8.4/10
62
3 user 4 critic

Death by Design: Where Parallel Worlds Meet (1997)

| Documentary
A guided tour into the invisible world of cells, told through a collage of metaphors. Discusses and portrays the invisible world of cells, how they communicate with each other, work ... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Klaus-Michael Debatin Klaus-Michael Debatin ... Himself
Pierre Golstein Pierre Golstein ... Himself
Robert Horvitz Robert Horvitz ... Himself
Rita Levi-Montalcini Rita Levi-Montalcini ... Herself
Polly Matzinger Polly Matzinger ... Herself
Martin Raff Martin Raff ... Himself
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Storyline

A guided tour into the invisible world of cells, told through a collage of metaphors. Discusses and portrays the invisible world of cells, how they communicate with each other, work together, reproduce, and die, all to benefit the larger organism of which they are a part. State-of-the-art microcinematography is playfully intercut with parallel images from life at the human scale: a hundred lighted violins, imploding skyscrapers, pieces of film on the cutting room floor. Contains interviews with noted biologists. Written by Fiona Kelleghan <fkelleghan@aol.com>

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Documentary

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Country:

USA

Language:

English

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Color
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Featured in Zomergasten: Episode #20.4 (2007) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A great scientific documentary
12 January 1999 | by Manu-8See all my reviews

This documentary explains a strange mechanism of pluricellular bodies (like ours) to produce large amounts of cells that are destroyed without having been used. That is the central point of the movie, but the directors also have made an effort to explain this point as simply as possible so they make lots of references to human conduct in which you can see that our social behavior -at least seen from the outside- looks a lot like what cells do. All scientists interviewed are clear and pedagogic and, thanks to their testimonies, the strange phenomenon of cellular death ends up being also a reflection of our (western) society's fear of death. A great, entertaining and enlightning film.


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