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At Long Last, The First Trailer For Terry Gilliam's The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Terry Gilliam's long-awaited The Man Who Killed Don Quixote actually exists! The first international trailer has been released to prove it and it looks wonderful. After all of these years, and all the problems this production has faced, Gilliam has finally made his passion project. The film stars Adam Driver (Star Wars: The Last Jedi) in the role of Toby and Jonathan Pryce (Pirates of the Caribbean) in the role of Don Quixote. As a fan of Gillam's film work, I couldn't be more excited about this!

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote tells the story of a deluded old man who is convinced he is Don Quixote, and who mistakes Toby, an advertising executive, for his trusty squire, Sancho Panza. The pair embark on a bizarre journey, jumping back and forth in time between the 21st and magical 17th century. Gradually, like the infamous knight himself, Toby becomes
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Robert Osher Joins Miramax as Chief Operating Officer, General Counsel

Industry veteran Robert Osher has joined Miramax as chief operating officer and general counsel.

Miramax CEO Bill Block made the announcement Monday. Osher, who led Sony’s digital division for seven years as president of Sony Pictures Digital Productions, will be part of Miramax’s new task force focusing on growing its strategy in film, television, and mergers & acquisitions.

During his tenure, Sony Pictures Animation produced the animated monster comedies “Hotel Transylvania” and “Hotel Transylvania 2,” the Smurfs films, and the Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs films. He departed from the Sony post in 2015, and has been consulting for private equity firms, international consulting firms and media companies in the interim.

“We are so happy to have Bob be a part of the new Miramax as someone who not only has tremendous understanding of the future of content and platforms, distributions, operations, as well as a familiarity with the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

TVLine Items: Game Night Renewed, Preacher Casts Allfather and More

TVLine Items: Game Night Renewed, Preacher Casts Allfather and More
Start brainstorming which celebrity showdowns you want to see on the next season of Hollywood Game Night.

NBC has renewed the Jane Lynch-hosted game show for a 13-episode sixth season, bringing back the supersized backyard games as well as introducing new challenges. A premiere date was not announced.

A special edition of Hollywood Game Night will air on Thursday, May 24 as part of NBC’s annual Red Nose Day fundraiser.

Ready for more of today’s newsy nuggets? Well…

* Season 3 of AMC’s Preacher has cast Jonny Coyne (The Blacklist, Once Upon a time in Wonderland) in the recurring role of Allfather D’Aronique,
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘As Good As It Gets’ Turns 20: Helen Hunt, James L. Brooks, Greg Kinnear Share Secrets of an Oscars Winner

‘As Good As It Gets’ Turns 20: Helen Hunt, James L. Brooks, Greg Kinnear Share Secrets of an Oscars Winner
Twenty years ago, Jack Nicholson hopped through the streets of downtown Manhattan, trying to avoid the cracks in the sidewalk in “As Good as it Gets.” Playing the obsessive-compulsive novelist Melvin Udall in the James L. Brooks-directed comedy landed Nicholson his third Oscar in 1998. It was a difficult task, channeling a character that falls in love with a waitress as his local diner (Helen Hunt) and befriends his gay neighbor (Greg Kinnear), while staying true to his core as a grumpy brute. “You make me want to be a better man,” he says in an often-quoted line from the script.

If you revisit “As Good As It Gets” now, you can see how much has changed in Hollywood. For starters, the movie cost $50 million, a much larger budget than what studios currently spend on character-driven ensembles like “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” or “Lady Bird.” When it opened in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

From Elliott Smith to Sufjan Stevens, Repping Indie Rock at the Oscars

From Elliott Smith to Sufjan Stevens, Repping Indie Rock at the Oscars
“I’m just thrilled to be nominated and to be there and be witness to it all,” Sufjan Stevens told Variety in a recent interview, expressing gratitude for his Oscar nod for “Mystery of Love,” one of the two original songs he wrote for “Call Me By Your Name.” In taking a happy-just-to-be-there stance, Stevens may be being magnanimous — or just realistic, given how historically impervious Academy voters have proven to indie-rock over the years, especially in the final voting stretch.

