Cure (1997) - News Poster

(1997)

News

Film Review: Cure (1997) by Kiyoshi Kurosawa

The film that established Kiyoshi Kurosawa as the master of slow horror is a true masterpiece of J-horror, through a unique approach that combines terror with the serial crime film and an imposing atmosphere with pointy social remarks.

The story revolves around a series of murders occurring in Tokyo. The common elements in the cases are an X carved with blood in the victim’s neck, and the fact that the murderer is found close to the victims, but does not remember a thing. Detective Takabe and psychologist Sakuma are trying to find out what happened, but their research reaches a dead end. Eventually, one man named Mamiya emerges as the common link among the murders.

Instead of resorting to plot twists and reversals, Kurosawa gradually creates a maze that combines terror with confusion, in a tactic that exemplifies the ingenuity of both his direction and writing.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Giveaway – Win Cure on Dual Format

Cure [Kyua], Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s mesmerising and hypnotic psychological thriller, is available on home video for the first time in the UK in a Dual Format edition on April 23rd, and we have three copies to give away thanks to Eureka Video. Read on for details of how to enter…

Released to critical acclaim in both the East and the West, Cure was a breakthrough film for director Kiyoshi Kurosawa, a nerve shredding thriller about the hunt for a serial killer in a bleak and decaying Tokyo.

A series of murders have been committed by ordinary people who claim to have had no control over their horrifying actions. Following the only link – a mysterious stranger who had brief contact with each perpetrator and their victim – detective Kenichi Takabe places his own sanity on the line as he tries to end the wave of inexplicable terror.

Described as one of the greatest
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Eureka Entertainment to release Cure

Eureka Entertainment to release Cure (Kyua), Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s mesmerising and hypnotic psychological thriller, on home video for the first time in the UK on 23 April 2018 as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in a Dual Format edition featuring a Limited Edition O-card (First 2000 copies only).

Released to critical acclaim in both the East and the West, “Cure” was a breakthrough film for director Kiyoshi Kurosawa, a nerve shredding thriller about the hunt for a serial killer in a bleak and decaying Tokyo.

A series of murders have been committed by ordinary people who claim to have had no control over their horrifying actions. Following the only link – a mysterious stranger who had brief contact with each perpetrator and their victim – detective Kenichi Takabe (Kôji Yakusho, “13 Assassins”, “Tokyo Sonata”) places his own sanity on the line as he tries to end the wave of inexplicable terror.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Foreboding’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Foreboding’
For anyone whose experiences with the last few films from Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa have proven frustrating (and his recent run of form suggests the heady horror days of “Cure” and “Pulse” are gone), the English title of his latest project may sound rather appropriate. You’d do well to be wary: “Foreboding” plays like an unwieldy summary of Kurosawa’s gloomy thematic preoccupations and his worst formal tendencies: It’s overlong, lacks focus, has underwater pacing and a dissociative, somnolent acting style that makes it hard to invest in the human characters even before they’ve been partially zombified.

Condensed erratically, and not nearly enough, into a 140-minute film from a five-part TV show, “Foreboding” has already had a Japanese release. It’s based, confusingly, on the play “Before We Vanish,” which was also the title and the source material for Kurosawa’s last film. While the current movie does boast intermittent sequences that are fun
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Before We Vanish’ Trailer: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns With an Alien Invasion Drama — Watch

  • Indiewire
Super Ltd has released the trailer for “Before We Vanish,” Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s alien-invasion drama that premiered at Cannes last year. About three visitors from another planet on a scouting mission, the “Pulse” and “Cure” director’s latest is due in theaters next month courtesy of Neon’s newly launched boutique label. Watch the trailer below.

