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Notting Hill (1999)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama, Romance | 28 May 1999 (USA)
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2:45 | Trailer
The life of a simple bookshop owner changes when he meets the most famous film star in the world.

Director:

Roger Michell

Writer:

Richard Curtis
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Popularity
1,017 ( 109)
Nominated for 3 Golden Globes. Another 11 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Julia Roberts ... Anna Scott
Hugh Grant ... William Thacker
Richard McCabe ... Tony
Rhys Ifans ... Spike
James Dreyfus ... Martin
Dylan Moran ... Rufus the Thief
Roger Frost ... Annoying Customer
Henry Goodman ... Ritz Concierge
Julian Rhind-Tutt ... 'Time Out' Journalist
Lorelei King ... Anna's Publicist
John Shrapnel ... PR Chief
Clarke Peters ... 'Helix' Lead Actor
Arturo Venegas Arturo Venegas ... Foreign Actor
Yolanda Vazquez Yolanda Vazquez ... Interpreter
Mischa Barton ... 12-year-old Actress
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Storyline

Every man's dream comes true for William Thacker, an unsuccessful Notting Hill bookstore owner, when Anna Scott, the world's most beautiful woman and best-liked actress, enters his shop. A little later, he still can't believe it himself, William runs into her again - this time spilling orange juice over her. Anna accepts his offer to change in his nearby apartment, and thanks him with a kiss, which seems to surprise her even more than him. Eventually, Anna and William get to know each other better over the months, but being together with the world's most wanted woman is not easy - neither around your closest friends, nor in front of the all-devouring press. Written by Julian Reischl <julianreischl@mac.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Can the most famous film star in the world fall for just an ordinary guy?

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual content and brief strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

28 May 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Notting Hill See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$42,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$21,811,180, 30 May 1999

Gross USA:

$116,089,678

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$363,944,522
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Hugh Grant was critical about kissing Julia Roberts because of her large mouth. He said she had "such a large mouth" and "was aware of a faint echo as I was kissing her." Roberts has since forgiven Grant for the comments, and has said she is willing to work with him again. See more »

Goofs

At Honey's party, the lamp behind Benny's head when he is talking to Anna about what she does for a living is not in the same place after camera shots from him to her. See more »

Quotes

Keziah: No thanks, I'm a fruitarian.
Max: I didn't realize that.
William: And, ahm: what exactly is a fruitarian?
Keziah: We believe that fruits and vegetables have feelings, so we think cooking is cruel. We only eat things that have already fallen off a tree or bush - that are, in fact, dead already.
William: Oh, all right. Interesting stuff. So, these carrots...
Keziah: Have been murdered, yes.
William: Murdered? Poor carrots. How beastly!
See more »

Crazy Credits

The coloured dots and symbols pop up in time with the music (And when the word 'heart' is sung, a litte red heart appears) See more »

Alternate Versions

In his commentary on the DVD, director Roger Michell indicates that the song "She" is sung in "some territories" by Charles Aznavour, but it was thought that a French vocalist singing "in an English film about an American star" might be too confusing so they brought in Elvis Costello to do a cover version. The version shown in Thailand (and some other countries), and on the DVD issued there has Aznavour singing the song under the head credits. Elvis Costello's cover is used in the last sequence of the film, just like in the American and British releases. In addition, the Thai version finishes with "FROM THE HEART" (Performed By Another Level Written by Diane Warren) instead of "NO MATTER WHAT" by Boyzone. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Nashville: Time Changes Things (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

HOW CAN YOU MEND A BROKEN HEART
Written by Barry Gibb and Robin Gibb
Performed by Al Green
Courtesy of Gibb Brothers Music, administered by BMG Music Publishing Ltd
Courtesy of Cream/Hi Records Inc.
Licensed from Crimson Productions Ltd.
See more »

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User Reviews

Subtle, embedded messages emerge to create positive view of people with disabilities.
18 July 1999 | by LinOnnLineSee all my reviews

Notting Hill, this totally implausible, happily improbable, feel good flick, does more to influence positive attitudes about people with disabilities than any all day sensitivity training seminar could ever hope to accomplish.

As significant as the two leading characters is the ever-present, fanciful circle of friends. Wouldn't we all love to have a close group of intimate chums like these! The collection of assorted characters includes Bella, a woman who uses a wheelchair, a sleek Quickie Ultralight at that. I love the easy nonchalance of her introduction to the viewer. She is merely one of many diverse folks in the day-to-day life of William Thacker, the film's protagonist.

In one after-dinner scene, the group sits around a big, friendly, worn farmhouse table, consuming way too much wine and sharing what stinks about their life. Bella reveals that she and her husband discovered they cannot have children. I like that she also dares make a complaint about "sitting in this damn chair". She is being honest; she is not burdening herself with feelings that she should sugar-coat her life for others. Nor does she feel compelled to be upbeat and cheerful no matter the cost to her own integrity.

This character lives a typical, dare I say "normal" life. She is married, throws parties, gets drunk on occasion, and interacts with the able bodied world around her . . . all with unaffected naturalness. I like the message this sends to the viewing public: people with disabilities are a whole lot like people without disabilities.

In a scene when Anna Scott and William Thacker leave the birthday party celebration, the very first words out of Anna's mouth are, "Why is Bella in a wheelchair?" This is precisely, to the letter, as it would be in real life. When folks come in contact with a person with an obvious disability, they understandably want to know what happened.

Bella's husband tenderly lifts her out of her wheelchair to carry her up the staircase to bed. My thermometer was on . .. testing for feelings of excessive sympathy or sorrow in myself or in the audience. There were none. There was only empathy, warmth, and tenderness, much of what one would feel watching any loving couple where the man lifted the woman over a doorstep, for instance, into their first home. Kudos to the director and the actors for not playing the pity card here. Thankfully no soaring violins tugged at our tear ducts.

As the culminating scene of the movie approaches, the group of friends all impulsively jump into a small European car to race off. There was Bella left waving goodbye from her Quickie. No, wait a minute. This was not to be. They wanted Bella with them; she belonged with them on this mission. There were no complicated maneuvers of how will we squeeze her into the car, what will we do with the wheelchair, no exasperation from the characters. They just did it. They made it happen. Before we knew it, Bella was sitting in the front seat; a few others had rearranged their positions and crammed into the back seat, and off they all went charging away full speed ahead.

In a final scene, the friends are attempting to 'crash a private party' so to speak, and having trouble getting past the hotel management. In a boldly triumphant move, Bella comes wheeling authoritatively toward the hotel bureaucrat, confidently announcing in a power voice: "He is with ME. I am so-and-so from such-and-such journal writing an article on how your hotel treats people with disabilities."

Swoosh! All doors opened to the group! Bella saved the day in her quick-witted plot to get past the hotel magistrate. Aside from the glee I felt at her being the savior of the day, I also applaud the embedded message: Disability rights are expected; don't tread on disability civil rights; disability access is what's happenin' in the Nineties.

This film has broad cross-class mass appeal, from the teenybopper to Joe Six Pack to the intellectual, and therefore has the power to impact the sensibilities of millions of viewers. I applaud Notting Hill for its contribution toward influencing positive attitudes toward people with disabilities.


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