7.1/10
501
2 user 5 critic

The House (1997)

A Casa (original title)
A ramshackle mansion in the woods: individuals of all type, age and condition eat, roam or rest inside. But always in strict silence.

Director:

Sharunas Bartas
Reviews
2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Francisco Nascimento Francisco Nascimento
Valeria Bruni Tedeschi
Alex Descas
Leos Carax
Oksana Chernych Oksana Chernych
Viktorija Nareiko Viktorija Nareiko
Eugenija Sulgaite
Leonardas Zelcius
Egle Kuckaite Egle Kuckaite
Greta Sapkaite Greta Sapkaite
Evinij Jankelevic Evinij Jankelevic
Aloyzas Mongirdas Aloyzas Mongirdas
Atanas Cereska Atanas Cereska
Marija Olsauskaite Marija Olsauskaite
Ingrida Kucinskaite Ingrida Kucinskaite
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Storyline

A ramshackle mansion in the woods: individuals of all type, age and condition eat, roam or rest inside. But always in strict silence.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

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Parents Guide:

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Quotes

Title Card: In the future I am free because it hasn't happened yet.
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User Reviews

 
Cold, a little less grey, wordless comfort, almost
13 October 2002 | by noitsme_habibiSee all my reviews

The House was reviewed a little less favorably than Bartas' earlier films (regular cinemagoers having given up long ago), but personally I found it his most beautiful film yet.

Bartas does tend to repeat himself, it's true. Reviewers love his grim shadowscapes, shot in B/W, of anonymous, more or less lonely, drunk or disheveled men and women stumbling through a haze of cold forests, smoky houses and city wastelands in seemingly arbitrarily fashion - but even they get, I assume, weary of it.

(Contrary to what you might think based on the above, there is nothing gothic about Bartas' depressed realities; and he himself insists, whenever somebody dares suggest a socio-political interpretation, there's nothing Soviet about it either. It's existential. No matter, to me his 'The Corridor' still serves as a brilliant visual summary of the comfortless, hopeless human condition of the former Soviet Union).

But The House, the way I experienced it in any case, showed a whole new step. Not just because there was some color. But because abstract, surrealist scenes of indulgence - eating, caressing - and a suggested presence of tales about the house were added to the mere stumbling in the dark, making the film sensual, almost, without ever lessening the impact of how lost (these) people seem.

More than that. Having suspended, first, your urge to recognize or follow any story line, then, even, your urge to formulate any analysis or interpretation of the images he's providing you with - by the time you're just looking at what you see and *feeling* - suddenly you find yourself watching at a fire outside, on the ice in the lake, and there is a glow, and even the sound of unexplained fireworks, and although it's still lonely, it's *pretty*, and you - well, I was, in any case - are moved, sincerely moved.

That's good, if mere images - without plot, without actors, without explanation or meaning even, can move you, to your bones, almost make you cry in grief or relief, that's pretty good. 10/10.


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Details

Country:

Lithuania | Portugal | France

Release Date:

1 October 1997 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The House See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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