8.3/10
849,472
915 user 166 critic

Good Will Hunting (1997)

Trailer
2:21 | Trailer
Will Hunting, a janitor at M.I.T., has a gift for mathematics, but needs help from a psychologist to find direction in his life.

Director:

Gus Van Sant
Reviews
Popularity
330 ( 12)
Top Rated Movies #88 | Won 2 Oscars. Another 22 wins & 61 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Matt Damon ... Will
Ben Affleck ... Chuckie
Stellan Skarsgård ... Lambeau
John Mighton John Mighton ... Tom
Rachel Majorowski Rachel Majorowski ... Krystyn
Colleen McCauley Colleen McCauley ... Cathy
Casey Affleck ... Morgan
Cole Hauser ... Billy
Matt Mercier ... Barbershop Quartet #1
Ralph St. George Ralph St. George ... Barbershop Quartet #2
Rob Lynds Rob Lynds ... Barbershop Quartet #3
Dan Washington Dan Washington ... Barbershop Quartet #4
Alison Folland ... M.I.T. Student
Derrick Bridgeman Derrick Bridgeman ... M.I.T. Student
Vik Sahay ... M.I.T. Student (as Vic Sahay)
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Storyline

A touching tale of a wayward young man who struggles to find his identity, living in a world where he can solve any problem, except the one brewing deep within himself, until one day he meets his soul mate who opens his mind and his heart. Written by Dima & Danielle

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Wildly charismatic. Impossibly brilliant. Totally rebellious. For the first 20 years of his life, Will Hunting has called the shots. Now he's about to meet his match. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, including some sex-related dialogue | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the scene on the park bench, Robin Williams gives an example of love that Will hasn't experienced as "going to hell and back for it." In his next movie, What Dreams May Come (1998), Williams does just that for his love, played by Annabella Sciorra, after she commits suicide. See more »

Goofs

The combinatorial problems and solutions shown on blackboards are elementary ones, not the sort that would occupy a Fields medalist for years. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Lambeau: Mod fx... squared... dx. So please finish Parceval, by next time. I know many of you had this as undergraduates, but it won't hurt to brush up.
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Crazy Credits

Throughout the end credits, Will's car is driving down the highway until the very end, when the car drives around a bend and disappears. See more »

Alternate Versions

In the theatrical release, Chuckie gets angry with Morgan for using his little league baseball glove as "clean up." However in the TV version, Chuckie ends the scene with a curt "Why don't you do what you're doin' at your house." Also, when Will is with the first psychiatrist, the mention of "putting from the rough" is deleted. See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Agonizing Decisions in Movies (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Why Do I Lie?
Written by Jill Cunniff (as Jill Cuniff)
Performed by Luscious Jackson
Courtesy of Grand Royal/Capitol Records
Under license from EMI-Capitol Music Special Markets
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User Reviews

 
A slow burner, a fine achievement
17 March 1999 | by Stephen-12See all my reviews

Sure, this film's plot is fairly predictable. Sure, if you boiled it down to its essential components it wouldn't amount to much. Sure, Will Hunting's genius is profoundly unrealistic.

Yet I'm giving this one 10 out of 10.

I don't know whether Matt and Ben have ever been in therapy, but they certainly understand a lot about the human psyche, how it ducks responsibility, and pushes blame onto others, how it dismisses the real gifts it has and concentrates on running itself down. How many of us suffer from the same problems as Will? Only those who deny their own vulnerability will remain unaffected by this film.

Not only is the script powerful, but the dynamics between the characters - all of them selfish, even Skylar - is vividly and plausibly executed. The film just about manages to avoid easy answers, preferring to acknowledge (indeed, highlight) the complexity and pain of personal growth and self-realisation.

You could read a lot of self-help books, but they won't bring across to you as powerfully as this film what it's like to be scared, what it's like to experience loss, how difficult it is to shake off your old ways of thinking, how important honesty to yourself is. If this is the kind of revelation Matt and Ben are going to come up with, I look forward to their future efforts.

The first time I saw it, I felt moved as the credits rolled. On my way home from the cinema, I felt sombre. When I got home, I finally burst into tears. This film burns slowly, inside you.

As cinema, it's fair to middling. The performances are all first class. The script is a jewel. As wisdom, it's second to none. A fine achievement.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 January 1998 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Good Will Hunting See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$272,912, 7 December 1997

Gross USA:

$138,433,435

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$225,933,435
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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