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First Look at Will Smith and Tom Holland's Spies in Disguise

First Look at Will Smith and Tom Holland's Spies in Disguise
Fox Animation, Chernin Entertainment and Blue Sky Studios have announced the voice casting for their upcoming animated film Spies In Disguise. The studio has brought on Will Smith and Tom Holland to lead the voice cast as Lance and Walter in this animated comedy, while also releasing the first two photos featuring each of these characters. It's unclear at this time if the studio will be announcing any further voice cast members for this new project in the near future.

Spies In Disguise is a buddy comedy set in the high octane globe-trotting world of international espionage. Will Smith (Men in Black) voices Lance Sterling, the world's most awesome spy. Cool, charming and super-skilled, saving the world is his occupation. And nobody does it better. Almost the exact opposite of Lance is Walter, voiced by Tom Holland (Spider-Man: Homecoming). Walter is a great mind but perhaps not a great socializer.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Netflix Hires DreamWorks Vet Melissa Cobb as Vice President of Kids and Family

Netflix has hired Melissa Cobb as its new vice president of kids and family, the streaming service announced Thursday.

Cobb, who most recently served as chief creative officer and head of studio for Oriental DreamWorks, will be based in the Los Angeles office, reporting to chief content officer Ted Sarandos. In her role, she will lead the content team responsible for bringing kids and family titles to Netflix members, with an expanded focus on high quality series and event programming across the spectrum of kids and family entertainment, including both animation and live action.

“Melissa brings a wealth of experience creating and overseeing series and feature films that resonate with kids and families across the globe,” said Sarandos. “No matter where they live, our members find tremendous enjoyment in our kids and family content, and I couldn’t be happier to have Melissa on board to continue expanding into new and exciting areas.”

In
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The 50 Best Animated Films of the 21st Century Thus Far

There’s something inherently remarkable about the field of animation: that, with just a paper and pen, one can use infinite imagination to create a world unbound by physical restrictions. Of course, in today’s age it goes far beyond those simple tools of creation, but it remains the rare patience-requisite medium in which a director’s vision can be perfected over years until applying that final, necessary touch.

With Pixar’s 17th feature arriving in theaters, we’ve set out to reflect on the millennium thus far in animation and those films that have most excelled. In picking our 50 favorite titles, we looked to all corners of the world, from teams as big as thousands down to a sole animator. The result is a wide-ranging selection, proving that even if some animation styles aren’t as prevalent, the best examples find their way to the top.

To note: we only stuck with feature-length animations of 60 minutes or longer — sorry, World of Tomorrow, and even Pixar’s stunning Piper — and to make room for a few more titles, our definition of “the 21st century” stretched to include 2000. We also stuck with films that don’t feature any live-action (for the most part) and that have been released in the U.S. thus far, so The Red Turtle and Phantom Boy will get their due on a later date. Check out our top 50 below and let us know your favorites in the comments.

50. The Lego Movie (Phil Lord and Christopher Miller)

Admit it: When The Lego Movie was announced, you did not expect it to wind up any best-of-the-year lists. But, against all odds, Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s first smash hit of 2014 is an unadulterated pleasure. This bold, original film has a wildly clever script (by the directors) with a message of creativity that made it a glorious surprise. It is also well-cast: Lego is the first movie to fully make use of Chris Pratt’s essential sweetness, and offered Elizabeth Banks, Will Ferrell, Liam Neeson, and Morgan Freeman their freshest parts in years. It is not often that a “kids” film entertains adults as much as their children, but The Lego Movie is far more than a piece of entertainment for the young ones. What could have been a headache-inducing, cynical creation is instead a pop treat. Everything is, indeed, awesome. – Christopher Schobert

49. 5 Centimetres per Second (Makoto Shinkai)

