6.9/10
354
10 user 3 critic

The Fire That Burns (1997)

La ville dont le prince est un enfant (original title)
Two boys in their early teens in a strictly-run pre-WWII Catholic School form a firm friendship which is troubled by an abbot who is obsessed with the younger of the students.

Director:

Christophe Malavoy

Writers:

Didier Decoin (adaptation), Henry de Montherlant (play)
Reviews
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Christophe Malavoy ... L'abbé de Pradts
Michel Aumont ... Le père supérieur
Naël Marandin Naël Marandin ... Sevrais
Clément van den Bergh Clément van den Bergh ... Souplier
Pierre-Arnaud Juin Pierre-Arnaud Juin ... Habert
Pierre-Alexis Hollenbeck Pierre-Alexis Hollenbeck ... Linsbourg
Michel Dussauze Michel Dussauze ... Prial
Luc Levy Luc Levy ... Homme de peine
Alain Gilbert Alain Gilbert ... Surveillant de la cantine
Luc Denoux Luc Denoux ... Maître de chant
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Storyline

Two boys in their early teens in a strictly-run pre-WWII Catholic School form a firm friendship which is troubled by an abbot who is obsessed with the younger of the students.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Some kids should be left the hell alone.

Genres:

Drama

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Naël Marandin, appearing in the film as the older boy, had previously performed in the stage version in the role of the younger boy. See more »

User Reviews

 
Subtle Drama about "Love"
22 April 2012 | by TroyeEvansSee all my reviews

When it comes to an overall impression of this film, amid an organized story and compellingly emotional performances, it is still not absolutely satisfying, for it loses its grip when the film ends.

The story mainly depicts the relationships of two friends of quite an age difference and a priest in a strictly-run boarding school. It is a movie that takes the subtle approach when tackling sensitive topics. The film uses characters of difficult purposes and thoughts to discuss "love", and the difference between a healthy friendship and a improper one.

The subtlety sets in when ideas are sometimes expressed vaguely through the kind of talk you would expect from priests. The religious overtone veils the story as the plot nears its end, with relatively lengthy scenes of half-debate and half-reflection, bringing to movie to a closure. The ending is quite abrupt, though I account it challenging to end it any other way.

"The Fire that Burns" is along the lines of relationships and forbidden feelings, with religious overtones and philosophical as well as moral concerns. It is a simple story, but with an incredible depth of sentimental strength.


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Details

Country:

France

Language:

French

Release Date:

7 March 1997 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Fire That Burns See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »

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