6.6/10
56,434
393 user 134 critic

Titan A.E. (2000)

A young man learns that he has to find a hidden Earth ship before an enemy alien species does in order to secure the survival of humanity.

Directors:

Don Bluth, Gary Goldman

Writers:

Hans Bauer (story), Randall McCormick (story) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
4,849 ( 725)

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From $3.99 on Prime Video

ON DISC
1 win & 6 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Matt Damon ... Cale Tucker (voice)
Bill Pullman ... Capt. Joseph Korso (voice)
John Leguizamo ... Gune (voice)
Nathan Lane ... Preed (voice)
Janeane Garofalo ... Stith (voice)
Drew Barrymore ... Akima (voice)
Ron Perlman ... Professor Sam Tucker (voice)
Alex D. Linz ... Young Cale (voice)
Tone Loc ... Tek (voice) (as Tone-Lõc)
Jim Breuer ... The Cook (voice)
Christopher Scarabosio ... Queen Drej (voice)
Jim Cummings ... Chowquin (voice)
Charles Rocket ... Firrikash / Slave Trader Guard (voice)
Ken Hudson Campbell ... Po (voice) (as Ken Campbell)
Tsai Chin ... Old Woman (voice)
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Storyline

One thousand years from now, aliens destroy Earth in fear of the Titan project. Some humans escape, becoming a downtrodden Diaspora, living in impoverished settlements. The mysterious Titan spacecraft also escapes, and its inventor has hidden it before dying. A spacecraft captain and its pilot, Korso and Akima, two humans, seek out Cale, the youthful son of the dead scientist and explain that he must help them find the Titan, which holds a mechanism to unite and save humanity. Cale refuses, but the arrival of the killer aliens persuades him to join Korso. Can he avoid his pursuers, know friend from foe, find the Titan, and embrace his humanity, a nature he has despised until now? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

15 years after Earth, humanity's last hope...is Titan A.E. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for action violence, mild sensuality and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Mandarin

Release Date:

16 June 2000 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Planet Ice See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$75,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$9,376,845, 18 June 2000, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$22,751,979, 3 September 2000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$36,755,000, 31 December 2000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sean Hayes were considered for the role of Preed. See more »

Goofs

During the chase scene in Tigrin Ice rings, when Akima says the line "I can't move they'll see us" Her hand is grasping the ship's controls in her left hand but they are missing from the CG set. See more »

Quotes

Preed: Just out of curiosity, do we have a plan B?
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Crazy Credits

The credits for the lead actors are each displayed as a computer readout displaying the actor's name, footage of the character played as well as vital statistics and personal data. See more »

Alternate Versions

The DVD includes deleted scenes, which, while some are still in pencil form, make the film more complete. They are as follows:
  • "Green Drink" - This is a longer version of the scene where Cale and Korso discuss the Titan. It includes Cale fixing the broken machine and more dialouge about his father and the Titan.
  • "Akima's Rescue" - This is another version of the scene where Korso and friends find Akima in the trade area. In this scene, she blows up an alarm and frees all the slaves.
  • "Ice Crystals- Extended Version" - This is basically an extended version of the famous ice crystals scene. It includes more dialouge between Cale and Akima (in pencil form), and scenes in different angles.
  • "Alternate Ending" - This is an extended ending where the Drej actually talk (not in subtitles) and more dialouge between Cale and Korso. Most of it is in pencil form, and it ends right after the Drej are destroyed.
See more »

Connections

References Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Over My Head
Written by Jeremy Popoff
Performed by Lit
Produced by Glen Ballard and Lit
Lit Performs Courtesy of RCA/Dirty Martini Records Label
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Visually Stimulating; entertains children and adults alike. *** (out of four)
10 July 2000 | by Movie-12See all my reviews

TITAN A. E. / (2000) *** (out of four)

"Titan A.E." is like a giant looming over movie animation landscape; it is one of the most visually bracing family fantasy adventures to come down the pike in years. The film's animation is wonderfully spectacular, visually enticing and entirely convincing. Directors Don Bluth and Gary Goldman enthrall the audience with a sweeping sense of atmosphere and action. This is the kind of cartoon that is mature to the level in which the characters and set designs could have been replaced with live action filmmaking without changing the movie's perspective.

The production takes place twenty-eight years after the third millennium. Planet Earth has been demolished by a cruel species called the Drej, who fear the potential intelligence of the human race. Cale (voiced by Matt Damon) is a young man working as a space dump attendant who believes his father abandoned him when he was a child. Cale doesn't know it yet, but he holds the key to the survival of the human race with a genetically coded map on his hand showing the course to the hidden position of a special spacecraft called the Titan.

Cale meets a young woman named Akima (voiced by Drew Barrymore), who cherishes conventional memorabilia of her late planet. She and her captain, Korso (voiced by Bill Pullman), and the navigator, Gune (John Leguizamo), set out to locate the vital Titan before the evil Drej can exterminate it along with mankind's future hope of existence.

Instead of our traditional, well-developed bad guy that posses serious threats to the protagonist's mission, in "Titan A.E." we receive something of a different sort: an underwritten alien race whose motives and backgrounds are unclear and undeveloped. The movie seems to know of this, however, therefore the film wisely switches villains in the second act. The story provides an interesting twist that supplies us with solid and comprehendible antagonism.

This movie's plot feels somewhat pieced together from previous science fiction fantasies like "Star Trek," "Star Wars," and "Lost in Space." John Whedon, Ben Edlund, and John August vividly detail a story that moves along steadily, but occasionally stalls to build momentum for the character's purpose for achieving goals. There is a scene on a spaceship holding Cale in captivity that feels trite and dual, but the film quickly rejuvenates itself with an exhilarating chase sequence. The film's plot would have been more involving if we knew more about the characters. They seem pretty interesting but we never really get to know them because the filmmakers were more concerned with special effects, a common misconception both animated and live action films.

This production is engaging and well animated; "Titan: After Earth" is smart to jolt a appropriate about of energy into its action scenes and contains sufficient amounts of style and wit to satisfy younger audiences as well to hold the attention of the older, more sophisticated viewers. It is not every day a cartoon is able to do that.


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