6.7/10
145,708
357 user 135 critic

Analyze This (1999)

R | | Comedy, Crime | 5 March 1999 (USA)
Trailer
0:30 | Trailer
A comedy about a psychiatrist whose number one patient is an insecure mob boss.

Director:

Harold Ramis

Writers:

Kenneth Lonergan (story), Peter Tolan (story) | 3 more credits »
Nominated for 2 Golden Globes. Another 4 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robert De Niro ... Paul Vitti
Billy Crystal ... Dr. Ben Sobel
Lisa Kudrow ... Laura MacNamara Sobel
Chazz Palminteri ... Primo Sidone
Kresh Novakovic ... '50s Gangster (as Kresimir Novakovic)
Bart Tangredi ... Young Vitti Sr.
Michael Straka ... Young Dominic Manetta
Joseph Rigano Joseph Rigano ... Dominic Manetta (as Joe Rigano)
Joe Viterelli ... Jelly
Richard C. Castellano Richard C. Castellano ... Jimmy Boots (as Richard Castellano)
Molly Shannon ... Caroline
Max Casella ... Nicky Shivers
Frank Pietrangolare Frank Pietrangolare ... Tuna
Kyle Sabihy Kyle Sabihy ... Michael Sobel
Bill Macy ... Dr. Isaac Sobel
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Storyline

Living in the shadow of his famous psychiatrist father, with multiple issues to deal with while getting ready to remarry, the New York City psychologist, Dr Ben Sobel, has one more problem to take care of, after a fender bender with the powerful mob boss, Paul Vitti. Secretly suffering from intense anxiety attacks that render him incapable of doing what he is best at, the notorious gangster decides to pay the good doctor a visit, hell-bent on resolving his deep-seated issues before the annual meeting of Big Apple's Mafia Dons. Now, Ben has a pressing two-week deadline to come up with an effective solution, as his conflicted but dangerous patient takes no for an answer. Can Ben analyse this? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

New York's most powerful gangster is about to get in touch with his feelings. YOU try telling him his 50 minutes are up.

Genres:

Comedy | Crime

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, a scene of sexuality and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Max Casella, Aasif Mandvi, Tony Darrow and Elizabeth Bracco all starred in The Sopranos (1999) which was released the same year and was also about a mob boss who suffers from panic attacks and sees a psychiatrist. All of the actors played nearly identical characters on the show, with Casella, Darrow and Bracco as related to or members of the mob and Mandvi as a medical professional/ER Doctor. See more »

Goofs

In the first shot of Primo confronting Paul outside the warehouse, we see a gun tucked in his waistband; in subsequent shots of Primo, the gun is gone. See more »

Quotes

Boss Paul Vitti: I wasn't really gonna whack you.
Dr. Ben Sobel: Paul...
Boss Paul Vitti: Okay, I was gonna whack you. But I was real conflicted about it.
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Connections

Referenced in Die Another Day (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

La donna é mobile
from "Rigoletto"
Written by Giuseppe Verdi
Performed by Alfredo Kraus with R.C.A. Italiana Opera Orchestra and Chorus ( as The RCA Italiana Opera Orchestra), Georg Solti conducting
Courtesy of BMG Classics/RCA Victor
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User Reviews

 
The Don's Analyst.
26 March 2004 | by MovieAddict2016See all my reviews

Robert De Niro has one of the best faces in Hollywood. And by that, I mean that a simple facial contortion can send the audience into a fit of laughter, or send a chill down their spine. In "Taxi Driver," his devilish, wide-toothed smile portrayed a sense of fascination and pleasure -- his character was being bombarded with images that made him feel happy, and almost hysterical, in a strange sort of way. When he stared into that mirror and asked whom we were talkin' to, he smiled because he was sick and liked the idea of having the control, and enjoyed picturing the end result.

In "Analyze This," when he stares at Billy Crystal with his iconic "Who you talkin' to?" glare, it is not out of pleasure, but out of sheer amazement. In short, he is asking everyone in the room (and the audience) if he's the only one who's seeing what's going on, and the complete absurdity of it all. Watching De Niro's face in "Analyze This," and listening to the accompanying comical speeches, is the pure pleasure of the film. He steals the show.

Paul Vitti (De Niro) is having problems. Lately he has been unable to work up enough will power to kill hostages, gain an erection, and has been found crying for forty minutes after watching bittersweet commercials on television. Normally this might be considered normal (for the most part, at least), but the problem is that Vitti is a Mob Boss in New York City, meaning that if he can't muster up enough strength to carry out his duties, word of his weaknesses will travel, and he'll soon find himself sleeping with the fishes.

Ben Sobel (Crystal) is a frustrated, failing psychologist trying to raise a son on his own, and keep a relationship with his girlfriend (Lisa Kudrow) from falling apart. When he smashes into the back of Vitti's car, the Mafia kingpin's right-hand-man, Jelly (the late Joe Viterelli), asks him to help out his employer.

Sobel is of course quite reluctant to begin practice on New York's most infamous Mafia figure, but reluctantly does so after being threatened. ("You know who I am?" "Yes." "No you don't." "No I don't." "Have you read about me in the papers?" "Yes." "No you haven't." "I don't even get the paper.")

Meanwhile, a reunion of all the powerful Mafia figures in New York looms ominously nearer, and Sobel finds himself being targeted by the FBI, as well as professional hit men who find themselves being thrown out of hotel windows by Vitti. "Let me guess, he just jumped?" Sobel asks. Vitti is eager to use this as an explanation for the incident.

"Analyze This" is directed by Harold Ramis, the man who crafted "Groundhog Day" with Bill Murray, and who also played Murray's best friend in Ivan Reitman's "Stripes" (1981), about two idiots who join the Army in search of women and quick cash. Here, in what is literally one of his roughest and filthiest films, Ramis is able to poke fun at all the most iconic stereotypes of Italian-American Mafia figures. There's even a great dream sequence that mimics "The Godfather," in which Sobel wanders towards a fruit stand to buy some oranges, and finds himself assassinated by two hit men, with De Niro doing his best impersonation of cry-baby Fredo. Later, when recounting his story to Vitti in a church, the Mafia kingpin asks him, "I was Fredo? I don't think so."

You will find yourself appreciating much more of "Analyze This" if you are familiar with its content. It may not be labeled as such, but in its essence it is a spoof of the last century's best gangster films, borrowing its plot from "The Don's Analyst" and benefiting from a wonderfully surprising (and humorous) performance by De Niro, who stretched his funny bones with Martin Scorsese's "The King of Comedy" and Neil Jordan's "We're No Angels," but masters the feat of effective facial features here. It does indeed help to know a bit about Mafia movies before you see "Analyze This," but even if you don't, you're still guaranteed to have a fun time.

4/5 stars.

  • John Ulmer


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 March 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Analyze This See more »

Filming Locations:

Bal Harbour, Florida, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$80,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$18,383,507, 7 March 1999

Gross USA:

$106,885,658

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$176,885,658
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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