6.8/10
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284 user 87 critic

Sliding Doors (1998)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy | 1 May 1998 (USA)
A London woman's love life and career both hinge, unknown to her, on whether or not she catches a train. We see it both ways, in parallel.

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Popularity
4,344 ( 68)

On Disc

at Amazon

6 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Helen
... James
... Gerry
... Lydia
Zara Turner ... Anna
Douglas McFerran ... Russell
Paul Brightwell ... Clive
... Claudia
... James's Mother
... Paul
Terry English ... Kind Cabbie
Paul Stacey ... Man on Tube
... Cheeky Bloke
Joanna Roth ... Suspicious Girl
... Defensive Bloke
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Storyline

In London, the public relation Helen is fired from her position in a PR company. While returning home, she does not catch the train in the subway. But in another possibility of her life, she catches the train in the subway. The story shows two parallel lives of Helen: in one life, she stays with her boyfriend Gerry, and in the other life, she finds that Gerry cheats her with Lydia and falls in love with James Hammerton. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There are two sides to every story. Helen is about to live both of them ...at the same time. Romance was never this much fun. See more »


Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

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Release Date:

1 May 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dos vidas en un instante  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$834,817, 26 April 1998, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$11,883,495, 30 August 1998

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$67,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Peter Howitt got the idea for the film after almost getting hit by a car. He was late in meeting a friend, and innocently walking along London's Charing Cross Road. "I couldn't decide if I should run for the train or first call my mate at a public phone," Howitt recalled. "I impulsively dashed across the street, and was nearly hit by a car, and that brush with death got me thinking. Something inside my head thought, 'That's interesting. What if he had hit me then?' What are the knock-on effects, the domino effects."

Seven years separated that fateful near-death experience and the finished product. In between, there were 20 script rewrites, thousands of pounds of debt, and one nervous breakdown. "All I could do was stay in my flat in Fulham and cry and write the script for Sliding Doors," Howitt revealed. "The worst lasted about three months. Then I slowly began to get better. Now I'm really glad it happened." He also stopped getting his hair cut until he was done with the movie. See more »

Goofs

When John and Helen stand talking on a street corner, her blond hair is sometimes falling into her left eye, and sometimes combed up. See more »

Quotes

Lydia: Gerry, I'm a woman! We don't say what we WANT! But we reserve the right to get pissed off if we don't get it. That's what makes us so fascinating! And not a little bit scary.
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Connections

Referenced in Amores Perros (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Bennie and the Jets
Written by Elton John & Bernie Taupin
Performed by Elton John
Courtesy of Mercury Records Limited by arrangement with PolyGram Film and TV Music
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User Reviews

 
Where was I when this film first appeared

I don't remember reading a thing about this movie when it originally appeared, and that's odd because I enjoy Gwyneth Paltrow's work. I caught up with it on DVD, and I thought it was a superior movie with an extremely interesting premise and splendid performances by Paltrow's co-stars. Without giving too much away, the film deals with two separate scenarios that evolve from Paltow's (a) catching or (b) missing a subway train. The director manages skillfully to lay the two stories down alongside one another without confusing either one. Although the two Paltrows are distinguished by different hair styles, even that isn't really necessary. She (becomes) happy in one story, desperately unhappy in the other. She succeeds (eventually) in one story, fails in the other. She is the same character but entirely different. As she proved in "Shakespeare in Love," this girl can act. There aren't many films where chance causes alternate fates that are followed through to a rather surprising end. Worth seeing for that reason alone. Plus Gwyneth Paltrow, of course.


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