Read More:‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff

Here’s the synopsis: “In his twentieth film, acclaimed horror director Kiyoshi Kurosawa reinvents the alien movie as a unique and profoundly human tale of love and mystery. Three aliens travel to Earth on a reconnaissance mission in preparation for a mass invasion. Having taken possession of human bodies, the visitors rob the hosts of their essence — good, evil, property, family, belonging — leaving only hollow shells, which are all but unrecognizable to their loved ones. Equally hilarious,
See full article at Indiewire »

Aliens Invade in U.S. Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s ‘Before We Vanish’

When it comes to the U.S. distribution of Kiyoshi Kurosawa films, we often learn about their arrival just before they debut. Following the VOD-only release of Daguerrotype last fall, this is certainly the case for his sci-fi invasion feature Before We Vanish. Following a Cannes premiere and ahead of a February release, a new trailer and poster have now arrived.

Rory O’Connor said in our review, “There are few directors who would choose to take a semi-sincere approach to a lengthy pseudo-philosophical science-fiction film — especially not one that lightly pries into our fundamental psychological foibles — but there are few directors quite like Kiyoshi Kurosawa. The prolific Japanese filmmaker behind such varied genre gems as Pulse and Tokyo Sonata has constructed a sort of skittish and overlong, albeit pleasantly existential oddity in Before We Vanish, an alien-invasion B-movie packed with A-grade ideas and craft. Nail down your windows. Lock your doors.
See full article at The Film Stage »

U.S. Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Ghost Story ‘Daguerrotype’ Starring Tahar Rahim

The U.S. distribution of Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s films are never guaranteed, so when one comes our way, we’ll take it however it arrives. His ghost story Daguerrotype, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival last fall, will get a VOD release next month, on November 7, and now a new trailer has landed.

Starring Tahar Rahim, Constance Rousseau, and Olivier Gourmet, the story follows a daguerreotype photographer’s assistant who falls in love with his employer’s daughter and things get more mysterious therein. See the trailer below, following an excerpt from our review:

Kiyoshi Kurosawa has ways of making it look easy, even unimpressive. To my knowledge, he has never made a film that’s less than a pleasure to simply observe, richly detailed in environment and carefully calibrated in composition, cutting, and gesture — masterclasses too focused on feeling (excitement, mystery, romance, and, most often, terror) to pronounce great pretensions.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff

  • Indiewire
‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff
Watching the dreadful and painfully distended films Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa made over the last 10 years, you’d be forgiven for thinking that he was abducted in 2008 and hijacked by a clueless alien parasite trying to keep up appearances. A major figure during the early days of J-horror, Kurosawa distilled the entropy creeping into the digital age before most other artists even felt it — modern classics like “Cure,” “Pulse,” and even the less-horrifying likes of “Bright Future” continue to serve as invaluable time capsules from the era that we’re still trying to escape.

As recently as “Tokyo Sonata,” which is now almost a decade old, it seemed as though Kurosawa could sublimate his obsessions with societal decay into any genre, and the shattering final scene of that film left fans desperate to see where he would go next.

Then, things got bad. The falloff was subtle at first, and it came in small doses,
See full article at Indiewire »

Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Jumbled Yet Fascinating ‘Before We Vanish’ [Nyff Review]

Kiyoshi Kurosawa, the Japanese filmmaker behind “Cure,” Pulse” and “Tokyo Sonata,” tackles the sci-fi thriller in his latest venture entitled “Before We Vanish.” Adapted from Tomohiro Maekawa‘s play of the same name, which has been revived on the Japanese stage many times, the film has echoes of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” which also had its invaders draining brains and ultimately trying to take our much beloved planet.

Continue reading Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Jumbled Yet Fascinating ‘Before We Vanish’ [Nyff Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

New to Streaming: ‘Manifesto,’ ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,’ ‘Creepy,’ ‘A Woman’s Life,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

After the Storm (Hirokazu Kore-eda)

Can our children pick and choose the personality traits they inherit, or are they doomed to obtain our lesser qualities? These are the hard questions being meditated on in After the Storm, a sobering, transcendent tale of a divorced man’s efforts to nudge back into his son’s life. Beautifully shot by regular cinematographer Yutaka Yamasaki, it marks a welcome and quite brilliant
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title

  • Indiewire
‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title
According to a lecture given early in “Creepy,” serial killers are broken down into three categories: organized, disorganized, and mixed characteristic. The first two are relatively easy to define, and thus simpler to track down. Mixed-characteristic killers, meanwhile, exhibit no discernible patterns. They’re puzzles, anomalies. You can probably guess which class of killer this detective story from Kiyoshi Kurosawa follows.