Makoto Shinkai’s emotional tour de force is the embodiment of the Japanese term “mono no aware,” which describes a wistful awareness of life’s transience. In the way its characters are haunted by bygone moments in the face of a vast and shapeless future, 5 Centimetres per Second could function as a spiritual companion to the oeuvre of Wong Kar-wai, but whereas Wong’s lovelorn protagonists are stuck in the past, Shinkai’s move forward, steadily, in a state of melancholic acceptance. Time is itself a character here, a fact brought to our attention by shots of clocks, the evolution of technology alongside the characters’ aging, and scenes where narrative stakes ensure that the passing of each second is palpably felt. And yet it is precisely the ephemerality of these seconds that lends them elevated significance —fittingly, the film’s animation is breathtakingly detailed and tactile, allowing us to identify with the characters by having us inhabit each, vivid moment before it vanishes. – Jonah Jeng

48. The Adventures of Tintin (Steven Spielberg)

Leave it to Steven Spielberg to eke more thrills out of an animated feature than most directors could with every live-action tool at their disposal. The Adventures of Tintin is colored and paced like a child’s fantastical imagining of how Hergé’s comics might play in motion, and the extent to which viewers buy it depends largely on their willingness to give themselves over to narrative and technical flights of fancy. Me? Four-and-a-half years later, I’m still waiting for a follow-up with bated breath. – Nick Newman

47. Titan A.E. (Don Bluth, Gary Goldman and Art Vitello)

It’s the movie that took down Don Bluth, netted Fox a $100 million loss, and starred the young voices of Matt Damon and Drew Barrymore. From a script by Joss Whedon, John August, and Ben Edlund, Titan A.E. is a swashbuckle-y tale with stirring visuals and moments of sheer originality that now feels like a more-accomplished precursor to something such as Guardians of the Galaxy. If you’re going to go down, this is an impressive picture to sink with. – Dan Mecca

46. Metropolis (Rintaro)

Metropolis has more than a little in common with the apocalyptic orgy of violence of 1988 anime touchstone Akira, as the story follows the tragic inevitability of mans’ relationship with overwhelming power. But Rintaro’s Metropolis — which is based on Osama Tezuka’s manga and Fritz Lang’s canonical film — is also a story of overwhelming kindness in its central relationship between Kenichi, a well-intentioned and naïve child, and Tima, a cyborg capable of immense destruction. Distinguished by its washed-out watercolor character designs and its inventive cast of characters, Metropolis is a distinctly lighter take on the characteristically dreary dystopia genre. – Michael Snydel

45. Song of the Sea (Tomm Moore)

Animation has never shied away from grief. It’s the bedrock of everything from Grave of the Fireflies to the majority of Pixar’s filmography, but it’s rarely been as unbearably beautiful as in 2014’s unfairly overlooked Song of the Sea. Animated with a mythic tableau style, steeped in Celtic folklore, and filled with a cast of characters worthy of Hayao Miyazaki, Tomm Moore’s work is the rare heartwarming family film that knows it doesn’t need to compromise genuine emotion with fake-outs or Hollywood endings. – Michael Snydel

44. The Secret World of Arrietty (Hiromasa Yonebayashi)

While much of Studio Ghibli’s popularity focuses on the adored writer-director Hayao Miyazaki, some works from other directors deserve equal praise. One of them — which, yes, cheats a bit because Miyazaki scripted it — is The Secret World of Arrietty by first-time helmer Hiromasa Yonebayashi. The film follows a little boy’s fascination with the Borrowers — small humans that live in our world — and weaves the story of him and his family with Arrietty, one of the Borrowers. There are intensely dramatic moments as the Borrowers are constantly striving to survive amidst this world of luxury and easy life that the larger humans enjoy. Much like some of the best of Ghibli’s work, the film works on multiple levels and layers and thus becomes one of the studio’s most beautiful, enjoyable, and enduring works. – Bill Graham

43. ParaNorman (Chris Butler and Sam Fell)

A story of bullies and the bullied, Laika Studios’ second stop-motion film, ParaNorman, was unfortunately overshadowed by their astounding previous effort, Coraline. But time has been kind, and ParaNorman feels ahead of its time in both the exploration of darker themes (witch hunts, child murder, bigotry) and its juxtaposition of a Puritan New England ghost story and a vividly supernatural present. Buoyed by Jon Brion’s characteristically thoughtful score and an inventive reconfiguration of horror movie iconography, ParaNorman is a coming-of-age story that recognizes that even the “bad guys” have their reasons. – Michael Snydel

42. Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit (Nick Park and Steve Box)

Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit, Aardman Animation’s second feature collaboration with DreamWorks, brings Nick Park‘s brilliant claymation series about an absentminded inventor and his mute canine companion to the big screen. Working as humane pest removal specialists, Wallace and Gromit have hatched a plan to brainwash every hungry rabbit in town to dislike vegetables, preventing Gromit’s prized melon from being ruthlessly devoured. But the experiment backfires and the Were-Rabbit, a monstrous beast with an unquenchable appetite for veggies, is unleashed on the lush gardens of Tottington Holl. On par with the most uproarious shorts of Park’s career (working this time out with co-director Steve Box), the film slyly evokes fond memories of Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein in never treating its goofy leads as seriously as its surprisingly effective scares. It’s a shame that Park has announced the titular duo are likely retired, due to the failing health of voice actor Peter Sallis. Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit is a light-hearted and whimsically clever gem that also works as a charming introduction to the horror genre for young cinema-lovers. – Tony Hinds

41. Lilo & Stitch (Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois)

What other film can pull off starting with an all-out sci-fi adventure and transition into a heartful ode to culture and family? Before they delivered an even more impactful variation on a similar sort of creature-human bond with How to Train Your Dragon, Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois created this touching tale. Featuring a return to watercolor-painted backgrounds for Disney, as well as a reliance on 2D animation, it’s one of the company’s last in this era to have that long-missed tangibility. As often repeated in the film, “Family means nobody gets left behind,” and, by the end credits, you’ll feel like you’ve added a few new members to your own. – Jordan Raup

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See full article at The Film Stage »

25 underappreciated family movies of the last 20 years

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From Flushed Away and Hunchback to Titan A.E. and Sky High - the family movies that don't get the love they deserve...

When I sit through a film such as Zootropolis, Rango, Frozen, Wreck-It Ralph, Eddie The Eagle or Coraline, I can’t help but be thankful somebody has bothered. As a parent as well as a movie lover, I’ve grown to really dislike family movies that just turn up to act as a surrogate babysitter for 90 minutes, with no intention of becoming anybody’s favourite film. The films I'm going to talk about are the family movies therefore that I think both try and do something a bit more, yet continue to fly under many people's radar.

A bonus mention before we get going, and number 26 in the list, much to my surprise: Alvin & The Chipmunks 4. I was expecting next to zero from it, courtesy
See full article at Den of Geek »

Harlock Space Pirate 3-D

Ray guns! Space armadas! Storm troopers! Toei's manga became a pricey 3-D animated motion capture epic just three years ago, but was denied a release stateside. This collector's disc set gives us rude 'n' raucous space battles, along with a pirate's bounty of original Japanese extras. Don't worry, the 3-D visuals are excellent. Harlock: Space Pirate 3-D 3-D + 2-D Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 2013 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 115 (Japanese) 111 (International) min. / Kyaputen Harokku / Ship Date January 19, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 34.95 Original Music Tetsuya Takahashi Written by Harutoshi Fukui, Kiyoto Tareuchi from the manga by Leiji Matsuimoto Produced by Joseph Chou, Yoshi Ikezawa, Rei Kudo (Toei Animation) Directed by Shinji Aramaki

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Suppose they had a space war and nobody came? Toei Animation's 3-D extravaganza Harlock: Space Pirate 3-D was prepped and primed to take the world by storm, but like too many foreign super-productions it didn't even get a U.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Big Fish’ Writer John August Honored by Writers Guild

‘Big Fish’ Writer John August Honored by Writers Guild
Screenwriter John August (“Big Fish,” “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”) has been named the recipient of the Writers Guild of America West’s Valentine Davies Award.

