy Vary. His other films included The Fireman's Ball, Valmont, Goya's Ghosts and Man On The Moon, the latter a...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Oscar-winning director Milos Forman dies aged 86

Oscar-winning director Milos Forman dies aged 86
Forman directed Amadeus and One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.

Milos Forman, the Czech-born movie director whose films included One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Amadeus, has died aged 86, according to Reuters.

His wife Martina told Czech news agency Ctk that he died on Friday (13 April) after a short illness. “His departure was calm and he was surrounded the whole time by his family and his closest friends,” she said.

Forman won the best director Oscar in 1976 for classic One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, which won the top five categories on the night.

He would
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Milos Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86

Milos Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86
Czech-born director Milos Forman, who won best directing Oscars for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” has died. He was 86.

Forman died Friday in the U.S. after a brief illness, his wife, Martina, told the Czech news agency Ctk. She said that “his departure was calm, and he was surrounded the whole time by his family and his closest friends.”

Having made just one American film at the time, the ironic comedy “Taking Off” (1971), which won critical acclaim but failed to connect with audiences, Forman seemed an unlikely choice to direct the adaptation of Ken Kesey’s countercultural novel “Cuckoo’s Nest.”
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dark Crimes Trailer Pulls Jim Carrey Into a Deadly Underworld

Dark Crimes Trailer Pulls Jim Carrey Into a Deadly Underworld
The first trailer for Dark Crimes is here. While you may not have heard of Dark Crimes, or the insane true story that inspired the movie, you've almost certainly heard of Jim Carrey, who stars as the protagonist. Carrey hasn't been acting as much these days, but he returns in a very serious role as an obsessive cop in what looks to be a very gritty true-crime thriller.

Dark Crimes, originally titled True Crimes, is based on David Grann's 2008 New Yorker article titled True Crimes: A postmodern murder mystery. Director Alexandros Avranas (Love Me Not) brings the real-life tale to the screen, with Jim Carrey on board as a detective who becomes obsessed with a murder case. Given Carrey's level of commitment to certain roles he takes on, one has to imagine after watching this trailer that he might have put himself, and those around him, through the ringer while filming this,
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Dark Crimes’ Trailer: Jim Carrey Is A Polish Detective On The Trail Of A Killer In This Incredibly Bleak Thriller

Jim Carrey became a global superstar based on his incredible comedy filmography of the last two-plus decades. From time to time, the actor would venture off the beaten path and put out a rare drama, like “Man on the Moon,” or even an odd psychological thriller, such as “The Number 23.” And in recent months, the actor has been hitting the news based on his (unflattering) portraits of prominent political figures.
See full article at The Playlist »

The 20 Best Netflix Original Movies, From ‘Beasts of No Nation’ to ‘Strong Island’

  • Indiewire
It’s hard to remember now, but it was only a few short years ago that Netflix was just a shiny new cog in the film industry, and not one of its most powerful engines. But a lot can change in a little while, especially when you’ve got a disruptive new distribution platform, a seemingly infinite supply of money, and an aggressive desire to change Hollywood forever. Starting with 2015’s “Beasts of No Nation,” Netflix began transforming the movie business in much the same way as it had already transformed the television business, financing and distributing — and later also acquiring — its own features.

The move immediately made an impression, with documentary “Winter on Fire” landing the company’s first Oscar nomination. In 2016, Netflix began swooping up some of the most exciting independent films around. In 2017, the company leveraged “Mudbound” to major awards consideration, and made a splash at the
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie News: Ryan Reynolds to Star in 'Detective Pikachu'; 'Logan' Director to Helm Patty Hearst Drama, Maybe with Elle Fanning

Detective Pikachu: Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool, above) will star in Detective Pikachu. The live-action adventure, based on the incredibly popular Pokemon video game series, will feature the titular detective as he solves a mystery. Reynolds' role is said to be "motion-capture in nature." Justice Smith and Kathryn Newton will also star; Rob Letterman (Goosebumps) will direct. [THR]   Patty Hearst: James Mangold (Logan, above) will direct a drama about Patty Hearst. Elle Fanning (The Beguiled) is in talks to star as the college student and newspaper heiress who was kidnapped by the terrorist group known as the Symbionese Liberation Army in 1974 and then became an unlikely member. The team of Larry Karaszewski and Scott Alexander (Man on the Moon) wrote the...

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See full article at Movies.com »

Cinemaholics #42: The Disaster Artist Review

Oh, hi Cinemaholics listeners. It’s time to review The Disaster Artist, directed by and starring James Franco as Tommy Wiseau. Based on the book of the same name by Greg Sestero, this new movie is a dramatic comedy about the making of The Room, considered by many to be the “best worst” film ever made.

As always, the Cinemaholics also cover a host of Mini Reviews, starting with My Friend Dahmer, based on the graphic novel of the same name about notorious serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer from the perspective of someone who knew him in high school. Elsewhere, Jon talks about the first two episodes of Runaways, a new Marvel original show on Hulu which definitely has some potential, as it centers around a group of high schoolers who find out their parents are super villains and inherit their powers.

Maveryke and Will, meanwhile, have a lot to say
See full article at We Got This Covered »
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