Nil by Mouth (1997) - News Poster

(1997)

News

Gary Oldman’s ‘Flying Horse,’ Margot Robbie’s ‘Birds Of Prey’ & Ben Affleck’s ‘Has-Been’ Among 19 Films Snaring California Tax Incentives

  • Deadline
Gary Oldman’s ‘Flying Horse,’ Margot Robbie’s ‘Birds Of Prey’ & Ben Affleck’s ‘Has-Been’ Among 19 Films Snaring California Tax Incentives
The day after Comic-Con wrapped up, one of Batman’s craziest nemesis, an Oscar winning former regular in Christopher Nolan’s Caped Crusader franchise and the current Batman himself were among the big winners of the latest allocation of feature film tax credits from the state of California’s $330 million annual program.

Warner BrosMargot Robbie led and Cathy Yan helmed Birds of Prey snagged the largest incentive this round of the 19 films given the nod by the Golden State with $12.6 million in tax credits. Gary Oldman’s second directorial effort, the historical California drama Flying Horse secured a galloping $5.04 million. That sum from the state makes Horse third among this first big screen round of the fourth year of California’s expanded effort to keep movies in the home of Hollywood.

With $52.2 million in credits on the table this time, Birds of Prey, Darkest Hour’s Oldman’s self-penned
See full article at Deadline »

Gary Oldman to write, direct and star in Flying Horse

Following his Oscar-winning performance in Darkest Hour, Gary Oldman has now set his next project, with Deadline reporting that he is set to write, direct and star in the fact-based drama Flying Horse. It will mark his second directorial feature after 1997’s acclaimed drama Nil By Mouth.

According to the site, the movie will tell the story of Eadweard Mubridge, one of the fathers of the moving image who in 1872 was contracted by a former California governor to capture a horse in-motion. However, after discovering his wife was having an affair, the story turns into a tale of revenge, murder and the search for justice.

“We long to make good movies, and that means good stories—and there are few stories as good as these events,” said Oldman and producing partner Doug Urbanski. “Launching the first feature from our newly formed production company, Flying Studios, with Tucker Tooley makes the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Gary Oldman To Star In, Direct, Write ‘Flying Horse’ For Tooley Entertainment

  • Deadline
Gary Oldman To Star In, Direct, Write ‘Flying Horse’ For Tooley Entertainment
Exclusive: Hot off his Oscar for Darkest Hour, Gary Oldman has been set to direct and star in Flying Horse, a fact-based story of a photographer who helped develop the moving picture, but whose own dark moments defined his life. The script was written by Oldman.

Flying Horse captures the story of Eadweard Muybridge, the photographer who was considered one of the true fathers of the moving image. In 1872, Muybridge was living the life as a successful photographer, contracted by the former governor of California to capture a horse-in-motion. And then, his life exploded, when he discovered his wife Flora was having an affair with the dapper critic Major Harry Larkyns. Muybridge’s story turns to one of revenge, murder, and the search for justice. He killed his wife’s lover, and then was acquitted on grounds of justifiable homicide.

Oldman’s longtime producing partner Doug Urbanski is producing with Tucker Tooley,
See full article at Deadline »

Cannes: ‘Gotti’ Gala Added; Masterclasses Set With Travolta, Coogler, Oldman, Nolan

  • Deadline
Cannes: ‘Gotti’ Gala Added; Masterclasses Set With Travolta, Coogler, Oldman, Nolan
With less than a week to go before the Cannes Film Festival kicks off, final arrangements continue to be put in place. Along with the previously announced Christopher Nolan, masterclasses are to be delivered by Black Panther helmer Ryan Coogler; this year’s Best Actor Oscar winner Gary Oldman; and John Travolta who will also attend a private world premiere Special Gala Screening of Teflon Don biopic Gotti. Cannes has confirmed the May 15 screening is not part of the Official Selection.

During the festival, the four Rendez-Vous with the artists will be held in the Salle Bunuel and will replace the Leçon de Cinéma. The directors and actors have been invited to share their work and passion, with a focus on American and English cinema.

Coogler, who first appeared in Cannes with 2013 breakout Fruitvale Station, is first up on May 10. That film took the Prix de l’Avenir in the Un Certain Regard section.
See full article at Deadline »

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won the very first BAFTA Award of the evening on Feb. 18 when it was named Best British Film. And it ended the night by claiming the Best Picture prize. That marked just the second time since the British academy reintroduced Best British Film in 1992 that the same movie won both awards. The only other double dipper was “The King’s Speech,” which went to win Best Picture at the Oscars in 2011.

