5.9/10
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319 user 99 critic

Dante's Peak (1997)

Trailer
0:31 | Trailer
A vulcanologist arrives at a countryside town recently named the second most desirable place to live in America, and discovers that the long dormant volcano, Dante's Peak, may wake up at any moment.

Director:

Roger Donaldson

Writer:

Leslie Bohem
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Popularity
2,717 ( 190)
4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Pierce Brosnan ... Harry Dalton
Linda Hamilton ... Rachel Wando
Jamie Renée Smith ... Lauren Wando
Jeremy Foley ... Graham Wando
Elizabeth Hoffman ... Ruth
Charles Hallahan ... Paul Dreyfus
Grant Heslov ... Greg
Kirk Trutner ... Terry Furlong
Arabella Field ... Nancy
Tzi Ma ... Stan
Brian Reddy ... Les Worrell
Lee Garlington ... Dr. Jane Fox
Bill Bolender ... Sheriff Turner
Carole Androsky Carole Androsky ... Mary Kelly (as Carol Androsky)
Peter Jason ... Norman Gates
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Storyline

Volcanologist Harry Dalton and mayor Rachel Wando of Dante's Peak try to convince the city council and the other volcanologists that the volcano right above Dante's peak is indeed dangerous. People's safety is being set against economical interests. Written by Rune Dahl Fitjar <rfitjar@online.no>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Whatever you do, don't look back See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disaster related peril and gore | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The shirt Greg wears on the first day of observing Dante's Peak is a graph showing the eruptions of the Cascade volcanoes in the past 4000 years. See more »

Goofs

The one-lane bridge leading out of town is wide enough to fit two cars side-by-side during the evacuation, yet when the vulcanologists are fleeing in the Humvees and USGS van later, it is barely wide enough for one vehicle. This is because this scene features a miniature bridge and model vehicles. When Paul's van is stuck on the edge of the bridge at the end of the sequence, everything is back to full-size again and you can see there would be room for two vehicles side-by-side. See more »

Quotes

Harry Dalton: I move around a lot: Colombia, Guatemala, the Philippines, Mexico, New Zealand, New Guinea... wherever there's a volcano with an attitude.
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Connections

Featured in Getting Close to the Show (1998) See more »

Soundtracks

Blue Moon Revisited
Written by Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart, Margo Timmins, Michael Timmins
Performed by Cowboy Junkies
Courtesy of the RCA Records Label of BMG Entertainment
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User Reviews

 
special effects that hold up today
10 May 2012 | by grnhair2001See all my reviews

There is a formula for disaster movies and books. An insightful scientist sees The Bad Thing is going to happen, various foils keep him from warning people (often with sillier motivation than in this film), we get to know a bunch of average Joe characters who survive or do not survive the disaster. Earthquake movies, movies about made-up natural disasters that cannot happen, asteroid movies, even some nuclear holocaust films (like The Day After, unique in how many survive). It's a hackneyed formula, but it also works, and nothing else really does work as well for disaster plots. It was followed here.

The special effects were terrific in the day, and they still hold up very very well in 2012.

For a Hollywood film, the science was pretty good. I actually cringed back at the shots of Hawaii type basalt floes (just...no), and the ashfall cleared up nicely whenever they wanted a wide shot, which anyone in Yakima could tell you it really doesn't do, and the boat and drive-over-lava scenes were silly, and if you paddle a boat (through acid or not) with one hand, it's not going to go straight, and our heroes didn't need to cover their mouths in ashfall (meaning, IRL, the ash would turn to concrete in their lungs and they'd suffocate). However, all that having been complained about, much else was very accurate: what gets tested for by volcanologists, what monitoring stations of the day looked like, what some of the warning signs of a coming eruption might be. Most Hollywood film reviews by me on science-based movies are nothing but a list of what they did wrong, with no "however" of accurate bits to follow that list, so kudos for doing it more than half right.

A pleasant diversion, very pretty to look at.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 February 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dante's Peak See more »

Filming Locations:

Santa Clarita, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$116,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$18,479,435, 9 February 1997

Gross USA:

$67,127,760

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$178,127,760
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | DTS-Stereo | Dolby SR | Dolby | SDDS (2000 Re-Release)| DTS (Digital DTS Sound) (2000 Re-Release)| Dolby Digital (2000 Re-Release)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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