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How Kevin Spacey Has Addressed His Sexuality Over the Years: 'Everybody Has the Right to a Private Life'

How Kevin Spacey Has Addressed His Sexuality Over the Years: 'Everybody Has the Right to a Private Life'
Kevin Spacey — who has been notoriously protective over keeping his private life a secret — came out as gay Sunday after actor Anthony Rapp accused the House of Cards star of inappropriate sexual advances when he was 14 years old.

Rapp, now 46, alleged that then-26-year-old Spacey invited him to his Manhattan apartment for a party in 1986. (They were both starring in hit Broadway plays at the time.) Rapp says he was the only teen at the party and spent most of the evening in a bedroom watching television. After the party ended, he said, Spacey came into the room, picked him
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Win a Clint Eastwood 40 Film Collection boxset

Author: Competitions

To mark the release of Clint Eastwood 40 Film Collection, out now, we’ve been given a copy of the boxset to give away on DVD.

For nearly 40 years, Clint Eastwood has called Warner Bros home. This essential collection contains the extraordinary films created during his partnership with the studio, where Eastwood opened Malpaso Productions in 1975. The deluxe boxset includes: Where Eagles Dare (1968), Kelly’s Heroes (1970), Dirty Harry (1971), Magnum Force (1973), The Enforcer (1976), The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976), The Gauntlet (1977), Every Which Way but Loose (1978), Bronco Billy (1980), Any Which Way You Can (1980), Honkytonk Man (1982), Firefox (1982), Sudden Impact (1983), City Heat (1984), Tightrope (1984), Pale Rider (1985), Heartbreak Ridge (1986), Bird (1988), The Dead Pool (1988), Pink Cadillac (1989), White Hunter, Black Heart (1990), The Rookie (1990), Unforgiven (1992), A Perfect World (1993), The Bridges of Madison County (1995), Absolute Power (1997), Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997), True Crime (1999), Space Cowboys (2000), Blood Work (2002), Mystic River (2003), Flags of Our Fathers (2006), Letters from Iwo Jima
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Clint Eastwood Is Returning to Acting

Clint Eastwood Is Returning to Acting
Clint Eastwood is one of those rare Hollywood stars who is a legend both in front of and behind the camera. While he's best known to most audiences as an actor, with decades of iconic performances, but he has also established himself as one of our finest filmmakers as well. In recent years, the multi-hyphenate has focused his energies more on filmmaking and less in acting, with his last on screen performance coming in his 2012 baseball movie entitled Trouble With the Curve, where he played an aging baseball scout. During an appearance at the Cannes Film Festival, the Hollywood icon suggested that he eventually will make his return to acting.

Variety attended a master class being put on by the actor-filmmaker at the Cannes Film Festival, where he discussed a variety of topics. The filmmaker stated that he does miss performing "once in a while but not often," while hinting
See full article at MovieWeb »

Jack Thompson's wisdom: life's crowning glory is the here and now

His voice is indelibly laid down in minds of Australians who have watched his film career unfold over five decades: from Breaker Morant to The Man From Snowy River; from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil to The Sum of Us. Jack Thompson’s skill as an actor is echoed in his abiding love of poetry and memories of the father who introduced him to it. The power of poetry, he says, keeps him centred in the here and now

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray Deal of the Week: 3 Warner Archive Blu-rays for $35

There are many great sales online this week, but the folks at Amazon are treating us to something special: 3 Warner Archive Blu-rays for $35.

While this might not be the lowest that we’ve seen prices on these Blu-rays (the WB Shop has had 5 for $50 sales in the past that have included Warner Archive Blu-rays), it is certainly a good deal on great films.

It looks as though many of these discs are selling quickly, and the time out from when they’ll ship for some of the more popular titles is growing. Below you’ll find a list of the titles which are included in this promotion.

As always, these are affiliate links and will help support this site, should you choose to make any purchases through them.

42nd Street A Mighty Wind Beware The Batman: Dark Justice Season 1 Part 2 Big Sleep Body Snatchers Cat On A Hot Tin Roof
See full article at CriterionCast »

Off The Shelf – Episode 104 – New Blu-ray Releases for September 27th 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of September 27th, 2016.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Links to Amazon 7th Victim, The/Shadows in the Dark An American Werewolf in London Beyond the Valley of the Dolls Bill & Ted’s Most Excellent Collection Blood Diner Central Intelligence Chopping Mall Dekalog Guyver Highlander : 30th Anniversary Howard Lovecraft And The Frozen Kingdom Hunt for the Wilderpeople Isle of the Dead/Bedlam Kamikaze ’89 Leopard Man, The/Ghost Ship, The Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Milky Way Neon Demon Patterns The Shallows The Shape of Things to Come Slugs Two Films By Douglas Sirk Double Feature Valley of the Dolls Warcraft Credits Ryan Gallagher (Twitter / Website / Wish List) Brian Saur (Twitter / Website / Instagram / Wish List) Donate via PayPal
See full article at CriterionCast »

Directors' Trademarks: Clint Eastwood

  • Cinelinx
Directors’ trademarks is a series of articles that examines the “signatures” that filmmakers leave behind in their work. This month, we’re examining the trademark style and calling signs of Clint Eastwood as director.