It might seem odd that a film like “Three Billboards,” which is set in the American heartland, qualified for consideration as Best British Film. However, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and co-financed by UK broadcaster Channel 4.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]

Over the last quarter century, seven other British films have been named Best Picture at the BAFTAs: “Howards End
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]
The 2018 British Academy Film Awards were held on Sunday, Feb. 18 at Royal Albert Hall in London. The 71st annual Baftas hosted by Joanna Lumley (“Absolutely Fabulous”) serves as a preview of next month’s Oscars. Final voting for the 90th annual Academy Awards begins on Tuesday (Feb. 20).

As at the Oscars, “The Shape of Water” leads among nominated films at these important precursor prizes with a whopping 12 bids. “Darkest Hour” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” are tied for second place with nine nominations each. “Blade Runner 2049” and “Dunkirk” are in contention for eight BAFTA Awards apiece while “I, Tonya” is up for five and both “Call Me by Your Name” and “Phantom Thread” contend in four categories.

Our exclusive BAFTA odds were almost fool-proof. We correctly predicted that “Three Billboards” would be the big winner, taking home five of the top awards: Best Picture, Best Actress (Frances McDormand
See full article at Gold Derby »

BAFTAs flashback: 20 years before Churchill, Gary Oldman won for writing the ‘autobiographical’ ‘Nil by Mouth’ [Watch]

BAFTAs flashback: 20 years before Churchill, Gary Oldman won for writing the ‘autobiographical’ ‘Nil by Mouth’ [Watch]
Gary Oldman is the overwhelming favorite to take home the Best Actor BAFTA Sunday for his portrayal of former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. It’d be his third BAFTA overall, but his first for acting; his first two wins came 20 years ago for writing and producing Best Original Screenplay and Best British Film winner “Nil by Mouth.”

Based on his childhood, “Nil by Mouth” was Oldman’s writing and directorial debut, following a dysfunctional working class family coping with addiction and violence. Ray Winstone and Kathy Burke received BAFTA nominations for their performances as the husband and wife Ray and Val, respectively. Oldman’s sister Laila Morse made her acting debut as Val’s mother Janet and won a British Independent Film Award for Most Promising Newcomer.

See 2018 BAFTAs: Complete racetrack odds in 21 categories

“This film is in spirit, if not directly autobiographical, and my family were the inspiration for it,
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?
“Darkest Hour” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” each reaped nine nominations for the 2018 BAFTA Awards. Among these are bids for Best British Film. While that nomination for the former makes sense given the subject matter and pedigree of Joe Wright‘s biopic about prime minister Winston Churchill, the latter doesn’t appear to be British. However, while the film is set in the American heartland, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and that qualified it for consideration in this category.

Both films also number among the five in contention for Best Picture, alongside the American-made “The Shape of Water” and the international co-productions “Call Me By Your Name” and “Dunkirk.” Fans of either of “Darkest Hour” or “Three Billboards” should be rooting for one of their rivals in the Best British Film race — “The Death of Stalin,” “God’s Own Country,” “Lady Macbeth” or “Paddington 2” — to win on Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 BAFTAs: Which acting favorite is most vulnerable to an upset? [Poll]

2018 BAFTAs: Which acting favorite is most vulnerable to an upset? [Poll]
Sunday’s BAFTA Awards mark the fourth leg of Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”), Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) and Sam Rockwell’s (“Three Billboards”) quest to be the first group of acting winners to sweep all five televised awards. But BAFTA might be tricky for all four of them to pull off.

Since BAFTA moved up its ceremony before the Oscars 17 years ago, it sometimes moves in lockstep with the precursors and rubberstamp Oscar frontrunners. Other times BAFTA, whose lineups don’t always match the Oscars’, marches to the beat of its own drum and anoint one of its own British stars or offer some clarity to an unsettled race — its supporting winners Tilda Swinton (2007’s “Michael Clayton”) and Mark Rylance (2015’s “Bridge of Spies”) went on to claim Oscars.

See 2018 Oscars: Will all four acting winners pull off an unprecedented sweep?

McDormand, Oldman,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gary Oldman films: 15 greatest movies, ranked worst to best, include ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Sid and Nancy,’ ‘JFK,’ ‘Dracula’

  • Gold Derby
Gary Oldman films: 15 greatest movies, ranked worst to best, include ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Sid and Nancy,’ ‘JFK,’ ‘Dracula’
Gary Oldman might finally win his first career Oscar in March for his role as Winston Churchill in the film “Darkest Hour.” Surprisingly it’s only his second Oscar nomination after his first for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” in 2012, also as Best Actor. Where does his latest movie rank among his greatest of all time in our photo gallery (view above)?