The honor has been given in recognition of his humanitarian efforts, civic service and his role in fostering a community of writers. August will be honored at the Writers Guild Awards West Coast ceremony on Feb. 13 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles.

“John is the writer we’d all want to be: wildly intelligent, deeply practical, effortlessly inventive, and generous to a fault,” said WGA West President Howard A. Rodman.

“Whether he’s creating apps, campaigning for marriage equality, mentoring younger writers, podcasting with Craig Mazin, sitting on our Negotiating Committee, or constructing a school in Malawi, John has made service to the larger community a part of his second nature. Protip: when you find yourself in difficult straits, ask yourself ‘What would John August do?
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Joss Whedon on quitting Marvel, the reaction to Avengers: Age Of Ultron

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Joss Whedon has been chatting about how he dealt with the reaction to last year's Avengers: Age Of Ultron...

This story contains fruity language.

We've not heard too much from Joss Whedon since the release of last spring's Avengers: Age Of Ultron. The movie grossed over $1.3bn at the global box office, although met middling reviews, and earned nowhere near the acclaim of Whedon's initial Avengers picture.

Whedon was fairly open about the fact that he'd had to battle with Marvel over the movie, and he's since - as planned - moved away from the studio. And in a new Q&A he's conducted with the Oxford Union, he's talked more about the last year or two of his life.

"I sort of had my finger in all of the films in the second phase", he said, "but then I just had to concentrate only on Ultron,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Nerd Alert: Captain Phasma's Secret History, Saving Matt Damon and More

Nerd Alert: Captain Phasma's Secret History, Saving Matt Damon and More
Welcome to today's edition of Nerd Alert, where we have all the quirky, nerdy news that you crave in one convenient spot. What do we have in store for you on this wonderful Wednesday? A Quorra user has determined the cost of saving Matt Damon's characters in several movies, Die Hard gets the Honest Trailer treatment and the Millennium Falcon is recreated in LEGOs. But wait, there's more! The Captain America: Civil War trailer gets recreated with LEGOs and learn the fictional and humorous history of Star Wars: The Force Awakens character Captain Phasma. Sit back, relax and check out all that today's Nerd Alert has to offer.

The Secret History of Captain Phasma

One of the several new characters introduced in Star Wars: The Force Awakens was Captain Phasma, a First Order Stormtrooper who was in command of Finn (John Boyega) before he went rogue. Gwendoline Christie portrayed this nefarious character,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Dragon's Lair movie hits crowdfunding goal

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Don Bluth and Gary Goldman just moved one step closer to making a Dragon's Lair movie...

Don Bluth and Gary Goldman may well have got another movie off the ground, with the news that their Indiegogo appeal to bring videogame Dragon's Lair to the big screen has hit its funding target. That said, it's still the first step in a fairly lengthy adventure.

The crowdfunding appeal launched just over two weeks ago, and still has over a month left. However, over $260,000 is in the pot already, and that's going to be spent to put together a teaser presentation. Said presentation will then be used to pitch the film to investors, as the pair need $70m to actually get the film made. Which is a little beyond the reach of a crowdfunding campaign.

Bluth and Goldman have worked on films such as All Dogs Go To Heaven, Thumbelina,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Before The Martian: A look at Matt Damon's previous trips to space

Ridley Scott's film version of The Martian, adapted by Drew Goddard from the book by Andy Weir, is now upon us, and it boasts an impressive cast, including Matt Damon, Jessica Chastain, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Pena, and more. While the supporting cast are excellent performers, this article will focus on Matt Damon, who plays the lead role.

(Sadly, The Martian is not about DC's Martian Manhunter, aka J'onn J'onzz, the noble, telepathic, shape-shifting member of the Justice League. If it were, Matt Damon would be cast against type—as he always is—but is chameleonic enough as an actor to be able to pull it off anyway—as he always does. A more obvious casting choice would be someone like Blair Underwood (The Event, Marvel's Agents of Shield), who exudes both gravitas and humanity.)

While one might assume that The Martian will be the first time we've seen Jason Bourne in space,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Joss Whedon announces 'Victorian, female Batman' comic book project

Mr Joss Whedon has unveiled his new project - Twist - a comic book that promises to be a bit like a 'Victorian, female Batman'...

Speaking at San Diego Comic-Con, geek overlord Joss Whedon has unveiled his next project - a comic book called Twist.

This follows a number of rumours about what the writer/director would get up to after Avengers: Age Of Ultron. When we chatted to him a few months ago, he said it'd be 'nice to flex a different muscle' to big budget superhero movie-making.

Returning to comic book writing certainly fits that criteria, and his new project Twist sounds very Joss Whedon-y indeed. Apparently, the six-issue series - which is being published by Dark Horse Comics - will answer the pressing question "why isn’t there a Victorian, female Batman?"

This is the first cover, which appeared online following the announcement of the series.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. season 2 episode 20 review: Scars

Ahead of its two part season finale, Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. wraps up its Age Of Ultron connections and reshuffles the deck…

This review contains spoilers for this episode and Avengers: Age Of Ultron.

2.20 Scars

If there’s one truth that Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. has proved in recent weeks, it’s that at some stage, we’ll have to stop referring to its stronger episodes as rare highlights and instead admit that Marvel flagship show has actually become an all-round entertaining show in its own right.

This revelation occurred to me while watching Scars, the sort-of penultimate season 2 episode before next week’s two-part finale. As with any show, there are a few niggles in the episode (Ward’s reappearance seemed a little shoehorned-in during an episode that had stronger focuses elsewhere) but there was so much to like, which indicates that season 2 as a whole could well go down as
See full article at Den of Geek »

Avengers: Age Of Ultron's alternate endings

Joss Whedon’s Avengers: Age Of Ultron is raking in box office millions right now, but its ending wasn’t always set in stone…

Contains spoilers for Avengers: Age Of Ultron

Avengers: Age Of Ultron, then. It's a divisive chapter of the Marvel cinematic universe among critics, but nonetheless a box office behemoth which is well on its way to toppling the hefty total of the previous instalment in the superhero team-up franchise, The Avengers (or Avengers Assemble, if you rather, which you probably don’t).

Unlike most Marvel Studios films, Age Of Ultron didn’t have an end-of-credits sting (“we just didn’t have anything we loved” writer director Joss Whedon told us), but it did have a mid-credits Thanos tease and a memorable end to the film itself.

In case you need reminding: the pre-credits stage of the film concluded with Black Widow and Captain America recruiting a
See full article at Den of Geek »

Marvel's Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.: trailers tease Age Of Ultron link

Following on from last week's episode, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is advertising its direct links to the Avengers in these new trailers...

In the UK, many of us have seen Avengers: Age Of Ultron already. In the USA, though, the film comes out on Friday the 1st of May.

As such, last week's Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. episode teased elements of Joss Whedon's superhero crossover spectacular, while tomorrow's episode The Dirty Half Dozen is set to make the connections very overt indeed.

There are no spoilers for the film here, we'd argue, so have a look at these clips if you fancy a tease of how things are going to connect...

And here's another...

The Dirty Half Dozen airs tomorrow night (Tuesday the 28th of April) in America.

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TV News Rob Leane Marvel's Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Joss Whedon on Wonder Woman: "I was always DC-curious"

Joss Whedon admits his wish to do a Batman film, and reveals why he's unlikely to get a job directing a DC movie...

Avengers: Age Of Ultron is the second Marvel movie that Joss Whedon has directed, and it's also going to be the last one for a while. Joe and Anthony Russo are taking the helm for Avengers: Infinity War Parts One and Two, and Whedon's next directorial project is some way from being known, by the sounds of it.

But could it be a DC project? Whedon at one stage was developing a Wonder Woman movie of course, So would he still fancy a go at a DC movie project? "Sure, I'd be like, 'I have all these joke ideas'. And they'd be like 'no, we don't do that here'", he joked to IGN.