Only once, or “Once,” has the Academy awarded Best Song to an artist who might be considered to have come from the indie-rock realm, when Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova, who formerly shared space in the band the Frames, won a decade ago for “Falling Slowly.” Some might consider their genre to be more in the realm of adult alternative or Americana, but at least they were artists signed to an indie label,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robin Williams (‘Good Will Hunting’) voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s for profound performance [Poll Results]

Robin Williams (‘Good Will Hunting’) voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s for profound performance [Poll Results]
Robin Williams has been voted your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s for his profound performance as psychologist Sean Maguire in “Good Will Hunting.” The late actor handily won Gold Derby’s recent poll asking you to vote for your top Supporting Actor of the decade.

Williams won with an impressive 38% of the vote, with Joe Pesci (“Goodfellas”) coming in second at 23%. The only other performances to gain double-digit percentage points were Kevin Spacey (“The Usual Suspects”) with 11% and Martin Landau (“Ed Wood”) at 10%. Gene Hackman (“Unforgiven”) rounded out the top five with 6% of the vote. From there we had Cuba Gooding Jr. (“Jerry Maguire”) at 5%, Tommy Lee Jones (“The Fugitive”) at 4%, Michael Caine (“The Cider House Rules”) at 2% and James Coburn (“Affliction”) at 1%. Jack Palance (“City Slickers”) was the only actor to not earn a single percentage point.

SEESam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) would be sixth Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

Minnie Driver Makes a Dig at "Nice, White Male" Matt Damon for Sexual Harassment Comments

Minnie Driver Makes a Dig at
Minnie Driver isn't letting Matt Damon off the hook for his controversial comments regarding sexual harassment.  Back in December, the British actress took her former boyfriend and Good Will Hunting co-star to task after Damon argued there is a "spectrum of behavior" to consider when labeling individuals accused of abuse. Damon ultimately apologized, saying on the Today show he should've "listened a lot more" before weighing in on the #TimesUp movement.  In a new interview with the New York Times, Driver said Damon's remarks "represented every intelligent, nice white male who feels it is their job to comment on the way that women metabolize...
See full article at E! Online »

Minnie Driver Rationalizes Matt Damon's Sexual Harassment Remarks: He's a 'Nice White Male'

Minnie Driver Rationalizes Matt Damon's Sexual Harassment Remarks: He's a 'Nice White Male'
Minnie Driver is once again calling out her former costar and boyfriend Matt Damon for his previous comments about sexual misconduct in Hollywood and beyond.

In December, Damon told ABC News that the alleged sexual misconduct of powerful men represented a “spectrum of behavior,” explaining that he believes there is “a difference between patting someone on the butt and rape or child molestation. Both of those behaviors need to be confronted and eradicated without question, but they shouldn’t be conflated.”

He also said, “I think it’s wonderful that women are feeling empowered to tell their stories and it’s totally necessary.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Minnie Driver Rationalizes Matt Damon's Sexual Harassment Remarks: He's a 'Nice White Male'

Minnie Driver Rationalizes Matt Damon's Sexual Harassment Remarks: He's a 'Nice White Male'
Minnie Driver is once again calling out her former costar and boyfriend Matt Damon for his previous comments about sexual misconduct in Hollywood and beyond.

In December, Damon told ABC News that the alleged sexual misconduct of powerful men represented a “spectrum of behavior,” explaining that he believes there is “a difference between patting someone on the butt and rape or child molestation. Both of those behaviors need to be confronted and eradicated without question, but they shouldn’t be conflated.”

He also said, “I think it’s wonderful that women are feeling empowered to tell their stories and it’s totally necessary.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

First Photo For Terry Gilliam's Long-Awaited Film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

This is our first official photo from director Terry Gilliam's The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. After all that Gilliam has gone through in trying to make this film over the years, it's crazy that it actually got made. This first photo features Adam Driver (Star Wars: The Last Jedi) as Toby and Jonathan Pryce (Pirate of the Caribbean) in the role of Don Quixote.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote tells the story of a deluded old man who is convinced he is Don Quixote, and who mistakes Toby, an advertising executive, for his trusty squire, Sancho Panza. The pair embark on a bizarre journey, jumping back and forth in time between the 21st and magical 17th century. Gradually, like the infamous knight himself, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to determine his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical and emotional finale
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Gus Van Sant on 'Don’t Worry, He Won't Get Far On Foot' and why a theatrical release is still crucial

Gus Van Sant on 'Don’t Worry, He Won't Get Far On Foot' and why a theatrical release is still crucial
Heading to Berlin with his Amazon-financed Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot, Gus Van Sant tells Screen why he still prefers to see films in a theatre.

Gus Van Sant could easily be the most anonymous person in the room when Screen International meets the filmmaker at Sundance Film Festival. Far from ostentatious, and with his dog at his feet, it is the expression that gives him away — like a 1960s surfer dad caught in the headlights of today.

Decked out in a plaid shirt and jeans in a converted media lounge in Park City, Van Sant gives nothing away about how he feels Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot went down at its Sundance world premiere several days earlier. In fact, there was generous applause at the Eccles Theatre and U.S. critics have been mainly supportive.

Now Van Sant’s latest feature heads to Berlin, where FilmNation handles international sales and a broader audience will sample his tribute to late quadriplegic cartoonist John Callahan, which glides between acerbic character study and observational comedy. Van Sant had known Callahan’s drawings and began hanging out with his fellow Portlander when Robin Williams optioned Callahan’s book circa 1997, and they began to map out an adaptation. “He didn’t live very far — it was only 10 blocks,” Van Sant mumbles, breaking into a fleeting smile when someone brings his Australian Shepherd puppy. “We went on trips. He liked to go in a cab that could take his wheelchair and go to a restaurant on the beach.”
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Hollywood Flashback: Berlinale Liked Gus Van Sant’s Apples in 1998

Hollywood Flashback: Berlinale Liked Gus Van Sant’s Apples in 1998
Though the image of him holding a Silver Bear trophy in the air, with producer Lawrence Bender beaming beside him, would suggest that director Gus Van Sant reigned triumphant at the 1998 Berlin International Film Festival, that wasn’t quite the case. His film Good Will Hunting was indeed awarded a Silver Bear — but it went to Matt Damon, who, as star and co-writer (with Ben Affleck), was given the honor for “outstanding single achievement.” (The jury did not specify to which single achievement it was referring.) Van Sant, meanwhile, saw the Golden Bear for best film go that year...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Movies to Write Your Essay About

You’ll learn more about some great movies that inspire writing about them and the topics that are brought up by them.

Movies Inspiring for Essay Writing

Even if you are not a cinephile, there’s still the need to have the reason to share your thoughts now and then on some recently watched movie. If the brand-new films do nothing to inspire writing about them, and you begin searching for your sources of inspiration elsewhere, we advise you to consider several films that will definitely change your mind.

By the way, if you decide to charge somebody else with writing your essay, instead of telling someone “write an essay for me” you can make request on one of the specialized sites. You can’t go wrong with that.

Good Will Hunting

If you haven’t watched this movie, well, you missed a whole lot. Few films have ever been
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 1990s went to many long overdue veterans of the industry. Actors like James Coburn, Jack Palance and Martin Landau finally earned Oscars in this decade, alongside then-newer stars like Cuba Gooding Jr and Kevin Spacey. What is your favorite Best Supporting Actor performance of the 1990s?

Read through a recap of their performances and vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actor.)

Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas” (1990) — Joe Pesci won his Oscar with the most iconic role of his career. In “Goodfellas” Pesci plays Tommy DeVito, a blustering gangster who provides some of the funniest lines in the film. Pesci was previously nominated in Best Supporting Actor for “Raging Bull” (1980).

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1990s: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme … ? [Poll]

Jack Palance, “City Slickers” (1991) — Jack Palance finally won his Oscar thanks to “City Slickers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Winners: The Overlooked and the Overrated

With so much already written, so many entertainment show discussions and pub debates raging each year about who should have won an Oscar for what, here’s a slightly different take on Hollywood’s big night out. What about those who have actually won – specifically in the Best Picture category – even those who’ve done so deservingly? Isn’t it time they came under the microscope for the wrong reasons? Being the Mark Kermode of the East Midlands, there aren’t too many winners that I haven’t cast my critical eye over, and yet there remains a select few I’ve yet to see purely out of choice. The entries on this shortlist are nothing personal, but if you think I’m being unfair then feel free to leave your comments near the bottom of the page.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Best Picture Winner, 1976)

This may
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Paul Thomas Anderson (‘Phantom Thread’) earns 7th & 8th Oscar nominations on 20th anniversary of his 1st for ‘Boogie Nights’

Paul Thomas Anderson (‘Phantom Thread’) earns 7th & 8th Oscar nominations on 20th anniversary of his 1st for ‘Boogie Nights’
Paul Thomas Anderson earned a pair of Oscar nominations this year for Best Picture and Best Director for the romantic drama “Phantom Thread.” It might have been as surprising to him as it was to us Oscar pundits, who didn’t see those nominations coming. And it was an even more meaningful honor for the filmmaker considering it came exactly 20 years after his first academy bid for “Boogie Nights” (1997).

Anderson contended in Best Original Screenplay for that film, a sprawling chronicle of one man’s (Mark Walhberg) adventures in the California adult film world of the late 1970s and 1980s — like Robert Altman‘s “Nashville” for the porn industry. The film reaped additional bids for supporting players Burt Reynolds and Julianne Moore, who lost to Robin Williams (“Good Will Hunting”) and Kim Basinger (“L.A. Confidential”), respectively. Anderson lost his category to “Hunting” scribes Ben Affleck and Matt Damon.

See Watch out Gary Oldman!
See full article at Gold Derby »

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?
With their wins at Sunday’s Screen Actors Guild Awards, Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards”) and Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) continue their march toward becoming the first foursome to sweep the Golden Globe, Critics’ Choice, SAG, BAFTA and Oscar. Their SAG victories are the most important ones of the three groups so far, as the SAGs have a fantastic correlation with the Oscars; SAG has only missed five times in Best Actor, six times in Best Actress, nine times in Best Supporting Actor and seven times in Best Supporting Actress. But despite so much overlap between the individual races, SAG does not go 4-for-4 with Oscar in one season as often as you might think.

Over its 23-year history, SAG has only had a direct match in all four Oscar acting races six times, most recently three years ago. SAG typically goes 3-for-4 with Oscar,
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 SAG Awards: 4 reasons why Alexander Skarsgard (‘Big Little Lies’) will complete awards sweep on Sunday

  • Gold Derby
On Sunday, January 21, Alexander Skarsgard is hoping to complete his awards sweep for HBO’s “Big Little Lies” by taking home the 2018 Screen Actors Guild Award. (See the list of SAG nominations.) While Gold Derby’s combined predictions have Skarsgard tied with Robert De Niro (“The Wizard of Lies”) at 6/5 odds to win, scroll down to see why I predict that Skarsgard has the edge over all of his competitors: De Niro, Jeff Daniels (“Godless”), Benedict Cumberbatch (“Sherlock: The Lying Detective”) and Geoffrey Rush (“Genius”).

Clean sweep — The Swedish actor has already claimed victory at the Emmys, Golden Globes and Critics’ Choice Awards for “Big Little Lies,” so a SAG triumph would give him a clean sweep of the four major televised kudos. Sometimes sweeps just happen and there’s nothing anyone can do to stop them. Look at Sarah Paulson‘s awards domination last year for “The People v.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sundance Film Review: ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’

We live in an era where the specter and awareness of child abuse is so pervasive that you can’t just throw that issue into a narrative without really taking it on — doing anything less would be like introducing the proverbial gun and then never having anyone fire it. Based on Israeli director Nadav Lapid’s 2014 drama of the same title, Sara Colangelo’s “The Kindergarten Teacher” stars Maggie Gyllenthal as the title figure, a dissatisfied working wife and mother on Staten Island whose frustrated artistic aspirations find an outlet of sorts in the discovery that one of her 5-year-old charges is an apparent poetical prodigy.

As her interest rapidly grows from enthusiasm to obsession, she begins crossing the line of acceptable professional behavior — but with viewers uncertain whether she’s simply an over-zealous mentor or someone who poses a real threat to a child’s well-being, the ambiguity with which Colangelo views that line-crossing frustrates as well
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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