The director, whose genre mastery is most evident in the likes of “Pulse” and “Cure,” more recently delved into this territory in “Daguerreotype.” That old-fashioned haunt took him outside Japan with the help of Tahar Rahim, Olivier Gourmet, and Mathieu Amalric; “Creepy” is both a return home and a return to form. Here he’s woven a procedural yarn from a novel by Yutaka Maekawa that was either loosely adapted or strikingly aligned with the director’s long-established sensibilities.

Read MoreNew Films By Terence Davies & Kiyoshi Kurosawa Set Berlin Premieres,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Before We Vanish’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Before We Vanish’
Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s “Before We Vanish” may be a sci-fi thriller about an alien attack and brain-drain à la “Invasion of the Body Snatchers,” but its ultimate message is the salvation of love. Playing frequently like an absurdist political satire with only flashes of violence, this low-tension, drawn-out work won’t gratify the chills or adrenaline rushes fanboys crave, but the ending strikes a romantic chord so pure that all but the most jaded cynics will be moved. Distributed in Europe through Wild Bunch,the film will rely heavily on Kurosawa’s reputation and longtime supporters even for moderate success.

The literal Japanese title, “Strolling Invaders,” suggests a threat so casual it’s not immediately noticeable. In light of how press freedom and human rights are being whittled away in many parts of the world, a story about aliens robbing humans of their values (family, work, rules) and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: First Teaser For Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Alien Invasion Movie ‘Before We Vanish’

You can’t throw a rock without hitting a must-see movie at the Cannes Film Festival this year, and there are plenty more beyond the big name titles that are worth putting on the radar. And one that has our attention is Kiyoshi Kurosawa‘s “Before We Vanish.”

Slotted into the ‘Un Certain Regard’ section, the latest from the director of “Cure,” “Creepy,” and “Tokyo Sonata,” seems to be a hybrid of an alien invasion story and relationship drama.

Continue reading Cannes: First Teaser For Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Alien Invasion Movie ‘Before We Vanish’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

17 Shocks and Surprises from the 2017 Cannes Lineup, From ‘Twin Peaks’ to Netflix and Vr

For such a highly anticipated event, the Cannes Film Festival tends to contain a fairly predictable lineup: The Official Selection focuses on established auteurs whose work lands a coveted slot at the flashy gathering on autopilot. That was certainly the case last year, when the 2016 edition opened with a Woody Allen movie and featured new work from the likes of Pedro Almodovar, Nicolas Winding Refn, the Dardennes brothers and Olivier Assayas.

But we live in unpredictable times, and judging by today’s announcement of the Official Selection for Cannes 2017, even the world’s most powerful festival isn’t impervious to change. This year’s Cannes is filled with surprises: television and virtual reality, some intriguing non-fiction selections, and a whole lot of unknown quantities that push the festival in fresh directions.

That’s not to say that there aren’t a few familiar names that stand out. Todd Haynes is
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Jackie,’ ‘Fences,’ ‘I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

10 Cloverfield Lane (Dan Trachtenberg)

Forget the Cloverfield connection. The actors who were in this film didn’t even know what the title was until moments before the first trailer dropped. Producer J.J. Abrams used that branding as part of the wrapping for its promotional mystery box, but the movie stands perfectly alone from 2008’s found-footage monster picture. Hell, 10 Cloverfield Lane perhaps doesn’t even take place within the same
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Bottom Shelf: John Carpenter, Absurd, Intruder, Creepy

Nick Aldwinckle Mar 2, 2017

Vampires, Ghosts Of Mars and the super-tense Creepy lead our latest round-up of horror DVDs and Blu-rays...

Any regular readers (there must be a few of you; there must be) will be more than aware of this writer’s borderline obsessive love for the movies of one John Carpenter. You’ve got your Halloween, The Thing, They Live or The Fog, but everyone knows the real quality comes in the form of the later films in this cult film-maker, lord of the synth and accomplished ‘tache-wearer’s career and the classics that are Escape From L.A and his TV-movie take on Village Of The Damned. No? Ok, those are both more than a little iffy, but with the latest Blu-ray release of two other generally maligned late efforts in Carpenter’s body of work, we ask the age-old question 'Was Vampires really that bad?'

Yes,
See full article at Den of Geek »

New Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s ‘Daguerreotype’ Explores a Photographer’s Obsession

Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa (Cure, Tokyo Sonata, and Creepy) is back with Daguerreotype, and like the title suggests, the story follows the obsession of an aged photographer (Oliver Gourmet) as he uses his own daughter and assistant for rendering life-like images, using old photographic techniques. Recently stopping by the Toronto International Film Festival where it was met with a divisive reaction, a new trailer has now landed, albeit without English subtitles, for the film known in France as Le Secret De La Chambre Noire, which translates to The Secret of the Darkroom.

We said in our review, “Kiyoshi Kurosawa has ways of making it look easy, even unimpressive. To my knowledge, he has never made a film that’s less than a pleasure to simply observe, richly detailed in environment and carefully calibrated in composition, cutting, and gesture — masterclasses too focused on feeling (excitement, mystery, romance, and, most often, terror) to pronounce great pretensions.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Notebook Reviews: Kiyoshi Kurosawa's "Creepy"

  • MUBI
Premiering earlier this year the Berlin International Film Festival, Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Creepy is a detective tale freely adapted from an award-winning novel by Yukata Maekawa. Like his second film shown at film festivals this year, Daguerrotype, it may not be the masterpiece on the level of Cure or Charisma that some of the filmmaker's fans are continually looking for, just like some acolytes of Johnnie To forever want him to make another The Mission. But then again, Kurosawa has always been a B-movie director at his core, with a love for pulp material that he slows down and draws out, mining the schlock and cliché of horror films and thrillers for their deep metaphysical unease. He films a world broken and disturbed at its core, so how can we expect perfection from such a vision?After the ghost romance Journey to the Shore, which debuted last year at Cannes,
See full article at MUBI »

Newswire: Kiyoshi Kurosawa, king of ambiguous dread, won’t say what his next movie’s about

Kiyoshi Kurosawa, the Japanese writer-director behind some of the most unsettling horror movies of recent decades, including Cure and Pulse, has been having a pretty good year. He’s premiered two new films, one of which, Creepy, recently opened in the U.S. and ranks as some of his best work in years. (The other, Daguerrotype, doesn’t yet have an American distributor.) And he’s already finished his next film, a currently untitled project that’s been shrouded in a fair amount of secrecy.

From Screen Daily come the first bits of information we’ve had about the film: it’s an adaptation of a play (though Kurosawa won’t say which one) and is being described as a “sci-fi suspense film” by its studio, Nikkatsu. The movie is currently in post-production, though at this point, even the cast is unknown. Screen Daily quotes the director as saying, “I
See full article at The AV Club »

[Review] Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s ‘Creepy’ Earns its Title

[Review] Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s ‘Creepy’ Earns its Title
It has been 10 years since Kiyoshi Kurosawa unleashed a horror film unto the world (2006’s Retribution), and even longer since his smash hits Cure (1997) and Pulse (2001). He returns to the genre he is known for with Creepy, which has its Texas premiere at the Austin Asian American Film Festival tomorrow night. Creepy is a slow burn thriller that has a […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites