6.3/10
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1 user 1 critic

Kitchen (1989)

The story centers around Mikage, a young woman who loses her parents when young. She grows up in a lonely household with her grandmother who dies when Mikage reaches adulthood. ... See full summary »

Director:

Yoshimitsu Morita

Writers:

Yoshimitsu Morita (screenplay), Banana Yoshimoto (novel)
Reviews
5 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Ayako Kawahara Ayako Kawahara
Kenji Matsuda Kenji Matsuda
Isao Hashizume Isao Hashizume
Mie Hama
Simon Yotsuya Simon Yotsuya
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Storyline

The story centers around Mikage, a young woman who loses her parents when young. She grows up in a lonely household with her grandmother who dies when Mikage reaches adulthood. Grief-stricken, she finds solace in the kitchen. Yuichi, a friend of Mikage's deceased grandmother, invites her to live with him and his mother. Then Mikage discovers that Yuichi's mother is actually his cross-dressing father. On the other hand, Mikage realizes that the wealth of gadgetry in Yuichi's kitchen is lovingly detailed... Written by L.H. Wong <lhw@sfs.org.sg>

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Plot Keywords:

based on novel | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

29 October 1989 (Japan) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Wako International See more »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Connections

Version of Kitchen (1997) See more »

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User Reviews

a visual delight
2 October 1999 | by creadSee all my reviews

Kitchen, a rather obscure-looking Japanese/Hong-Kong film, was a movie I had previously heard little about. However, I was surprised by the beauty of the filming and the quality of the acting. The plot was nothing too original - a boy-meets-girl tale given interest by the fact that they have character and speak a language I don't understand - but the technique was in places stunning - the opening sequence, for instance, a close up of rain beating down on a puddle when slowly a human face emerges - Aggie, as she is called. Not perhaps what many 'foreign' film fans may be looking for, but this undeniably has an exquisite quality that I have not encountered this side of Casablanca. If you are lucky enough to be able to watch this, then do so.


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