Clint Eastwood became an american film star in the 1960’s thanks to his acting performances in a number of western films. As he began to branch out with new roles in front of the camera, he sought out to have more creative input into the types of film projects that he would be involved in. One way he was able to accomplish this was by creating his own production company which eventually allowed him to work behind the camera as director. His first film as director was 1971’s Play Misty For Me, which was well received by critics and did well at the box office. HIs second film as director was High Plains Drifter (1973), in which he also starred.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Kim McGuire, ‘Hatchet-Face’ in John Waters’ ‘Cry-Baby’, Dies at 60

  • The Wrap
Kim McGuire, ‘Hatchet-Face’ in John Waters’ ‘Cry-Baby’, Dies at 60
Kim McGuire, best known for playing Mona “Hatchet-Face” Malnorowski in the John Waters film “Cry-Baby,” has died. She was 60. The former actress became sick earlier this week, and was eventually admitted to a Florida hospital on Tuesday, her husband Gene told TMZ. She was diagnosed with pneumonia, but failed to respond to treatment, and died on Wednesday. McGuire was born in New Orleans in 1955. She originally intended to follow her father into practicing law, but found herself drawn to acting. Also Read: Lady Chablis, Famed Drag Performer in 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,' Dies at 59 “Cry-Baby,
See full article at The Wrap »

Newswire: R.I.P. The Lady Chablis, drag legend

Variety is reporting that legendary drag performer The Lady Chablis has died at the age of 59. The heart and soul of Savannah’s famed Club One dance club and a mainstay of the Southern Lgbt entertainment scene, the “Grand Empress” rose to national prominence in the mid-’90s, when author John Berendt featured her in his bestselling non-fiction work Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil.

Berendt’s potent true-crime melodrama introduced readers to The Lady by noting “she had both hands on her hips and a sassy half-smile on her face,” a posture Chablis would replicate in Clint Eastwood’s 1997 adaptation of the book. Her only major film role, Chablis’ performance provides a light counterpoint to the film’s murder-laced plot, charismatically flirting with a fish-out-of-water John Cusack and deploying the iconic phrase, “Two tears in a bucket, motherfuck it” as an acknowledgement of the hardships ...
See full article at The AV Club »

The Lady Chablis Dies: ‘Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil’ Character Played Herself In Clint Eastwood Film

The Lady Chablis Dies: ‘Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil’ Character Played Herself In Clint Eastwood Film
The Lady Chablis, the drag queen featured in the novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil who played herself in Clint Eastwood’s 1997 film version, has died. The news was posted on her Facebook page by Club One, the Savannah, Ga, room where she performed. She was 59. No cause of death was reported. Born Benjamin Knox on March 11, 1957, in Quincy, Fl, the performer used The Lady Chablis as a stage name for her comedy nightclub act. Her character was featured…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

The Lady Chablis, Best Known for Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Has Died

  • PEOPLE.com
The Lady Chablis, Best Known for Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Has Died
The Lady Chablis, the iconic nightclub performer best known for her turn in the 1997 film adaption of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, has died. She was 59. Club One, the Savannah, Georgia, hot spot where Chablis famously performed, announced her death on Facebook, Thursday. A friend, Cale Hall, further confirmed to the Associated Press that Chablis was suffering from pneumonia, and had been hospitalized for the past month. Chablis (née Benjamin Edward Knox) rose to prominence as the unlikely star of John Berendt's bestselling, 1994 non-fiction novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, which centered around Savannah and its inhabitants.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Lady Chablis, Best Known for Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Has Died

  • PEOPLE.com
The Lady Chablis, Best Known for Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Has Died
The Lady Chablis, the iconic nightclub performer best known for her turn in the 1997 film adaption of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, has died. She was 59. Club One, the Savannah, Georgia, hot spot where Chablis famously performed, announced her death on Facebook, Thursday. A friend, Cale Hall, further confirmed to the Associated Press that Chablis was suffering from pneumonia, and had been hospitalized for the past month. Chablis (née Benjamin Edward Knox) rose to prominence as the unlikely star of John Berendt's bestselling, 1994 non-fiction novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, which centered around Savannah and its inhabitants.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Lady Chablis, Star of ‘Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil’ and Drag Icon, Dies

The Lady Chablis, Star of ‘Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil’ and Drag Icon, Dies
The Lady Chablis, who was featured in John Berendt’s 1994 book “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil” and the 1997 film adaptation, died Thursday.

Club One, the Savannah Georgia venue where Chablis performed her revue, posted the following message on their Facebook page:

“The Lady Chablis, who stole hearts – and the spotlight – in ‘Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil,’ passed this morning surrounded by friends and family. In his best-selling novel, known in Savannah as ‘The Book,’ John Berendt wrote that when he first met The Lady Chablis, ‘she had both hands on her hips and a sassy half-smile on her face,’ a pose that would grace many stages … Chablis always wanted to give the audience, be it 15 or 1500, the best that she had. With her declining health, she regretted that her body wouldn’t allow her to give more.”

Berendt wrote Chablis into his best-selling novel
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lady Chablis, Famed Drag Performer in ‘Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,’ Dies at 59

  • The Wrap
Lady Chablis, Famed Drag Performer in ‘Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,’ Dies at 59
The Lady Chablis, drag performer famous for her role in “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,” died on Thursday. She was 59. According to Club One, a Savannah, Georgia club where she performed, she died surrounded by friends and family. The club wrote that Chablis was Club One’s very first entertainer, who officiated its grand opening in 1988. “Chablis always wanted to give the audience, be it 15 or 1,500, the best that she had,” the post stated. “With her declining health, she regretted that her body wouldn’t allow her to give more.” The cause of death was not...
See full article at The Wrap »

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

Clint Eastwood's mint juleps 'n' murder epic is an easygoing pleasure. Kevin Spacey, John Cusack and a host of great performances guarantee interest, but maybe I have to go to the book to really understand what's going on. A solid 'A' for this one, Clint. The Savannah tourism board must bless you in their nightly prayers. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Blu-ray The Warner Archive Collection 1997 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 155 min. / Street Date September 27, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 21.99 Starring John Cusack, Kevin Spacey, Jack Thompson, Irma P. Hall, Jude Law, Alison Eastwood, Paul Hipp, The Lady Chablis, Dorothy Loudon, Anne Haney, Kim Hunter, Geoffrey Lewis, Richard Herd, Jo Ann Pflug. Cinematography Jack N. Green Original Music Lennie Niehaus Written by John Lee Hancock from the book by John Berendt Produced by Clint Eastwood, Arnold Stiefel Directed by Clint Eastwood

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Clint Eastwood
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997

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Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script.

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue

Yeah.

Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

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Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue
See full article at Den of Geek »

Giveaway – Win The Blind Side on DVD

We’re giving you the chance to relive the extraordinary true story of “The Blind Side” this Mother’s Day! Enter now to be in with a chance of winning the DVD.

Golden Globe nominee Sandra Bullock, Oscar winner Kathy Bates and country singing star Tim McGraw headline this deeply moving adaptation of the Michael Lewis bestseller about a young man whose size and prowess playing American-style football help him attain an education in school and in life.

Quinton Aaron portrays the oversized teenager transformed from a homeless street kid to a star athlete through the kindness and charity of a dynamic woman (Bullock – Infamous) who offers him a stable home, a caring family and the opportunity to follow his dreams. Tim McGraw takes the role of the husband who discovers the boy’s talent, and Kathy Bates (Misery) plays the young man’s strict tutor in this riveting, heartfelt
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

1 Groundbreaking Film Incentive Program in Georgia

The historic port city of Savannah in Chatham County, Ga. wants the film and TV production market to not only come, but to stay. The Savannah Economic Development Authority, commonly known as Seda, has created an incentive program unlike any other in the country; its sole purpose is to build a stable and sustainable entertainment production industry in Chatham County. Seda has been around since the 1920s and is not funded by taxpayer dollars. Through special constitutional provisions at its inception it was granted the right to issue bonds to businesses as part of a tax abatement plan to create sustainable, long-term, job-creating businesses in Chatham County. In 2011 they hired Sri International to conduct local research, seeking to diversify an already diverse economy that consists of the fourth largest and fastest-growing port in the nation, a tourism industry that attracts over 13 million visitors per year, a military, government, manufacturing, and academic sector,
See full article at Backstage »

Has Political Correctness Killed TV Comedy?

Didja ever notice how politically correct all the kids are now? It's like you can't make jokes about anyone anymore. What is the Deal with that?

No, Jerry Seinfeld didn't say that, but just wait.

The 61-year-old sitcom icon has been making the rounds lately, from Espn's "The Herd with Colin Cowherd" to NBC's "Late Night With Seth Meyers." complaining that he can't perform at colleges because they get so sensitive about certain jokes, like the one where he compares a typical smartphone user to a "gay French king."

And it's not just college campuses where political correctness chills humor, apparently. It's also the place where Seinfeld was once master of his domain: television. This week, Spike announced it would cut a joke from the June 18 broadcast of the Guys Choice awards ceremony, where Clint Eastwood made a quip about athletes who've tried acting, including "Jim Brown and Caitlyn Somebody.
See full article at Moviefone »

Review: "Scobie Malone" (1975) Starring Jack Thompson

  • CinemaRetro
By Doug Oswald

I had no idea what to expect when I placed the DVD for “Scobie Malone” in my player. Scobie, played by Jack Thompson, makes his way through traffic on a sunny day in Sydney Australia as the movie credits begin. An Olivia Newton-John sound-alike sings the Scobie Malone title song. Scobie breaks the third wall by looking directly at the viewer as the title appears on-screen during his drive as an invitation to join him on his adventure. Scobie gives the thumbs up to a motorcycle cop during his drive. He winks, nods and flirts with pretty girls on the way to his swinging bachelor pad.

Scobie lives at “Sunrise Patios” and the entry sign proclaims Singles Only with a placard stating: No Vacancies. His bachelor pad is reached through the central courtyard containing a large patio and pool. A pretty girl in a bikini is changing
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