Despite his long and very successful film career Oldman hasn’t been recognized very often by awards groups. He received one Emmy nomination (for a guest appearance on “Friends” of all things) but has never even been nominated for a Golden Globe. Back in his native country of England, the BAFTAs have nominated him twice before this year as an actor (for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and “Prick up Your Ears”) and awarded him two trophies for a film he directed called “Nil by Mouth” (he won for the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gary Oldman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Gary Oldman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Gary Oldman might finally win his first career Oscar in March for his role as Winston Churchill in the film “Darkest Hour.” Surprisingly it’s only his second Oscar nomination after his first for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” in 2012, also as Best Actor. Where does his latest movie rank among his greatest of all time in our photo gallery (view above)?

Despite his long and very successful film career Oldman hasn’t been recognized very often by awards groups. He received one Emmy nomination (for a guest appearance on “Friends” of all things) but has never even been nominated for a Golden Globe. Back in his native country of England, the BAFTAs have nominated him twice before this year as an actor (for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and “Prick up Your Ears”) and awarded him two trophies for a film he directed called “Nil by Mouth” (he won for the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ruth Wilson & Sean Bean Head Down A ‘Dark River’ For Clio Barnard [BFI London Film Fest Review]

For the past few decades, gritty arthouse British movies have invariably been an urban affair: from Mike Leigh to “Nil By Mouth” and “Trainspotting”, to “Kidulthood” and “Red Road,” almost every element of contemporary city life in the U.K. has been mapped. But there’s been an interesting trend in the last year or so as filmmakers have finally headed out into the countryside, with a number of the most notable films of the last year looking at the difficulties of rural farm life.

Continue reading Ruth Wilson & Sean Bean Head Down A ‘Dark River’ For Clio Barnard [BFI London Film Fest Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Jawbone review – British boxing drama packs plenty of punch

Johnny Harris is excellent as a fighter struggling to overcome alcoholism in Thomas Napper’s debut as director

The familiar boxing movie trajectory doesn’t lessen the forceful punch of this underdog story. Written by and starring Johnny Harris, this is a strikingly accomplished portrait of a booze-sick broken soul hauling himself back up from rock bottom. It’s a feature debut from a director who has clearly made sure he’s at fighting weight: Thomas Napper honed his skills taking charge of second units for Joe Wright.

There’s a level of technical polish here that elevates this lean little story. Sound design bleeds into a satisfyingly textured score by Paul Weller. The exemplary cinematography by Tat Radcliffe favours the kind of intimacy that lets us see the pain seeping through Jimmy McCabe’s (Harris’s) skin along with the vodka sweats. In the ring, the disorienting duck and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

First Look At Gary Oldman As Winston Churchill In Joe Wright’s Darkest Hour

Gary Oldman stars as Winston Churchill for director Joe Wright in Darkest Hour, which has begun production in the U.K. Focus Features holds worldwide rights to the Working Title Films production as part of the company’s renewed global initiative.

Focus will release Darkest Hour domestically on November 24th, 2017 in the U.S. and Universal Pictures International (Upi) will distribute the film globally, beginning with the U.K. on December 29th, 2017.

The original screenplay of Darkest Hour is by Anthony McCarten, an Academy Award nominee and BAFTA Award winner as screenwriter of Focus and Working Title’s Best Picture Oscar nominee The Theory of Everything. Mr. McCarten and Academy Award nominee and BAFTA Award winner Lisa Bruce (The Theory of Everything) are producing Darkest Hour with Working Title co-chairs Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, and BAFTA Award winner Douglas Urbanski (Nil by Mouth), reteaming with Focus and Working Title following Tinker,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Sweariest Films In Movie History

It’s not often that you get a ‘Bad cop’, ‘worse cop’ type affair when it comes to classic cop films. That, however, is just what you get with War on Everyone, directed by John Michael McDonagh and starring Alexander Skarsgård and Michael Pena. They play two corrupt cops in New Mexico and they don’t give a damn about who they blackmail or frame; until they come across someone even more despicable than they are. Let’s just say, these two detectives couldn’t possibly kiss their mothers with the colourful language they use. In that vein, we’ve decided to take a look at some of the films whose language has raised some questionable eye brows from society. War on Everyone is out in UK cinemas on 7th October.

