A working-class family from Melbourne, Australia fights city hall after being told they must vacate their beloved family home to allow for infrastructural expansion.

Director:

Rob Sitch

Writers:

Santo Cilauro (written and conceived by), Tom Gleisner (written and conceived by) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
2 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Caton ... Darryl Kerrigan
Anne Tenney Anne Tenney ... Sal Kerrigan
Stephen Curry ... Dale Kerrigan
Anthony Simcoe ... Steve Kerrigan
Sophie Lee Sophie Lee ... Tracey Kerrigan
Wayne Hope ... Wayne Kerrigan
Tiriel Mora ... Dennis Denuto
Eric Bana ... Con Petropoulous
Charles 'Bud' Tingwell ... Lawrence Hammill
Robyn Nevin ... Federal Court Judge
Costas Kilias ... Farouk
Bryan Dawe Bryan Dawe ... Ron Graham
Monty Maizels Monty Maizels ... Jack
Lynda Gibson Lynda Gibson ... Evonne
John Benton John Benton ... Mr. Lyle
Edit

Storyline

A Melbourne family is very happy living where they do, near the Melbourne airport (according to Jane Kennedy, it's "practically their back yard"). However, they are forced to leave their beloved home, by the Government and airport authorities. 'The Castle' is the story of how they fight to remain in their house, taking their case as far as the High Court. Written by Simon Quinn <G.Quinn@mailbox.uq.edu.au>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Ordinary Family. Extraordinary Story. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

As of 2018 the house used to film "The Castle" was set to be demolished on more than one occasion but something stopped both council and demolition crews, mainly due to backlash to leave the house alone, and that it should be left alone because the movie is an Aussie classic. See more »

Goofs

In the background, either side of viewing Sal's lampshade, a packet of Smith's chips is visible. Before we see the lampshade, the chip packet is facing backwards, after the scene, the packet is facing forwards. See more »

Quotes

Farouk: You have friend, I have friend. My friend go to your house, put bomb under your car and blow you to fucking sky!
Darryl Kerrigan: What did he do?
Farouk: He get scared and he leave!
See more »

Alternate Versions

After some mixed sneak previews, distributor Miramax ordered some changes to the film's dialogue for the USA release and a new music score. Two noticeable differences in the US version in respect to the Australian version:
  • They call the rissoles 'meatloaf'.
  • Dale's narration changes the line "Tracey was the only one in our house with a tertiary education" to "Tracey was the only one in our house with a college education".
See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Chase Australia: Episode #2.61 (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

All Right Now
Written by Andy Fraser and Paul Rodgers (as Paul Bernard Rodgers)
Performed by Free
Published by Blue Mountain Music, Ltd
All rights for North America controlled and administered by Pubco
Courtesy of A&M Records, Inc. and Island Records, Ltd., under license from Universal Music Special Markets
See more »

User Reviews

 
Brilliant Australian film
8 October 2005 | by seh-7See all my reviews

Of all the excellent comedies the vastly underrated Australian film industry makes, this is the only one which I insist that every single friend I make from overseas must watch.

This is the quintessential Aussie film - a simple story about a family trying to keep things the way they are, not afraid to have a go at those in power who think they would like to "develop" these people. It's brilliant.

Basic plot: The Kerrigan household is a happy one, but a knock on the door one day changes that. Faced with a compulsory acquisition notice, the family's patriarch decides to take on the system, and to prove for once and for all that a man's home is his castle.

The jokes are funny, but are very Aussie-centric. I'm really surprised at the amount of positive feedback in these reviews from non Aussies, I've always felt that this is one movie which requires a 'native speakin' translator' if you are to get all the jokes! (And tend to recommend overseas folk watch The Dish, made by the same film team but is far more accessible and wider in scope than the very narrowly aimed Castle, which is really just driven by Australian humour, language and colloquialisms).

A true gem, very vibrant movie. For anyone who grew up in a similar location (not next to an airport, but in a 'bogan', working class suburb or small town) it will remind you of so many things you saw as a child. Profanity? Get over it, that's how we talk!


53 of 58 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 159 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 May 1999 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Castle See more »

Filming Locations:

Victoria, Australia See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$29,452, 9 May 1999

Gross USA:

$877,621

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$877,862
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed