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The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

Trailer
2:02 | Trailer
A meek Hobbit from the Shire and eight companions set out on a journey to destroy the powerful One Ring and save Middle-earth from the Dark Lord Sauron.

Director:

Peter Jackson

Writers:

J.R.R. Tolkien (novel), Fran Walsh (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Popularity
92 ( 17)
Top Rated Movies #10 | Won 4 Oscars. Another 115 wins & 125 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alan Howard ... Voice of the Ring (voice)
Noel Appleby Noel Appleby ... Everard Proudfoot
Sean Astin ... Sam
Sala Baker ... Sauron
Sean Bean ... Boromir
Cate Blanchett ... Galadriel
Orlando Bloom ... Legolas
Billy Boyd ... Pippin
Marton Csokas ... Celeborn
Megan Edwards Megan Edwards ... Mrs. Proudfoot
Michael Elsworth Michael Elsworth ... Gondorian Archivist
Mark Ferguson ... Gil-galad
Ian Holm ... Bilbo
Christopher Lee ... Saruman
Lawrence Makoare ... Lurtz

Could Jake Gyllenhaal Save Middle-earth?

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Storyline

An ancient Ring thought lost for centuries has been found, and through a strange twist of fate has been given to a small Hobbit named Frodo. When Gandalf discovers the Ring is in fact the One Ring of the Dark Lord Sauron, Frodo must make an epic quest to the Cracks of Doom in order to destroy it. However, he does not go alone. He is joined by Gandalf, Legolas the elf, Gimli the Dwarf, Aragorn, Boromir, and his three Hobbit friends Merry, Pippin, and Samwise. Through mountains, snow, darkness, forests, rivers and plains, facing evil and danger at every corner the Fellowship of the Ring must go. Their quest to destroy the One Ring is the only hope for the end of the Dark Lords reign. Written by Paul Twomey <toomsp@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

ring | quest | hobbit | epic | elf | See All (292) »

Taglines:

Even the smallest person can change the course of the future. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for epic battle sequences and some scary images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

For the role of Lurtz, it took eleven hours for Lawrence Makoare's full costume and make-up to be applied. See more »

Goofs

To narrow a gap for leaping, Aragorn and Frodo direct a giant teetering column by leaning their bodies. Even by the interesting physics of Middle Earth it is patently impossible for just two people - let alone a man and a hobbit - to quickly shift a rock mass of thousands of tons by mere leaning, especially one already tipping the other way. One might suppose that Gandalf lent a helpful push with his wizardry, but there is no hint of such. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Galadriel: The world is changed. I feel it in the water. I feel it in the earth. I smell it in the air. Much that once was is lost, for none now live who remember it. It began with the forging of the Great Rings. Three were given to the Elves, immortal, wisest and fairest of all beings. Seven to the Dwarf lords, great miners and craftsmen of the mountain halls. And nine, nine rings were gifted to the race of Men, who, above all else, desire power. But they were, all of them, deceived, for ...
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Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits after the title has been shown. See more »

Alternate Versions

One photograph from unused publicity shots shows the four hobbits making their way through a swamp, presumably the Migewater Marshes from the novel. This sequence does not appear in the final cut of the movie but is included in the Extended Edition DVD See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Office: Diwali (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

In Dreams
Written by Fran Walsh and Howard Shore
Performed by Edward Ross
Courtesy of Reprise Records
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User Reviews

Embrace the magic
8 October 2002 | by RinaearSee all my reviews

It is with no surprise that Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring film has received such mixed critics. Many viewers refer to it as being childish, boring and uninteresting. Seems to me that it is bound to the same fate of Tolkien's books, destined to be a target for the same type of misunderstandings that keep attacking this literary masterpiece many decades after it's first publication.

Having read the books several years ago, I went to see this `impossible' film when it came out with many doubts on my mind. I really liked it, but left the theater with as many doubts as I had before. Was it perfect? Well, maybe not, but what an achievement. After watching it a few times on DVD, and thinking about it for some time now, I find myself loving this film more and more. Let me tell you why...

The Lord of the Rings is a fairy-tale of myth and fantasy. Peter Jackson directed a film that was considered, for a very long time, impossible to make, and not only for technical reasons. The narrative roots are incredibly long and detailed, and the storyline is deeply connected with the creation of a fantastic continent from a time unknown called `Middle Earth'. It's author, Tolkien, dedicated a considerable part of his life developing this continent's background, it's mythology and origins, it's different kinds of people, cultures and languages, and therefore it's geographic references are determinant to the unfolding of the story of the One Ring.

Peter Jackson went out to achieve the impossible and came out with a recreation of the original that is pure and true to the story in every detail. The first time the four hobbits meet a black rider on the road, for example, is absolutely faithful to the feeling of the book. The assault of the riders at Weathertop is another great example, and it captures that feeling of danger, density and atmosphere that are the main characteristics of the tale. Jackson also took some liberties with the story, and made some right choices along the way. If the so called `purists' may not approve the removal of Tom Bombadil altogether, it should be comprehensible that the travel from Hobbiton to Rivendel is a very long and detailed one and could easily make a movie on it's own. I felt more uneasy with how short the Council of Elrond was. In the book, the council is where the whole story of the rings is first explained, and many passages from the past ages of Middle Earth are unveiled. It is a fascinating moment of the story, that had to be shortened for obvious reasons. Still, after some consideration, I now agree with the options made by Peter Jackson, and think that the movie prologue narrated by Galadriel was the wisest choice. The magic is all there when Gandalf shuts his eyes the moment Frodo stands in the council and says `I will take the ring'. It is there at Moria's Gate, and at the fall of Boromir. It is a powerful film that doesn't fit the rhythm of the standard Hollywood action movie. It is a film that breeds, that takes time to unfold, it's tale branching in every direction.

I could go on and on, talking about all the different elements that bring this film close to perfection, but I'll end saying that deep down, this is not about action, beards and big monsters. The greatest thing about this film, to me, is that it brought me back to a time when I was in love with a different world where everything was possible. Reading The Lord of the Rings night after night, I came to understand what this thing of `mankind' really was all about. The corruption of absolute power, the importance and value of friendship, the inevitability of growing up, the strength of hope... That this film could capture that magic, and be a new bearer to it's message of humanism, is a statement to it's greatness. Gandalf's words, that even the smallest person may change the course of the world, and have a part to play in the destiny of all, are immortal.

In the end, this is a wonderful film, but that doesn't mean you are going to like it. I cannot tell you what it is like to see this film if you don't know or love the book. But I hope it may plant a seed on your heart to discover a great world of fantasy, beauty and humanity. I believe Tolkien would have liked that.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

New Zealand | USA

Language:

English | Sindarin

Release Date:

19 December 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring: The Motion Picture See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$93,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$47,211,490, 23 December 2001

Gross USA:

$315,710,750

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$888,368,777
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Special DVD Extended Edition) | (Blu Ray Extended Edition) | (DVD Widescreen Edition)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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