"I desperately wanted to do a Batman film – who doesn’t? And I wanted to do Wonder Woman.
See full article at Den of Geek »

22 questions about Avengers: Age Of Ultron answered

Spoilers: we've gone through Joss Whedon's Avengers: Age Of Ultron and tried to answer the many questions it raises....

This article contains major spoilers for Avengers: Age Of Ultron

If Avengers: Age of Ultron is anything, it's dense. It has to spin out of films, spin films out of itself, and tell its own story with a cast of seven heroes and three villains. There's a lot going on, and not everyone will have caught all of it. If you've seen Avengers: Age of Ultron and find yourself confused about any part of it, we've tried to answer the questions you might have about it. Be careful if you haven't seen the film, though – spoilers obviously abound!

1. What's Wakanda?

Visited by Ultron and later the Avengers, Wakanda is a fictional African state which is also the home (and kingdom of) of the Black Panther. Located in northeast Africa, it
See full article at Den of Geek »

Joss Whedon interview: Avengers, Marvel, Titan A.E.

Joss Whedon chats to us about Avengers: Age Of Ultron, Jason Statham, what he's up to next, and more...

Joss Whedon: assembler of Avengers, slayer of vampires, houser of dolls, vlogger of Doctor Horrible, and now, um, ageist of Ultron. To be fair, Joss Whedon is geek royalty, and needs no introduction. So hopefully, he won’t mind that we gave him such a naff one.

We got to chat with the man himself at the Avengers: Age Of Ultron press event, and here’s what happened...

From what we’ve heard about this one, it sounds like you had to trim down a lot in the editing room. Was there any particular favourite scene you wish you could have saved?

Well, there was more shirtless Thor. The DVD extras are going to be enormously popular. But no, for me, it’s really a couple of little exchanges that
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ranked: Every Summer Movie Season Since 1980 - Part 2

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We’ve reviewed every summer movie season since 1980 to find out which are the best, and which are the worst. Last week we posted our picks for the worst, and here we post our picks for the best.

2015 and 2016 may just be the most overthetop summer movie seasons yet. It seems like nearly every movie slated for a summer 2015 or 2016 release is heavily anticipated. Because of these impending summers of movie awesomeness, we’ve decided to take a look back at summer movie seasons of years past. The idea of the summer movie season is currently in full swing, but it didn’t catch on immediately. Hollywood had to do its fair share of experimenting to determine what types of films would be most successful. As a result, some summer movie seasons have been better than others. We’ve reviewed them all for you and ranked them from worst to best.
See full article at Cinelinx »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 2007

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 6 Feb 2014 - 06:08

Our series of lists devoted to underappreciated films brings us to the year 2007, and another 25 overlooked gems...

For some reason, the number three was a common factor in several blockbuster movies of 2007. The third film in the Pirates Of The Caribbean series (At World's End) dominated the box office, Spider-Man 3 marked Sam Raimi's last entry as director in the series, while Mike Myers went for a hat trick of hits with Shrek The Third.

I Am Legend was the third and most financially successful attempt to bring Richard Matheson's classic novel to the big screen, Rush Hour 3 marked Jackie Chan's last action pairing with Chris Tucker, while Zack Snyder's musky sword-swinger 300 was notable for having the number three in the title.

Iffy attempts at numerology aside, 2007 was also a superb for year for movies in general - particularly underappreciated ones,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 2000

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 28 Nov 2013 - 06:04

Our series of lists devoted to underappreciated films brings us to the year 2000, and another 25 overlooked gems...

The new millennium brought with it an eclectic range of hit films. Hong Kong action director John Woo brought us Mission: Impossible II, the most profitable film of the year at the box office. Ridley Scott enjoyed one of the biggest critical and financial successes of his career with Gladiator, while Robert Zemeckis created a memorable drama with Tom Hanks and a ball named Wilson in Cast Away.

From a comic book movie standpoint, 2000 was also a key year. X-Men not only established a successful film franchise which is still going, with X-Men: Days Of Future Past out next year, but also headed up a wave of big-budget Marvel adaptations which shows no sign of slowing down.

As ever, we've travelled far outside the
See full article at Den of Geek »
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