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Ghosts Before Breakfast ()

Vormittagsspuk (original title)
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Hans Richter, noted for his abstract shorts, has everyday objects rebelling against their daily routine.

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Cast

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Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Werner Graeff
Walter Gronostay
Paul Hindemith
Darius Milhaud
Madeleine Milhaud
Jean Oser
Willi Pferdekamp

Directed by

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Hans Richter

Written by

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Werner Graeff ... () (uncredited)
 
Hans Richter ... () (uncredited)

Produced by

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Hans Richter ... producer

Music by

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Paul Hindemith

Cinematography by

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Reimar Kuntze

Film Editing by

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Hans Richter ... (uncredited)

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

This film embraces the ideals of Dadism, as it shows a series of nonsensical images tied together by four floating bowler hats, which often transform into something else, and a clock ticking down the time. Some of the images include a man's bow-tie with a life of its own, a shooting range whose target continually changes from its standard concentric rings to a man's revolving head, a geometric pattern of guns, a group of men seemingly looking for something, a spool of a water hose, opening and closing windows, a group of people effectively hiding behind a narrow pole, a budding branch, the changing views of men's faces and the back of women's heads, human male legs in various movements, men fighting, and rotting smiles. All of this happens before men sit down for breakfast, when the bowlers find their final resting places. Written by Huggo

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Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • Vormittags-Spuk (Germany)
  • Ghosts Before Breakfast (United States)
  • Fantasmata prin to progevma (Greece)
  • Upiór przedpoludniowy (Poland)
  • Предполуденный призрак (Soviet Union, Russian title)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 6 min
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Did You Know?

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Trivia This film was banned by the Nazi Party in Germany for its experimental nature and critique of the regimentation of daily life. The Nazis destroyed several copies of the film in hopes of eradicating it. See more »
Movie Connections Featured in Bewegte Bilder. Deutsche Trickfilme der Zwanziger Jahre (1975). See more »
Crazy Credits In the English version, the opening title card states: "The Nazis destroyed the sound version of this film as 'degenerate art'. It shows that even objects revolt against regimentation." See more »

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