Wolf Of Wall Street

Pretty large number, right? Well that’s how many times the f-word (in all forms
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Canine out of 10? Match the dog to the movie – quiz

As Laurie Anderson’s Heart of a Dog barks its message of puppy love to cinemas this week, how well do you know other movie mutts?

Nil by Mouth

Layer Cake

Snatch

Trainspotting

There's Something About Mary

Room

Silver Linings Playbook

San Andreas

Bowfinger

Couples Retreat

Scary Movie 2

Spy Hard

The Accidental Tourist

Shallow Hal

The Jerk

Moonstruck

Suspiria

Don't Look Now

The Omen

Scanners

The Campaign

The Artist

Movie 43

Zoolander 2

The Family

Empire State

In Bruges

Only Lovers Left Alive

Stand By Me

Gremlins

Lethal Weapon 2

The Lost Boys

Tootsie

Short Circuit

Planes, Trains & Automobiles

The War of the Roses

The Grapes of Wrath

Bringing Up Baby

High Sierra

Rebecca

7 and above.

Top dog

4 and above.

That was ruff

0 and above.

Beethoven's last

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Most Influential British Director You’ve Never Heard Of

This week Neil Calloway looks at the career of an overlooked director…

Imagine a director who gave early roles to Ray Winstone, Tim Roth and Gary Oldman, who had a film remade by Gus Van Sant, who gave Danny Boyle one of his first producing credits, and who inspired Paul Greengrass.

Alan Clarke was that director, and though he has gone sadly underappreciated, a new season of his films at the British Film Institute, as well as a re-release of his work on blu-ray and DVD, should go some way to restoring his reputation.

Clarke worked largely in television, making the sort of standalone films that gave Mike Leigh and Ken Loach their breaks but are sadly absent from TV nowadays. His films dealt with glue sniffing Neo Nazis, yuppies, football hooligans and the futile cycle of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland; in short, these weren’t the big screen
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – Nil by Mouth (1997)

Nil by Mouth, 1997.

Directed by Gary Oldman.

Starring Ray Winstone, Kathy Burke, Laila Morse and Charlie Creed-Miles.

Synopsis:

Depicting the lives of a dysfunctional, South London family. Aggressive Ray and junkie Billy are central roles as we see how their flaws bleed into their home lives and affect others.

There is a moment, on the tube, as Billy (Charlie Creed-Miles) begs for change. A girl, with her friends, cannot assist and as Billy continues down the train we see the roll of her eyes. In 2015, nearly 20 years after Gary Oldman’s directorial debut, Nil by Mouth, we still see this poverty and desperation on the trains. The eternal conflict as we choose not to support, against our instincts, as “we know where the money will go”. What is so effective in Oldman’s brutal film, is how we know intimately the family, friends and background of Billy. We also see his sister,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Big Brother: Jack tops up his spray tan as the final prize fund is announced

Big Brother has revealed the final prize fund, as Cash Bomb reached its conclusion.

In highlights airing tonight (July 13), Jack steps up to the plate - after taking £23,900 for himself the previous day - to undergo a series of challenges to raise the winner's pot.

Big Brother 2015: Ranking the 6 finalists from worst to best

Below is a round-up of all the tasks and how Jack fared:

1. Nil by mouth

Jack's first task is to go 'nil by mouth' until further notice - that is, he is not allowed to eat anything and can only drink water.

Big Brother teases Jack by providing a McDonald's to the other housemates for breakfast, as well as fried chicken and chips (Jack's favourite food) for lunch.

He successfully resists temptation and adds £2,000 to the prize fund.

2. Swimming in fish guts

Jack is then instructed to submerge himself in fish guts in a paddling pool.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Gary Oldman: 5 Awesome Performances And 5 That Sucked

Lionsgate

You’re unlikely to see a more star-studded film this weekend – unless you go in for your umpteenth viewing of Furious 7, and nobody would blame you – than Child 44. Tom Rob Smith’s bestelling novel of a few years ago hits the big screens thanks to future Assassin’s Creed director Daniel Espinosa, who tells a story of child murder in Stalin-era Soviet Russia with Tom Hardy, Vincent Cassel, Noomi Rapace, and Gary Oldman as General Timur Nesterov.

After spending a good couple of decades as an “actor’s actor”, the sort of performer whose best work is done on the stage or in smaller films (whilst occasionally dipping into the mainstream to pay the bills), Oldman has comfortably settled into the Golden Middle Age of his career. His talent is universally recognised, he’s a household name, and he’s getting more work than ever.

Between Christopher Nolan
See full article at Obsessed with Film »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed