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Lambchops (1929)

George and Gracie enter an elegant drawing room, looking everywhere for something. Turns out, they're looking for the audience, and when George spots the camera, they start in on their ... See full summary »

Director:

Murray Roth (uncredited)
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1 win. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
George Burns ... George the Boyfriend (as Burns)
Gracie Allen ... Gracie the Girlfriend (as Allen)
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Storyline

George and Gracie enter an elegant drawing room, looking everywhere for something. Turns out, they're looking for the audience, and when George spots the camera, they start in on their patter. Gracie wants to convince George that she's smart, not dizzy - it's an uphill struggle of which she's blissfully unaware. Midway through, they break into song: "Do You Believe Me?" It includes a little bit of hoofing as the chatting continues. They end on a story Gracie whispers into George's ear. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Genres:

Comedy | Short

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Did You Know?

Trivia

In his 1955 autobiography, George Burns said of his first short, "The picture was not the greatest" and "the Warner Brothers were not happy" with it. Subsequently, Paramount commissioned him and Gracie Allen to make four shorts a year, which further irked Warner Brothers. See more »

Quotes

George the Boyfriend: Do you like to love?
Gracie the Girlfriend: No.
George the Boyfriend: Do you like to kiss?
Gracie the Girlfriend: No.
George the Boyfriend: What do you like?
Gracie the Girlfriend: Lambchops.
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Connections

Featured in The Dawn of Sound: How Movies Learned to Talk (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Do You Believe Me?
(uncredited)
Written by Benny Davis
Sung by George Burns and Gracie Allen
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User Reviews

 
A cute little Vitaphone short
1 December 2007 | by robcat2075See all my reviews

A cute little short, Gracie shines, George doesn't quite have the straight man perfected but he'll get there.

I wonder how they did this act in vaudeville with no microphones or amplification.

The most disorienting element is seeing them both so young, 10 years before their radio stardom and 20-30 before their TV show.

Someone should have told George to tilt his fedora away from the camera so we could see his face better.

I'm impressed with the sound. 1929 is still the stone age for movie sound but audio superiority of Vitaphone's sound on disc system really shows here.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

October 1929 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Burns and Allen in Lambchops See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Vitaphone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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